A Room with a View

The love of a young British woman named Lucy Honeychurch for a British expatriate living in Italy is condemned by her stuffy, middle-class guardians, who prefer an eligible man of their own choosing.

Author: Edward Morgan Forster

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0141183292

Category: Fiction

Page: 206

View: 150

The love of a young British woman named Lucy Honeychurch for a British expatriate living in Italy is condemned by her stuffy, middle-class guardians, who prefer an eligible man of their own choosing.

A Room with a View

Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a humorous critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985.

Author: E. M. Forster

Publisher: East West Studio

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 204

View: 579

A Room with a View is a 1908 novel by English writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman in the restrained culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a humorous critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985. The Modern Library ranked A Room with a View 79th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century (1998).

A Room With a View Diversion Classics

Featuring an appendix of discussion questions, the Diversion Classics edition is ideal for use in book groups and classrooms.

Author: E.M. Forster

Publisher: Diversion Books

ISBN: 1682306453

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 808

Featuring an appendix of discussion questions, the Diversion Classics edition is ideal for use in book groups and classrooms. Lucy Honeychurch journeys from England to Italy on holiday hoping to broaden her world, but it’s not the beauty of Florence that she falls in love with. No, trapped in a hotel populated by nothing but fellow Britons, it’s hard for Lucy to experience Italy at all. To make matters worse, the room with the view she was promised isn’t available. Overhearing her dismay, a father and son duo offer to switch rooms with her. It is a generous gesture met with revulsion from Lucy’s suffocating chaperone, for to accept would put them in a compromising position and be a major social gaffe. Touched by the kindness of it and for the first time in her life questioning the barriers of her social standing, Lucy develops a fondness for the two uncouth gentlemen. In fact, George Emerson, younger of the two, might be the only spot of joy Lucy has in Florence. No sooner does Lucy find herself falling for George, who values her mind and spirit, when she is whisked away to Rome. There, she meets Cecil Vyse who, though domineering, pompous, and snide, matches her social standing and proposes. Lucy, thinking she is making the most practical choice, is ready to settle for Cecil. But when George moves closer to her and confesses his true feelings, Lucy must choose between her true desires and that which she was taught was best her entire life. For more classic titles like this, visit www.diversionbooks.com/ebooks/diversion-classics

E M Forster s A Room with a View The Attitude of English People Abroad

This is due to the fact that they do not fit into the Italian environment because of their affected behaviour.

Author: Mieke Schüller

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638423190

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 18

View: 934

Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,0, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Seminar für Englische Philologie: Forschungs- und Lehrbereich Anglistik), course: The British and the Continent, 8 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The novel A Room with a View by Edward Morgan Forster was published in 1908. It is considered as one of Forster’s major novels, and “[i]t is probably his most well-liked novel, perhaps because (with the dubious exception ofMaurice)it is the only one to have a happy ending” (Cavaliero 93). His novelsWhere Angels Fear to TreadandA Room with a Vieware often referred to as Forster’s ‘Italian novels’. Immediately after his return from Italy and Greece Edward Morgan Forster took up the work with a novel that can be considered as the prototype ofA Room with a View.This work is known as the ‘Lucy novel’ or the ‘Lucy fragments’. But he stopped working on it for some time, and a few years passed before he dealt again with it. Only “[i]nA Room with a ViewForster takes up the fragments contrasting Italy and England which are found in the early ‘Lucy novels’ and brings them to a successful conclusion” (Cavaliero 93). The critic on the constrictive and rigid rules of social life in English society has often been an issue discussed by Edward Morgan Forster, and it is a central issue inA Room with a View.Furthermore Forster calls attention to the behaviour of the English people abroad. He introduces very different characters in order to show different points of view and behaviours. It is interesting that most of the English tourists described inA Room with a Vieware more or less presented as unpleasant people. This is due to the fact that they do not fit into the Italian environment because of their affected behaviour. By describing the behaviour of the English tourists and residents at Florence Edward Morgan Forster reveals a lot about English mentality, and he sometimes overtly criticizes it. As Forster himself travelled Italy and Greece, it can be assumed that he made experiences and acquaintances that served as a model for some of the situations and characters described inA Room with a View.Forster clearly distanced himself from this kind of people, or more precisely, tourists. Edward Morgan Forster offers an interesting point of view to the reader, because he was English himself, but nevertheless critically observed the attitude of his fellow countrymen. Furthermore, the behaviour of the English tourists in Italy might be considered as representative for the attitude of the English people towards the Continent, and therefore the topic of this research paper fits into the context of “The British and the Continent”.

A Room with a View and Howards End

Two novels examining Edwardian English society tell of the dilemma of Lucy Honeychurch who must decide whether to follow her heart or to follow the expectations of her snobbish guardians, and recounts the conflicts between the wealthy ...

Author: Edward Morgan Forster

Publisher: Signet

ISBN: 9780451521415

Category: Fiction

Page: 449

View: 659

Two novels examining Edwardian English society tell of the dilemma of Lucy Honeychurch who must decide whether to follow her heart or to follow the expectations of her snobbish guardians, and recounts the conflicts between the wealthy Wilcox family and th

A Room With A View

In Santa Croce with No Baedeker It was pleasant to wake up in Florence, to open the eyes upon a bright bare room, with a floor of red tiles which look clean though they are not; with a painted ceiling whereon pink griffins and blue amorini ...

Author: E. M. Forster

Publisher: 谷月社

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 558

In Santa Croce with No Baedeker It was pleasant to wake up in Florence, to open the eyes upon a bright bare room, with a floor of red tiles which look clean though they are not; with a painted ceiling whereon pink griffins and blue amorini sport in a forest of yellow violins and bassoons. It was pleasant, too, to fling wide the windows, pinching the fingers in unfamiliar fastenings, to lean out into sunshine with beautiful hills and trees and marble churches opposite, and close below, the Arno, gurgling against the embankment of the road. Over the river men were at work with spades and sieves on the sandy foreshore, and on the river was a boat, also diligently employed for some mysterious end. An electric tram came rushing underneath the window. No one was inside it, except one tourist; but its platforms were overflowing with Italians, who preferred to stand. Children tried to hang on behind, and the conductor, with no malice, spat in their faces to make them let go. Then soldiers appeared—good-looking, undersized men—wearing each a knapsack covered with mangy fur, and a great-coat which had been cut for some larger soldier. Beside them walked officers, looking foolish and fierce, and before them went little boys, turning somersaults in time with the band. The tramcar became entangled in their ranks, and moved on painfully, like a caterpillar in a swarm of ants. One of the little boys fell down, and some white bullocks came out of an archway. Indeed, if it had not been for the good advice of an old man who was selling button-hooks, the road might never have got clear. Over such trivialities as these many a valuable hour may slip away, and the traveller who has gone to Italy to study the tactile values of Giotto, or the corruption of the Papacy, may return remembering nothing but the blue sky and the men and women who live under it. So it was as well that Miss Bartlett should tap and come in, and having commented on Lucy's leaving the door unlocked, and on her leaning out of the window before she was fully dressed, should urge her to hasten herself, or the best of the day would be gone. By the time Lucy was ready her cousin had done her breakfast, and was listening to the clever lady among the crumbs.

A Room with a View

In common with much of his other writing, this work by the eminent English novelist and essayist E. M. Forster (1879-1970) displays an unusually perceptive view of British society in the early 20th century.

Author: E. M. Forster

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781543128246

Category:

Page: 192

View: 446

In common with much of his other writing, this work by the eminent English novelist and essayist E. M. Forster (1879-1970) displays an unusually perceptive view of British society in the early 20th century. Written in 1908, A Room with a View is a social comedy set in Florence, Italy, and Surrey, England. Its heroine, Lucy Honeychurch, struggling against straitlaced Victorian attitudes of arrogance, narrow-mindedness and snobbery, falls in love-while on holiday in Italy-with the socially unsuitable George Emerson.Caught up in a claustrophobic world of pretentiousness and rigidity, Lucy ultimately rejects her fianc�, Cecil Vyse, and chooses, instead, to wed her true love, the young man whose sense of freedom and lack of artificiality became apparent to her in the Italian pensione where they first met. This classic exploration of passion, human nature and social convention is reprinted here complete and unabridged.

A Room With a View By E M Forster Annotated Unabridged Classic Novel

A Room with a View is a 1908 novel by English writer E. M. Forster. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a humorous critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century.

Author: E M Forster

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 368

View: 750

A Room with a View is a 1908 novel by English writer E. M. Forster. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a humorous critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985.One of English literature's most inspiring love stories. Lucy Honeychurch is a young woman torn between the opposing values of gray old England and vibrant Italy in this unforgettable story of romance and rebellion. On a trip to Florence with her older cousin and chaperone, Lucy becomes enchanted by a freedom unlike any she has known at home. The excitement she feels when she is with George Emerson, a fellow boarder at the Pension Bertolini, is as exhilarating as it is confusing, and their intoxicating kiss in a field of violets threatens to turn her whole world upside down. Back at Windy Corner, her family's Surrey estate, Lucy must finally decide if the power of passion is greater than the force of expectation. Widely recognized as one of the finest novels of the twentieth century, A Room with a View is E. M. Forster's most hopeful work and a truly timeless romance.

A Room with a View

“This is my son,” said the old man; “his name's George. He has a view too.” “Ah,”
said Miss Bartlett, repressing Lucy, who was about to speak. “What I mean,” he
continued, “is that you can have our rooms, and we'll have yours. We'll change.

Author: Edward Morgan Forster

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486284670

Category: Fiction

Page: 172

View: 712

British social comedy examines a young heroine's struggle against strait-laced Victorian attitudes as she rejects the man her family has encouraged her to marry and chooses, instead, a socially unsuitable fellow she met on holiday in Italy. Classic exploration of passion, human nature and social convention.

A Room with a View

“This is my son,” said the old man; “his name's George. He has a view too.” “Ah,”
said Miss Bartlett, repressing Lucy, who was about to speak. “What I mean,” he
continued, “is that you can have our rooms, and we'll have yours. We'll change.

Author: E.M. Forster

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486112667

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 104

British social comedy examines a young heroine's struggle against Victorian attitudes as she rejects the man her family has encouraged her to marry and chooses, instead, a socially unsuitable fellow she met on holiday in Italy.

A Room With A View

A Room With A View is a selection of poems that didn't quite fit into any other
collection. The poems deal with love, life, and happy holidays — feel the
embarrassment of buying a bra in Fitting, empathise with the family confined to
their hotel ...

Author: Lynda Nash

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1291069798

Category:

Page:

View: 285


Study and Revise for AS A level A Room with a View

The central character in A Room with a View is a sensitive person who learns
about life as she gains experience of the world, which is totally in line with the
parameters of the genre. In the traditional Bildungsroman, this search for
knowledge ...

Author: Luke McBratney

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1471853713

Category: Study Aids

Page: 112

View: 925

Enable students to achieve their best grade in AS/A-level English Literature with this year-round course companion; designed to instil in-depth textual understanding as students read, analyse and revise A Room with a View throughout the course. This Study and Revise guide: - Increases students' knowledge of A Room with a View as they progress through the detailed commentary and contextual information written by experienced teachers and examiners - Develops understanding of characterisation, themes, form, structure and language, equipping students with a rich bank of textual examples to enhance their coursework and exam responses - Builds critical and analytical skills through challenging, thought-provoking questions and tasks that encourage students to form their own personal responses to the text - Extends learning and prepares students for higher-level study by introducing critical viewpoints, comparative references to other literary works and suggestions for independent research - Helps students maximise their exam potential using clear explanations of the Assessment Objectives, sample student answers and examiner insights - Improves students' extended writing techniques through targeted advice on planning and structuring a successful essay

A Room with a View By E M Forster

Summer Street lay deep in the woods, and she had stopped where a footpath
diverged from the highroad. ... they had gone a dozen yards. "I had got an idea—I
dare say wrongly—that you feel more at home with me in a room." "A room?

Author: E. M. Forster

Publisher: BookRix

ISBN: 3730964534

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 267

View: 221

A Room with a View is a 1908 novel by English writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman in the repressed culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant-Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985.

A Room with a View

In some editions, an appendix to the novel is given entitled "A View without a Room," written by Forster in 1958 as to what occurred between Lucy and George after the events of the novel.

Author: E. M. Forster

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781548118808

Category:

Page: 186

View: 578

A Room with a View is a novel by English writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman in the restrained culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant-Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985. The Modern Library ranked A Room with a View 79th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century (1998). The first part of the novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to Florence, at a time when upper middle class English women were starting to lead independent, adventurous lives. Lucy Honeychurch is touring Italy with her overbearing older cousin and chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett, and the novel opens with their complaints about the hotel, "The Pension Bertolini." Their primary concern is that although rooms with a view of the River Arno have been promised for each of them, their rooms instead look over a courtyard. A Mr. Emerson interrupts their "peevish wrangling," offering to swap rooms as he and his son, George Emerson, look over the Arno. This behaviour causes Miss Bartlett some consternation, as it appears impolite. Without letting Lucy speak, Miss Bartlett refuses the offer, looking down on the Emersons because of their unconventional behaviour and thinking it would place her under an "unseemly obligation" towards them. However, another guest at the pension, an Anglican clergyman named Mr. Beebe, persuades the pair to accept the offer, assuring Miss Bartlett that Mr. Emerson only meant to be kind. In some editions, an appendix to the novel is given entitled "A View without a Room," written by Forster in 1958 as to what occurred between Lucy and George after the events of the novel. It is Forster's afterthought of the novel, and he quite clearly states that "I cannot think where George and Lucy live." They were quite comfortable up until the end of World War I, with Charlotte Bartlett leaving them all her money in her will, but the war ruined their happiness according to Forster. George became a conscientious objector, lost his government job but was given non-combatant duties to avoid prison, leaving Mrs Honeychurch deeply upset with her son-in-law. Mr Emerson died during the course of the war, shortly after having an argument with the police about Lucy continuing to play Beethoven (a German composer) on the piano during the war. Eventually they had three children, two girls and a boy, and moved to Carshalton from Highgate to find a home. Despite their wanting to move into Windy Corner after the death of Mrs Honeychurch, Freddy sold the house to support his family as he was "an unsuccessful but prolific doctor."

A Room with a View and Howard s End

Selected by the Modern Library as two of the 100 best novels of all time 'To me,' D. H. Lawerence once wrote to E. M. forster, 'you are the last Englishman.

Author: E.M. Forster

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0679641440

Category: Fiction

Page: 558

View: 462

Selected by the Modern Library as two of the 100 best novels of all time 'To me,' D. H. Lawerence once wrote to E. M. forster, 'you are the last Englishman.' Indeed, Forster's novels offer contemporary readers clear, vibrant portraits of life in Edwardian England. Published in 1908 to both critical and popular acclaim, A Room with a View is a whimsical comedy of manners that owes more to Jane Austen that perhaps any other of his works. The central character is a muddled young girl named Lucy Honeychurch, who runs away from the man who stirs her emotions, remaining engaged to a rich snob. Forster considered it his 'nicest' novel, and today it remains probably his most well liked. Its moral is utterly simple. Throw away your etiquette book and listen to your heart. But it was Forster's next book, Howards End, a story about who would inhabit a charming old country house (and who, in a larger sense, would inherit England), that earned him recognition as a major writer. Centered around the conflict between the wealthy, materialistic Wilcox family and the cultured, idealistic Schlegel sisters-and informed by Forester's famous dictum 'Only connect'-it is full of tenderness towards favorite characters. 'Howards End is a classic English novel . . . superb and wholly cherishable . . . one that admirers have no trouble reading over and over again,' said Alfred Kazin.

A Room with a View by E M Forster Unabridged 1908 Original Version

The first part of the novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to Florence, at a time when upper middle class English women were starting to lead independent, adventurous lives.

Author: E. Forster

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781548700133

Category:

Page: 114

View: 929

A Room with a View is a novel by English writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman in the restrained culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant-Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985. The Modern Library ranked A Room with a View 79th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century (1998). The first part of the novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to Florence, at a time when upper middle class English women were starting to lead independent, adventurous lives. Lucy Honeychurch is touring Italy with her overbearing older cousin and chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett, and the novel opens with their complaints about the hotel, "The Pension Bertolini." Their primary concern is that although rooms with a view of the River Arno have been promised for each of them, their rooms instead look over a courtyard. A Mr. Emerson interrupts their "peevish wrangling," offering to swap rooms as he and his son, George Emerson, look over the Arno. This behaviour causes Miss Bartlett some consternation, as it appears impolite. Without letting Lucy speak, Miss Bartlett refuses the offer, looking down on the Emersons because of their unconventional behaviour and thinking it would place her under an "unseemly obligation" towards them. However, another guest at the pension, an Anglican clergyman named Mr. Beebe, persuades the pair to accept the offer, assuring Miss Bartlett that Mr. Emerson only meant to be kind. In some editions, an appendix to the novel is given entitled "A View without a Room," written by Forster in 1958 as to what occurred between Lucy and George after the events of the novel. It is Forster's afterthought of the novel, and he quite clearly states that "I cannot think where George and Lucy live." They were quite comfortable up until the end of World War I, with Charlotte Bartlett leaving them all her money in her will, but the war ruined their happiness according to Forster. George became a conscientious objector, lost his government job but was given non-combatant duties to avoid prison, leaving Mrs Honeychurch deeply upset with her son-in-law. Mr Emerson died during the course of the war, shortly after having an argument with the police about Lucy continuing to play Beethoven (a German composer) on the piano during the war. Eventually they had three children, two girls and a boy, and moved to Carshalton from Highgate to find a home. Despite their wanting to move into Windy Corner after the death of Mrs Honeychurch, Freddy sold the house to support his family as he was "an unsuccessful but prolific doctor."

A Study Guide for E M Forster s A Room with a View

This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more.

Author: Gale, Cengage Learning

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1410356949

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 30

View: 287

A Study Guide for E. M. Forster's "A Room with a View," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

A Room with a View

The novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to the city of Renaissance art.

Author: E.m. Forster

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781523640492

Category:

Page: 240

View: 241

The novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to the city of Renaissance art. It was a period when middle class English women were starting to lead independent lives. Lucy Honeychurch is touring Italy with her overbearing cousin and chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett. The novel opens with their complaints about the hotel, "The Pension Bertolini." Their primary concern is that although rooms with a view of the River Arno have been promised for each of them, their rooms instead look over a courtyard. A Mr. Emerson interrupts their ongoing verbal complaints, offering to exchange rooms with them, as he and his son George Emerson have rooms that look over the Arno. This behavior causes Miss Bartlett some concern, as it appears impolite. Without letting Lucy speak, Miss Bartlett refuses the offer, looking down on the Emersons because of their unconventional behavior and thinking it would place her under an obligation towards them. However, another guest at the pension, an Anglican clergyman by the name of Mr. Beebe, persuades the pair to accept the offer, assuring Miss Bartlett that Mr. Emerson only meant to be kind.

A Room with a View

The first part of the novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to Florence, at a time when upper middle class English women were starting to lead independent, adventurous lives.

Author: E M Forster

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781511653435

Category:

Page: 198

View: 705

A Room with a View A Romance of Edwardian Era England Classic Literature E. M. Forster A Room with a View is a 1908 novel by English writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman in the repressed culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant-Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985. The Modern Library ranked A Room with a View 79th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century (1998). The first part of the novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to Florence, at a time when upper middle class English women were starting to lead independent, adventurous lives. Lucy Honeychurch is touring Italy with her overbearing older cousin and chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett, and the novel opens with their complaints about the hotel, "The Pension Bertolini." Their primary concern is that although rooms with a view of the River Arno have been promised for each of them, their rooms instead look over a courtyard. A Mr. Emerson interrupts their "peevish wrangling," offering to swap rooms as he and his son, George Emerson, look over the Arno. This behaviour causes Miss Bartlett some consternation, as it appears impolite. Without letting Lucy speak, Miss Bartlett refuses the offer, looking down on the Emersons because of their unconventional behaviour and thinking it would place her under an "unseemly obligation" towards them. However, another guest at the pension, an Anglican clergyman named Mr. Beebe, persuades the pair to accept the offer, assuring Miss Bartlett that Mr. Emerson only meant to be kind.

A Room With a View

As E. M. Forster tells it, Lucy comes from a family which is overly concerned with respectability, and is over-protected by a spinster named Charlotte Bartlett.

Author: E. M. Forster

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781451563252

Category: Fiction

Page: 160

View: 792

"A Room with a View," by E. M. Forster, depicts a young Englishwoman's adventure trying to come to grips with the conflict between her desires and society's expectations. Lucy Honeychurch is a well-bred young middle class girl on holiday in radiant Florence. As E. M. Forster tells it, Lucy comes from a family which is overly concerned with respectability, and is over-protected by a spinster named Charlotte Bartlett. Under no circumstances will Miss Bartlett allow Lucy to pursue (or even examine) her affection for the handsome young George Emerson--his father is far too unconventional with his modern notions about honesty and freethinking. Determined to forget George, Lucy finally gives in to the repeated proposals of Cecil Vyse, a thoroughly fashionable young gentleman, if not very exciting. And so E. M. Forster sets the stage for "A Room with a View," a splendid satire on the English social strata of the early part of the 20th century when the formal social structure of the Victorian era was beginning to fray at the edges. Vyse is a delightfully drawn male chauvinist; nobody likes him, but everyone is willing to accept him, and Lucy convinces herself that she is in love with him. However, Vyse's own penchant for getting his way by playing rather cruel practical jokes brings the Emersons back into the picture. Confronted by the contrast between the not quite classy but intelligent, thoughtful (and bold) George Emerson and the arrogant, boorish, but elite Cecil Vyse, Lucy finally decides to live as she plays Beethoven, with exciting results. E. M. Forster writes gently and calmly, but with a passion for life and love welling up beneath the surface. "A Room with a View" is a lovely book, vital with the force of a sensitive and empathetic mind. Highly recommended!