Armies of the Napoleonic Era

A wide selection of illustrations and diagrams complements this unique work, which will be of incalculable value as a reference work to serious students of the period, modelers and wargamers.

Author: Digby Smith

Publisher: Schiffer Publishing

ISBN: 9780764319891

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 608

Armies of the Napoleonic Era provides a complete overview of the tactics, organisation, uniforms, equipment, weapons and actions fought during those dynamic years 1792-1815, when revolutionary France reshaped Europe before being forced back into a more conventional pattern of life. Digby Smith has studied first class source data from many European museums, archives, numerous regimental histories, contemporary official handbooks and private diaries, and has distilled this mass of information into a work covering all the standing armies of the Napoleonic era. Technical data on the artillery of the various states include the chemical make-up of gunpowders, fuzes and incendiary bombs; the dimensions, performances and effects of cannon, howitzers and mortars, shot, shell and canister; and the dimensions, calibre and performance of muskets, carbines, rifles and pistols. The tactics of artillery, cavalry and infantry-are explained and each nation has its own section in which uniform development and regimental history are described. A brief summary of the campaigns and actions in which that nation was involved is also included. An appendix gives an overall summary of all battles and major clashes between 1792-1815. A wide selection of illustrations and diagrams complements this unique work, which will be of incalculable value as a reference work to serious students of the period, modelers and wargamers.

Armies of the Napoleonic Wars

The book will be essential reading and reference for all students of the Napoleonic era.Covers the armies of Austria, Britain, the Confederation of the Rhine, the Duchy of Warsaw, France, the Kingdom of Italy, Portugal, Prussia, Russia and ...

Author: Gregory Fremont-Barnes

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1783032081

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 701

The armies of the Napoleonic Wars fought in a series of devastating campaigns that disturbed the peace of Europe for twelve years, yet the composition, organization and fighting efficiency of these forces receive too little attention. Each force tends to be examined in isolation or in the context of an individual battle or campaign or as the instrument of a famous commander. Rarely have these armies been studied together in a single volume as they are in this authoritative and fascinating reassessment edited by Gregory Fremont-Barnes.Leading experts on the Napoleonic Wars have been specially commissioned to produce chapters on each of the armed forces that took part in this momentous era in European history. The result is a vivid comparative portrait of ten of the most significant armies of the period, and of military service and warfare in the early nineteenth century. The book will be essential reading and reference for all students of the Napoleonic era.Covers the armies of Austria, Britain, the Confederation of the Rhine, the Duchy of Warsaw, France, the Kingdom of Italy, Portugal, Prussia, Russia and Spain.

Armies of the Napoleonic Era

Descriptions of the European armies during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Author: Otto von Pivka

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Armies

Page: 272

View: 151

Descriptions of the European armies during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Spanish Armies of the Napoleonic Wars

This book gives an overview of Spain's confused position during the Napoleonic Era, caught between the competing interests of Britain and France.

Author: Otto von Pivka

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

ISBN: 9780850452433

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 488

Despite Napoleon's clear advantage in the Peninsular War, the Spanish Army was never completely destroyed. Wrought by poor leadership and insufficient training, Spain's armies persisted in the fight against imperial France. This book gives an overview of Spain's confused position during the Napoleonic Era, caught between the competing interests of Britain and France. The book focuses primarily on the uniforms of the Spanish Army in the period before 1808 and during the war years as the Army of King Joseph, as well as the infantry uniforms of 1814-15. Numerous illustrations and eight color plates vividly depict the uniforms of this often-underestimated force.

Armies of the Napoleonic Era

Author: Digby George Smith

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 272

View: 677


The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars 2

This companion volume to Men-at-Arms 185 examines the organisation, tactics and uniforms of the Russian cavalry during this dynamic and turbulent period, covering Cuirassiers, Dragoons, Hussars, Uhlans, Mounted Jägers and the Lifeguard, as ...

Author: Philip Haythornthwaite

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1782007040

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 539

During the Napoleonic era, Russia possessed a vast force of cavalry, forming a greater percentage than that of most European armies. This stemmed partly from their service against the Turks, who had huge numbers of troops, and partly from the fact that much Russian terrain was suitable for the manoeuvre of large bodies of cavalry. This companion volume to Men-at-Arms 185 examines the organisation, tactics and uniforms of the Russian cavalry during this dynamic and turbulent period, covering Cuirassiers, Dragoons, Hussars, Uhlans, Mounted Jägers and the Lifeguard, as well as the Opolchenie militia and Cossacks.

The Poles and Saxons During the Napoleonic Wars

From the desperate actions of a handful of Poles defending a Spanish fortress to vast armies facing off to determine the fate of Europe, this lavishly illustrated work is researched from sources previously unavailable to any but the most ...

Author: George F. Nafziger

Publisher: Da Capo Press, Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 605

A complete and thorough study of the Poles and Saxons during the wars of Napoleon, including the organization, uniforms, and battlefield accounts. From the desperate actions of a handful of Poles defending a Spanish fortress to vast armies facing off to determine the fate of Europe, this lavishly illustrated work is researched from sources previously unavailable to any but the most ardent historian.

The Hanoverian Army of the Napoleonic Wars

Complemented by numerous illustrations and photographs, plus eight full page colour plates, this text explores the uniforms and organization of the army of the Electorate of Hanover and the King's German Legion.

Author: Peter Hofschröer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1780965176

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 229

Of all the armies of the German States, that of Hanover remains of greatest interest to the British reader due to the close links between the crowns of the two states. Throughout the Napoleonic era Britain and Hanover had the same head of state, George III. Symbolic of their close relationship, the Hanoverian Army wore uniforms and used equipment largely similar to those used by the British Army. Complemented by numerous illustrations and photographs, plus eight full page colour plates, this text explores the uniforms and organization of the army of the Electorate of Hanover and the King's German Legion.

Polish Soldiers During the Napoleonic Wars

The book are based to several finest artwork of various famous Polish artist as Jan Chelmisnski, Julius Kosacks, Jozef Brandt Bronislaw Gembarzewski and other

Author: Luca Stefano Cristini

Publisher:

ISBN: 9788893273459

Category: History

Page: 108

View: 189

Army of the Duchy of Warsaw refers to the military forces of the Duchy of Warsaw during the Napoleonic era. The book are based to several finest artwork of various famous Polish artist as Jan Chelmisnski, Julius Kosacks, Jozef Brandt Bronislaw Gembarzewski and other

Armies of the Napoleonic Wars

The levels of political and social change experienced by the armies of the Low
Countries during the Napoleonic era were daunting to say the least , and many of
the problems in organization , equipment and morale were to be expected .

Author: Chris McNab

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 733

"The Napoleonic Wars saw almost two decades of brutal fighting, from the frozen wastelands of Russia to the wilderness of the Peninsula, and from Egypt to the bloody battlefield of Waterloo. In the almost two decades of battle, Napoleon led his Grande Armee and his allies against a varying coalition of nations. This book provides a comprehensive guide to all the major armies of the Napoleonic Wars - France, Britain, Austria, Prussia, Russia, Spain, and Portugal - as well as many of the minor powers. The changes in the armies over the period, the organization, the infantry, cavalry, and artillery are all covered, along with illustrations of the often glorious uniforms worn into battle." --Book Jacket.

Napoleonic Wars

The essential bibliography of the Napoleonic Wars

Author: Frederick C. Schneid

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1597975788

Category: History

Page: 121

View: 222

The essential bibliography of the Napoleonic Wars

The Portuguese Army of the Napoleonic Wars 2

René Chartrand. Shako, 6th Cazadores Battalion. Black felt and leather, brass
numeral and bugle horn badge, blue and red cockade, green pompon. The
badges are of a latter date than the Napoleonic era but generally similar to earlier
ones.

Author: René Chartrand

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472800338

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 274

Osprey are confident in boasting that this remarkable three-part study will transform the research material available to the English-speaking student of the Peninsular War. Most know that Wellington's Portuguese troops were praised as the 'fighting cocks' of his army; fewer appreciate that they represented between half and one-third of his entire forces. Similarly, most uniform historians have been limited to a few half-understood paintings by Dighton, and brief notes from secondary sources. René Chartrand's recent primary research in Portuguese and British archives now offers a wealth of important new material. This second volume covers the light infantry, cavalry, specialist corps and several supporting military and civilian departments

Conscription in the Napoleonic Era

This edited volume explores conscription in the Napoleonic era, tracing the roots of European conscription and exploring the many methods that states used to obtain the manpower they needed to prosecute their wars.

Author: Donald Stoker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134270100

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 746

This edited volume explores conscription in the Napoleonic era, tracing the roots of European conscription and exploring the many methods that states used to obtain the manpower they needed to prosecute their wars. The levée-en-masse of the French Revolution has often been cited as a ‘Revolution in Military Affairs’, but was it truly a ‘revolutionary’ break with past European practices of raising armies, or an intensification of the scope and scale of practices already inherent in the European military system? This international collection of scholars demonstrate that European conscription has far deeper roots than has been previously acknowledged, and that its intensification during the Napoleonic era was more an ‘evolutionary’ than ‘revolutionary’ change. This book will be of much interest to students of Military History, Strategic Studies, Strategic History and European History.

The Grande Arm e and Wellington s Scum

*Includes pictures Nearly 50 years after Napoleon met his Waterloo, generals across the West continued to study his tactics and engage their armies the same way armies fought during the Napoleonic Era.

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 116

View: 543

*Includes pictures Nearly 50 years after Napoleon met his Waterloo, generals across the West continued to study his tactics and engage their armies the same way armies fought during the Napoleonic Era. Despite advances in military technology and the advent of railroads for transportation, all of which made defensive warfare more effective, acclaimed military geniuses like Robert E. Lee used flank attacks and infantry charges against superior numbers in an effort to win decisive victories, and it would not be until World War I that concepts of modern warfare made the Napoleonic Era of the early 19th century outdated. For those questioning why generals continued using tactics from the Napoleonic Era even as technology changed the battlefield, the Battle of Austerlitz may provide the best answer. Napoleon is regarded as one of history's greatest generals, and Austerlitz was his greatest victory. In 1805, Britain, Austria, and Russia allied together to form the Third Coalition against the French, and the Third Coalition's forces consisted of armies from Austria and Russia, with Britain providing naval support as well as its financial powers. Napoleon had already defeated and mostly destroyed an Austrian army in October at Ulm before it could link up with the Russians, setting the stage for the Battle of Austerlitz to be the culmination of the war against the Third Coalition as a whole in early December. The influence Austerlitz had on Europe's political and military situation cannot be overstated. The Third Coalition's defeat led to the dissolution of the Habsburg Empire, allowed France to redraw the map of Central Europe, and ultimately put into place the chain of events that would lead to France's subsequent wars. Furthermore, Austerlitz set the model that every general hoped to emulate in battle, and the results were undoubtedly on Napoleon's mind when he tried to use the same movement strategies in an attempt to keep Prussian and British armies from linking together at the Battle of Waterloo nearly 10 years after Austerlitz. Napoleon's enemies would famously say he was worth 50,000 men in the field, but the simple truth is he wasn't able to dominate Europe on his own. In fact, the subordinates and soldiers underneath him participated in several of history's most famous battles and charted the course of Napoleon's rise and fall. No single factor can account for these victories, which could be attributed to a combination of high morale, a truly egalitarian approach to promotion from the ranks, a radical army organization, and the inspired leadership of Napoleon, all of which combined to make the Grande Armée virtually unbeatable for the first few years of its existence. The 18th century was a tumultuous period for the British army, one often overlooked in popular accounts of British history. It began with the formal unification of Britain, a period of great success for the nation's armies, which were led by one of Britain's greatest generals, the Duke of Marlborough. This was followed by a period of global activity and military reform as the British Empire expanded. Though naval power played a greater part in this success, it led to new obligations and challenges for the army. Even as the empire soared to new heights, the 18th century was one that was initially marked by triumph but ended in failure and decline. The late 1770s and early 1780s brought about a disastrous war for control of the American colonies, during which the British Army was ultimately defeated by colonial militiamen allied with French forces. In the aftermath came a period of decline and complacency, leaving the nation ill-prepared for war with Napoleon and France. Nonetheless, Wellington famously referred to his men as the scum of the earth, even as he took pride in their skill and successes. This was an army that took rough material and shaped it into something refined and effective.

The Napoleonic Era in Europe

Author: Jacques Léon Godechot

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Europe

Page: 340

View: 876


The British Army Against Napoleon

Other books may tell you how many regiments were sent on the expedition to Hanover in 1805, but The British Army against Napoleon will tell you where every single regiment in the British army was stationed, who were their honorary colonels, ...

Author: Bob Burnham

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 1848325622

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 229

Despite the bewildering number of tomes devoted to the Napoleonic wars, much basic data as been hitherto unavailable to anyone other than the most ardent scholars. McGuigan and Burnham have collected a tremendous treasure trove of information in a readily accessible form. Other books may tell you how many regiments were sent on the expedition to Hanover in 1805, but The British Army against Napoleon will tell you where every single regiment in the British army was stationed, who were their honorary colonels, and give you a list of all the barracks in Britain with the number of men they were designed to hold. Where else will you find not just the pay of different ranked officers but the amount of income tax they paid, as well as all the other deductions and stoppages that reduced their actual receipts to a fraction of their nominal (and generally quite low) pay? Or pension charts for widows? There are tables that list all the recipients of the honours and awards issued, casualties in action and disease, seniority of officers of the numerous expeditions and campaigns (a matter not just of curiosity but of major significance, for the date of rank of an officer determined who commanded the force and all of its sub-units.) The material in these tables has been collected from countless primary sources and official publications such as the Army List, London Gazette, Wellington s Dispatches, regimental histories, artillery manuals, and handbooks.

Napoleon s Grande Arm e

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading Nearly 50 years after Napoleon met his Waterloo, generals across the West continued to study his tactics and engage their armies the same way armies fought during the ...

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781703395402

Category:

Page: 88

View: 735

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading Nearly 50 years after Napoleon met his Waterloo, generals across the West continued to study his tactics and engage their armies the same way armies fought during the Napoleonic Era. Despite advances in military technology and the advent of railroads for transportation, all of which made defensive warfare more effective, acclaimed military geniuses like Robert E. Lee used flank attacks and infantry charges against superior numbers in an effort to win decisive victories, and it would not be until World War I that concepts of modern warfare made the Napoleonic Era of the early 19th century outdated. For those questioning why generals continued using tactics from the Napoleonic Era even as technology changed the battlefield, the Battle of Austerlitz may provide the best answer. Napoleon is regarded as one of history's greatest generals, and Austerlitz was his greatest victory. In 1805, Britain, Austria, and Russia allied together to form the Third Coalition against the French, and the Third Coalition's forces consisted of armies from Austria and Russia, with Britain providing naval support as well as its financial powers. Napoleon had already defeated and mostly destroyed an Austrian army in October at Ulm before it could link up with the Russians, setting the stage for the Battle of Austerlitz to be the culmination of the war against the Third Coalition as a whole in early December. Despite the smashing victory at Ulm, Napoleon's French army would still be well outnumbered at Austerlitz by a joint Russo-Austrian army in a battle that would also come to be known as the Battle of Three Emperors. Napoleon's enemies would famously say he was worth 50,000 men in the field, but the simple truth is he wasn't able to dominate Europe on his own. In fact, the subordinates and soldiers underneath him participated in several of history's most famous battles and charted the course of Napoleon's rise and fall. The French army which became known as the Grande Armée existed for just 10 years, from 1805 - 1815, and the question of what it was about this army that allowed it to win so many notable victories and to survive defeats which would have destroyed lesser armies has fascinated historians and writers ever since. After all, in terms of equipment, weapons, and battlefield tactics, there was little to distinguish the Grande Armée from other European armies in the early 1800s, but in battles such as Austerlitz (1805), Jena-Auerstedt (1806) and Wagram (1809) it won stunning victories, often against numerically superior enemies. No single factor can account for these victories, which could be attributed to a combination of high morale, a truly egalitarian approach to promotion from the ranks, a radical army organization, and the inspired leadership of Napoleon, all of which combined to make the Grande Armée virtually unbeatable for the first few years of its existence. As noteworthy as those battles all were, Waterloo is the most famous battle in modern history if not all of history, and appropriately so. Gathering an army of 100,000 men, Napoleon marched into what is now Belgium, intent on driving his force between the advancing British army under the Duke of Wellington and the Prussian forces under Marshal Blucher. It was the kind of daring strategy that only Napoleon could pull off, as he had at places like Jena and Austerlitz. At Waterloo, however, it would end disastrously, as Napoleon's armies were unable to dislodge Wellington and unable to keep the Prussians from linking up with the British. The battle would end with the French suffering nearly 60% casualties, the end of Napoleon's reign, and the restructuring of the European map. Simply put, the next 200 years of European history can be traced back to the result of the battle that day in 1815.

Napoleon s Waterloo Army

As with the earlier volumes, this book will appeal to and be enjoyed by a wide readership with special interest for historians, military history enthusiasts, Napoleonic War enthusiasts and re-enactors.” —Firetrench

Author: Paul L. Dawson

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1526705303

Category: History

Page: 696

View: 825

The author of Waterloo: The Truth at Last “sheds new light on the campaign of 1815 and surely will satisfy all with an interest in the Napoleonic Era” (The Napoleonic Historical Society Newsletter). When Napoleon returned to Paris after exile on the Island of Elba, he appealed to the European heads of state to be allowed to rule France in peace. His appeal was rejected and the Emperor of the French knew he would have to fight to keep his throne. In just eight weeks, Napoleon assembled 128,000 soldiers in the French Army of the North and on 15 June moved into Belgium (then a part of the kingdom of the Netherlands). Before the large Russian and Austrian armies could invade France, Napoleon hoped to defeat two coalition armies, an Anglo-Dutch-Belgian-German force under the Duke of Wellington, and a Prussian army led by Prince von Blücher. He nearly succeeded. Paul Dawson’s examination of the troops who fought at Ligny, Quatre-Bras and Waterloo, is based on thousands of pages of French archival documents and translations. With hundreds of photographs of original artifacts, supplemented with scores of lavish color illustrations, and dozens of paintings by the renowned military artist Keith Rocco, Napoleon’s Waterloo Army is the most comprehensive, and extensive, study ever made of the French field army of 1815, and its uniforms, arms and equipment. “Contains many rare and previously unpublished images in the form of full color drawings and photographs of surviving relics. As with the earlier volumes, this book will appeal to and be enjoyed by a wide readership with special interest for historians, military history enthusiasts, Napoleonic War enthusiasts and re-enactors.” —Firetrench

Redcoats

In this landmark book Philip Haythornthwaite traces the career of a British soldier from enlistment, through the key stages of his path through the military system, including combat, all the way to his eventual discharge.

Author: Philip Haythornthwaite

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1781599866

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 331

What was a British soldiers life like during the Napoleonic Wars? How was he recruited and trained? How did he live on home service and during service abroad? And what was his experience of battle? In this landmark book Philip Haythornthwaite traces the career of a British soldier from enlistment, through the key stages of his path through the military system, including combat, all the way to his eventual discharge. His fascinating account shows how varied the recruits of the day were, from urban dwellers and weavers to plowboys and laborers, and they came from all regions of the British Isles including Ireland and Scotland. Some of them may have justified the Duke of Wellingtons famous description of them as the scum of the earth. Yet these common soldiers were capable of extraordinary feats on campaign and on the battlefield that eventually turned the course of the war against Napoleon.

Picton s Division at Waterloo

But what has not been written is an in-depth study of a division, one of the larger formations that made up the armies on that decisive battlefield, and that is exactly the purpose of Philip Haythornthwaites original and highly readable new ...

Author: Philip Haythornthwaite

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473880890

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 609

In the two hundred years since the Battle of Waterloo countless studies examining almost every aspect of this momentous event have been published narratives of the campaign, graphic accounts of key stages in the fighting or of the role played by a regiment or by an individual who was there - an eyewitness. But what has not been written is an in-depth study of a division, one of the larger formations that made up the armies on that decisive battlefield, and that is exactly the purpose of Philip Haythornthwaites original and highly readable new book. He concentrates on the famous Fifth Division, commanded by Sir Thomas Picton, which was a key element in Wellingtons Reserve. The experiences of this division form a microcosm of those of the entire army. Vividly, using a range of first-hand accounts, the author describes the actions of the officers and men throughout this short, intense campaign, in particular their involvement the fighting at Quatre Bras and at Waterloo itself.