A Clockwork Orange Trivia Quiz Books

"What is Malcolm McDowell's character's name?

Author: Victoria Love

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 26

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"What is Malcolm McDowell's character's name? The milk at the establishment was called ""milk plus"". It had drugs added to it. What was NOT added to the ""milk plus"" at this establishment? Who let Ms. Shields know where Flick was? Amaze your friends and family with all things related to the A Clockwork Orange Movie If you know your Movie, there are 240+ questions sure to riddle even the most die hard fan! Ready to take the challenge? A Clockwork Orange Trivia Quiz Book today!"

Stanley Kubrick s A Clockwork Orange

Cast size: large.

Author: Stanley Kubrick

Publisher: ScreenPress Books

ISBN: 9781901680478

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 340

View: 150

Cast size: large.

A Clockwork Orange

A satire of the present inhumanity of man to man through a futuristic culture where teenagers rule with violence. This edition includes the final chapter deleted from the first American edition.

Author:

Publisher: Turtleback Books

ISBN: 9780808581949

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 156

A satire of the present inhumanity of man to man through a futuristic culture where teenagers rule with violence. This edition includes the final chapter deleted from the first American edition.

Stanley Kubrick s A Clockwork Orange

Table of contents

Author: Stuart Y. McDougal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521574884

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 168

View: 204

Stanley Kubrick's 'A Clockwork Orange' brings together new and critically informed essays about one of the most powerful, important and controversial films ever made. Following an introduction that provides an overview of the film and its production history, a suite of essays examine the literary origins of the work, the nature of cinematic violence, questions of gender and the film's treatment of sexuality, and the difficulties of adapting an invented language ('nadsat') for the screen. This volume also includes two contemporary and conflicting reviews by Roger Hughes and Pauline Kael, a detailed glossary of 'nadsat' and stills from the film.

A Clockwork Orange Restored Text

two minutes of material derived from A Clockwork Orange, was a dignified tribute
to Burgess's long life of musical and literary creativity. Even in death, it seemed,
Burgess (who had often parodied the style of no-nonsense, rightwing columnists
 ...

Author: Anthony Burgess

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393239195

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 640

A newly revised text for A Clockwork Orange’s 50th anniversary brings the work closest to its author’s intentions. A Clockwork Orange is as brilliant, transgressive, and influential as when it was published fifty years ago. A nightmare vision of the future told in its own fantastically inventive lexicon, it has since become a classic of modern literature and the basis for Stanley Kubrick’s once-banned film, whose recent reissue has brought this revolutionary tale on modern civilization to an even wider audience. Andrew Biswell, PhD, director of the International Burgess Foundation, has taken a close look at the three varying published editions alongside the original typescript to recreate the novel as Anthony Burgess envisioned it. We publish this landmark edition with its original British cover and six of Burgess’s own illustrations.

A Clockwork Orange

I went to see Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange in New York, fighting to get in
like everybody else. It was worth the fight, I thought – very much a Kubrick movie,
technically brilliant, thoughtful, relevant, poetic, mind-opening. It was possible ...

Author: Anthony Burgess

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141970685

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 355

Fully restored edition of Anthony Burgess' original text of A Clockwork Orange, with a glossary of the teen slang 'Nadsat', explanatory notes, pages from the original typescript, interviews, articles and reviews Edited by Andrew Biswell With a Foreword by Martin Amis 'It is a horrorshow story ...' Fifteen-year-old Alex likes lashings of ultraviolence. He and his gang of friends rob, kill and rape their way through a nightmarish future, until the State puts a stop to his riotous excesses. But what will his re-education mean? A dystopian horror, a black comedy, an exploration of choice, A Clockwork Orange is also a work of exuberant invention which created a new language for its characters. This critical edition restores the text of the novel as Anthony Burgess originally wrote it, and includes a glossary of the teen slang 'Nadsat', explanatory notes, pages from the original typescript, interviews, articles and reviews, shedding light on the enduring fascination of the novel's 'sweet and juicy criminality'. Anthony Burgess was born in Manchester in 1917 and educated at Xaverian College and Manchester University. He spent six years in the British Army before becoming a schoolmaster and colonial education officer in Malaya and Brunei. After the success of his Malayan Trilogy, he became a full-time writer in 1959. His books have been published all over the world, and they include The Complete Enderby, Nothing Like the Sun, Napoleon Symphony, Tremor of Intent, Earthly Powers and A Dead Man in Deptford. Anthony Burgess died in London in 1993. Andrew Biswell is the Professor of Modern Literature at Manchester Metropolitan University and the Director of the International Anthony Burgess Foundation. His publications include a biography, The Real Life of Anthony Burgess, which won the Portico Prize in 2006. He is currently editing the letters and short stories of Anthony Burgess.

Notebook

Journal Notebook Medium Size 5.5'' x 8.5'' White Paper 118 Pages with Black Cover Perfect for Kids or Men and Women Cute Gift TMakes a wonderful gift for family - friends - and loved ones to inspire and motivate.

Author: Alex Ryan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 118

View: 352

Journal Notebook Medium Size 5.5'' x 8.5'' White Paper 118 Pages with Black Cover Perfect for Kids or Men and Women Cute Gift TMakes a wonderful gift for family - friends - and loved ones to inspire and motivate. Perfect for all ages - kids or adults. Price for this notebook is unbelievable! Perfect size to carry over everywhere.

The expressionistic style and the theatricality in Stanley Kubrick s A Clockwork Orange 1971

(Hayward, p.172) Kubrick's goals are not so different from those of the
expressionists. Especially in “A Clockwork Orange” but also in “Eyes Wide Shut”,
Kubrick presents a very deep analysis of the human society. In both films the
major theme ...

Author: Oliver Schill

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638245233

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 19

View: 732

Seminar paper from the year 2003 in the subject Film Science, grade: A, Concordia University Montreal (Mel Hoppenheim School Of Cinema), course: Stanley Kubrick Seminar, 7 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: I don’t know many filmmakers within their films are more pictorial structures than in the films of Stanley Kubrick. In the following essay, “A Clockwork Orange” will be analyzed in terms of expressionism and theatricality. There not only the pictorial structure of the shots, but also the structure of the entire film is very interesting. The film has three main parts. The first one contains Alex’s violent performance, the second is Alex’s cure in jail and the third one is a kind of “the empire strikes back”. Many scenes of the first part come again but in a mirrored version; now Alex is the victim. ”A Clockwork Orange represents the director’s most complete experiment in presenting cinematic material in a subjective mode. (Falsetto, A Narrative and Stylistic Analysis, p. 90) Therefore other characteristics of the film, especially the 1st person voice over, or the point of view shots, are very important to mention in terms of creating this subjectivity. But one of the most important aspects in the film’s subjectivity and theatricality is Alex’s performance. Also the expressionist décor and lightning plays its important part in the film. The expressionistic style is deeply connected with elements of theatricality, in particular through the performance of the actors. Before analyzing “A Clockwork Orange” concerning these elements, I will describe the development of the German expressionism and its historical context in general. After that I will point out the development of theatricality in cinema and in what relation theater stands to cinema.

A Clockwork Orange in the Context of Subculture

Imprint: Copyright © 2003 GRIN Verlag, Open Publishing GmbH ISBN:
9783638554985 This book at GRIN: http://www.grin.com/en/e-book/62218/a-
clockwork-orange-in-the-context-of-subculture Maren Volkmann "A Clockwork
Orange" in the ...

Author: Maren Volkmann

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638554988

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 18

View: 925

Seminar paper from the year 2003 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,7, Ruhr-University of Bochum, course: Englisches Seminar: Subcultures in Post-War Britain, 14 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In 1974 - just two years after it had opened - the movie “A Clockwork Orange” by Stanley Kubrick was banned from Bristish screens. It was Kubrick himself who decided to withdraw the film from distribution in the UK. Since Kubrick received death threats and threatening phone calls he hoped that the controversary would subside with the fading of memory. The film had been blamed for several violent acts and Kubrick and Anthony Burgess, the writer of the novel, were made responsible for them. In fact, the film caused a moral panic because of its violence. However, it seems interesting to me who is behind all this violence. I want to analyse how Alex and his droogs define themselves. Are they rebels without a cause and if not, what are they rebelling against? I will try to take a look at the book and the film in context of subculture: how did subculture influence the works of Burgess and Kubrick, how is subculture presented in their works and how did they influence subculture afterwards?

Portraits of the Artist in A Clockwork Orange

Author: Anthony Burgess

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Adolescent psychotherapy

Page: 268

View: 780


Notebook

College Ruled Color Paperback. Size: 6 inches x 9 inches. 55 sheets (110 pages for writing). Alternative Movie Poster A Clockwork Orange. 157387568987

Author: AlternativesWD Notebook

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781709347245

Category:

Page: 110

View: 121

College Ruled Color Paperback. Size: 6 inches x 9 inches. 55 sheets (110 pages for writing). Alternative Movie Poster A Clockwork Orange. 157387568987

Gale Researcher Guide for A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess s Black Comedy 1962 and Stanley Kubrick s Violent Grotesque 1971

These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Author: James Fenwick

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1535852852

Category: Study Aids

Page: 9

View: 206

Gale Researcher Guide for: A Clockwork Orange: Anthony Burgess's Black Comedy (1962) and Stanley Kubrick's Violent Grotesque (1971) is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Nadsat in A Clockwork Orange

Stanley Edgar Hyman suggests that "perhaps the most fascinating thing about the book is its language". I agree with him and therefore I set myself to examine this special language called Nadsat in my term paper.

Author: Kathrin Vogler

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3640522346

Category:

Page: 32

View: 145

Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,3, University of Bamberg (Lehrstuhl fur Englische Literaturwissenschaft), course: Literature into Film - The Case of Stanley Kubrick, language: English, comment: Da es in meiner Arbeit um Sprache geht, habe ichin sehr nah am Originaltext gearbeitet, und viele Zitate in meine Argumentation eingebettet. Dies brachte mir sowohl positive als auch negative Kritik des Dozenten ein: "Besonderes Lob verdient dein sicherer Umgang mit direkten Zitaten aus der Primarquelle. Verstosse gegen das Style Sheet unterlaufen dir kaum. Einzig der Grund fur die geringe Verwendung von Sekundarliteratur leuchtet nicht ein." Also vielleicht einfach etwas umfassender recherchieren..., abstract: The dystopian novel A Clockwork Orange, written by Anthony Burgess, was published in 1962. Stanley Edgar Hyman suggests that "perhaps the most fascinating thing about the book is its language." I agree with him and therefore I set myself to examine this special language called Nadsat in my term paper. The second chapter deals with important features of Nadsat, e.g. its origin. Herein I will touch upon Burgess's inspiration to create a new language for his novel and point out languages that contributed to the evolution of Nadsat. Ongoing I will go further into the question whether Nadsat can be considered being slang by giving a definition of slang, describing reasons for this linguistic phenomenon and naming typical features of it. Furthermore I will have a look at particular words, phrases and motives which are frequently repeated in the novel and explain the reasons for that. The last feature I will pay attention to is how Nadsat handles sexuality. The concern of the third chapter is to find out which function Nadsat holds in the novel. Herein I will distinguish between the language of a criminal and the language of an aesthete with regard to the main character Alex. The fourth and last"

A Clockwork Orange The presentation and the impact of violence in the novel and in the film

Or is there something more in the story, that makes it indispensable to present violence in the extreme way Burgess and Kubrick did? This text will explain the function and the intention of presenting violence in "A Clockwork Orange".

Author: Thomas von der Heide

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638506819

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 18

View: 235

Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,0, University of Cologne (Institut für Anglistik), course: Novels and their film adaptations, 9 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: After the release of Stanley Kubrick's film version of "A Clockwork Orange" in 1971, Anthony Burgess's original novel of 1962 and the film were obstinately criticised to be senselessly brutal and it was (and is) said (until today) that both Burgess and Kubrick glorified violence with their works. Although in "A Clockwork Orange", a lot of different themes are dealt with - for example politics, music, art or themes of philosophical nature - the violence in the book and on screen are the most concerned about things when critics write about "A Clockwork Orange". But not only critics, also 'normal' readers (or viewers) regard the violence to be the most remarkable thing about the whole book (or movie). One simply has to look at the website of the internet-bookstore 'Amazon' (www.amazon.de) to see that the main part of the readers' reviews for the book by Anthony Burgess comment on the violence and the brutal crimes committed by the story's protagonists: Alex DeLarge and his 'droogs'. It is interesting that most of the readers that commented on the book also gave a statement about Kubrick's film adaptation. It looks like the whole discussion about violence in "A Clockwork Orange" really first came up when Stanley Kubrick's movie version hit the theatres. But why this violence? Does it stand for itself? Are rape and murder obeyed fetishes of Burgess and Kubrick? Or is there something more in the story, that makes it indispensable to present violence in the extreme way Burgess and Kubrick did? This text will explain the function and the intention of presenting violence in "A Clockwork Orange". It will show the differences between the way of presenting violence in the original novel and the film version and why author and director decided to portray the protagonists' brutality in unlike ways, including the impact they have on the reader and the viewer. This text will conclude that in the novel and the film version, violence in "A Clockwork Orange" serves to discuss other and more important themes included in the story.

Linguistic Analysis of the New Vocabulary in Anthony Burgess A Clockwork Orange

In this essay I will survey these unusual words and try to expose if they are phonetically, morphologically, syntactically or semantically different from "real" English words or if they could be called Anglicism according to one of the ...

Author: Sandra Beyer

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638759636

Category:

Page: 36

View: 908

Seminar paper from the year 2000 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 2 (B), University of Tubingen (English Seminar), course: Introduction to English linguistics, 5 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: double spaced., abstract: Perhaps the most remarkable thing about the present extract from Anthony Burgess "A Clockwork Orange" is its language. Alex, the writer of the book, uses a great number of unusual words that seem to be freely invented by the author. By having a closer look at them, it can be noted that many of them have their origin in the Russian language. In this essay I will survey these unusual words and try to expose if they are phonetically, morphologically, syntactically or semantically different from "real" English words or if they could be called Anglicism according to one of the above topics. Therefore I am going to try to give a phonetic transcription of some of the new words and their corresponding Russian expressions and compare them. Then I am going to have a closer look at the word order of the present extract and try to put the new words into their corresponding syntactical categories. I will as well show how the sentences are connected and what lexical or grammatical properties make the extract coherent. In addition I am going to specify some of the Anglicism in the text and intend to explain how they are built .I also will try to make clear the thematic roles of one example sentence to facilitate its interpretation. Finally I am going to present what in my opinion could be said about the author's background and education, according to the text."

Rape and Revenge Films Film Guide

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Books, LLC

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN: 9781155257112

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 72

View: 352

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (films not included). Pages: 72. Chapters: A Certain Sacrifice, A Clockwork Orange, Inseminoid, The Last House on the Left, I Spit on Your Grave, A Time to Kill, Rape! 13th Hour, Baise-moi, Death Wish, Straightheads, Savage Streets, The Hills Have Eyes, Irr versible, Sudden Impact, The House on the Edge of the Park, Gothika, Death Wish II, Bawandar, The Virgin Spring, Teeth, Brotherhood of Death, Savage Vengeance, Vulgar, Sleepers, Thriller - A Cruel Picture, Eye for an Eye, Arang, Ms. 45, Bad Reputation, The Horseman, Jaago, Red, White & Blue, Seed, Mother's Day, Blood Night: The Legend of Mary Hatchet, The Witch Who Came From the Sea, Silent Witness, Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects, Tyrannosaur, 7 Days, Dispara!, The Whore, Highwaymen, Lisa, Lisa, Lipstick, Festival of Lights, Fight for Your Life, Object of Obsession, Hannie Caulder, Red Swastik, The Graduates of Malibu High, Gutterballs, Ivide Thudangunnu, Ee Sabdam Innathe Sabdam, Descent, Freeze Me, Rain: The Terror Within..., Fair Game, The Hungry Rabbit Jumps, Zakhmi Aurat, Insiang. Excerpt: A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 British darkly satirical science fiction film adaptation of Anthony Burgess's 1962 novel of the same name. This cinematic adaptation was produced, directed, and written by Stanley Kubrick. It features disturbing, violent images, to facilitate social commentary about psychiatry, youth gangs, and other contemporary social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian, future Britain. Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the main character is a charismatic, psychopathic delinquent whose pleasures are classical music (especially Beethoven), rape, and so-called 'ultra-violence'. He leads a small gang of thugs (Pete, Georgie, and Dim), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian, "friend," "buddy"). The film tells the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, an...

A Study Guide for Anthony Burgess s A Clockwork Orange

A Study Guide for Anthony Burgess's "A Clockwork Orange," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; ...

Author: Gale, Cengage Learning

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1410335631

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 15

View: 834

A Study Guide for Anthony Burgess's "A Clockwork Orange," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

Stanley Kubrick

NARRATIVE REVERSAL, REPETITION AND POINTS OF CONVERGENCE A
Clockwork Orange Our next example of narrative organization is Kubrick's 1971
adaptation of the Anthony Burgess novel, A Clockwork Orange. The scene ...

Author: Mario Falsetto

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275969745

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 204

View: 830

Studies the style and themes of the films of Stanley Kubrick.

Waiting for the End

"double" Ending By Misunderstanding: Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange
Anthony Burgess's novella/1 Clockwork Orange — or perhaps more precisely,
Oranges — has become a curiously problematical text, apparently through the ...

Author: Earl G. Ingersoll

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838641538

Category: Fiction

Page: 286

View: 189

Waiting for the End examines two dozen contemporary novels within the context of a half century of theorizing about the function of ending in narrative. That theorizing about ending generated a powerful dynamic a quarter-century ago with the advent of feminist criticism of masculinist readings of the role played by ending in fiction. Feminists such as Theresa de Lauretis in 1984 and more famously Susan Winnett in her 1991 PMLA essay, Coming Unstrung, were leading voices in a swelling chorus of theorist pointing out the masculinist bias of ending in narrative. With the entry of feminist readings of ending, it became inevitable that criticism of fiction would become gendered through the recognition of difference transcending a simple binary of female/male to establish a spectrum of masculine to feminine endings, regardless of the sex of the writer. Accordingly, Waiting for the End examines pairs of novels - one pair by Margaret Atwood and one by Ian McEwan - to demonstrate how a writer can offer endings at either end of the gender spectrum.

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick

This is the case in several of Kubrick's films, but especially in his treatment of
Anthony Burgess's dystopic classic A Clockwork Orange (1971).1 In what follows,
I examine Kubrick's films with a single question in mind: what is his position on
the ...

Author: Jerold Abrams

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081317256X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 634

In the course of fifty years, director Stanley Kubrick produced some of the most haunting and indelible images on film. His films touch on a wide range of topics rife with questions about human life, behavior, and emotions: love and sex, war, crime, madness, social conditioning, and technology. Within this great variety of subject matter, Kubrick examines different sides of reality and unifies them into a rich philosophical vision that is similar to existentialism. Perhaps more than any other philosophical concept, existentialism—the belief that philosophical truth has meaning only if it is chosen by the individual—has come down from the ivory tower to influence popular culture at large. In virtually all of Kubrick’s films, the protagonist finds himself or herself in opposition to a hard and uncaring world, whether the conflict arises in the natural world or in human institutions. Kubrick’s war films (Fear and Desire, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket) examine how humans deal with their worst fears—especially the fear of death—when facing the absurdity of war. Full Metal Jacket portrays a world of physical and moral change, with an environment in continual flux in which attempting to impose order can be dangerous. The film explores the tragic consequences of an unbending moral code in a constantly changing universe. Essays in the volume examine Kubrick’s interest in morality and fate, revealing a Stoic philosophy at the center of many of his films. Several of the contributors find his oeuvre to be characterized by skepticism, irony, and unfettered hedonism. In such films as A Clockwork Orange and 2001: A Space Odyssey, Kubrick confronts the notion that we will struggle against our own scientific and technological innovations. Kubrick’s films about the future posit that an active form of nihilism will allow humans to accept the emptiness of the world and push beyond it to form a free and creative view of humanity. Taken together, the essays in The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick are an engaging look at the director’s stark vision of a constantly changing moral and physical universe. They promise to add depth and complexity to the interpretation of Kubrick’s signature films.