Bess of Hardwick

From the author of "The Sisters" comes a chronicle of the most brutal, turbulent, and exuberant period of England's history, and of Bess of Hardwick, who died one of the wealthiest women of her era.

Author: Mary S. Lovell

Publisher: Abacus (UK)

ISBN: 9780349115894

Category: Countesses

Page: 555

View: 605

Bess of Hardwick was one of the most remarkable women of the Tudor era. Gently-born in reduced circumstances, she was married at 15, wedded at 16 and still a virgin. At 19 she married a man more than twice her age, Sir William Cavendish, a senior auditor in King Henry VIII's Court of Augmentations. Responsible for seizing church properties for the crown during the Dissolution, Cavendish enriched himself in the process. During the reign of King Edward VI, Cavendish was the Treasurer to the boy king and sisters and he and Bess moved in the highest levels of society. They had a London home and built Chatsworth House in Derbyshire. After Cavendish's death her third husband was poisoned by his brother. Bess' 4th marriage to the patrician George, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury, Earl Marshall of England, made Bess one of the most important women at court. Her shrewd business acumen was a byword and she was said to have 'a masculine understanding', in that age when women had little education and few legal rights. The Earl's death made her arguably the wealthiest and therefore - next to the Queen - the most powerful woman in the country.

Bess of Hardwick Empire Builder

Using journals, letters, inventories, and account books, Mary S. Lovell tells the passionate, colorful story of an astonishingly accomplished woman, among whose descendants are counted the dukes of Devonshire, Rutland, and Portland, and, on ...

Author: Mary S. Lovell

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393330137

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 608

View: 778

"The best account yet available of this shrewd, enigmatic and remarkable woman."—Sunday Times [London] From the author of The Sisters, a chronicle of the most brutal, turbulent, and exuberant period of England's history. Bess Hardwick, the fifth daughter of an impoverished Derbyshire nobleman, did not have an auspicious start in life. Widowed at sixteen, she nonetheless outlived four monarchs, married three more times, built the great house at Chatsworth, and died one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in English history. In 1527 England was in the throes of violent political upheaval as Henry VIII severed all links with Rome. His daughter, Queen Mary, was even more capricious and bloody, only to be followed by the indomitable and ruthless Gloriana, Elizabeth I. It could not have been more hazardous a period for an ambitious woman; by the time Bess's first child was six, three of her illustrious godparents had been beheaded. Using journals, letters, inventories, and account books, Mary S. Lovell tells the passionate, colorful story of an astonishingly accomplished woman, among whose descendants are counted the dukes of Devonshire, Rutland, and Portland, and, on the American side, Katharine Hepburn.

Bess of Hardwick

The 400-year-old collection, now known as the Hardwick Hall textiles, is the largest collection of tapestry, embroidery, canvaswork, and other textiles to have been preserved by a single private family."--Wikipedia.

Author: David N. Durant

Publisher: Atheneum Books

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 274

View: 395

"Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (c. 1521[1]? 13 February 1608), known as Bess of Hardwick, was the daughter of John Hardwick, of Derbyshire and Elizabeth Leeke, daughter of Thomas Leeke and Margaret Fox. She was married four times, firstly to Robert Barlow, who died in his teens; secondly to the courtier Sir William Cavendish; thirdly to Sir William St Loe; and lastly to George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury, sometime keeper to the captive Mary, Queen of Scots. An accomplished needlewoman, Bess hosted Mary at Chatsworth House for extended periods in 1569, 1570, and 1571, during which time they worked together on the Oxburgh Hangings. In 1601, Bess ordered an inventory of the household furnishings including textiles at her three properties at Chatsworth, Hardwick and Chelsea, which survives, and in her will she bequeathed these items to her heirs to be preserved in perpetuity. The 400-year-old collection, now known as the Hardwick Hall textiles, is the largest collection of tapestry, embroidery, canvaswork, and other textiles to have been preserved by a single private family."--Wikipedia.

Bess Of Hardwick

From the bestselling author of The Mitford Girls: A 'wonderfully researched' (Sunday Express) biography of Bess of Hartwick, the most powerful woman in England next to Queen Elizabeth Bringing 'the Tudor Age to exuberant life' (Hugh ...

Author: Mary S. Lovell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 074811226X

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 128

From the bestselling author of The Mitford Girls: A 'wonderfully researched' (Sunday Express) biography of Bess of Hartwick, the most powerful woman in England next to Queen Elizabeth Bringing 'the Tudor Age to exuberant life' (Hugh Massingberd, Mail on Sunday), Mary S. Lovell tells the story of Bess of Hardwick,, one of the most remarkable women of the Tudor era. Gently-born in reduced circumstances, she was married at 15 and when she was widowed at 16, she was still a virgin. At 19 she married a man more than twice her age, Sir William Cavendish, a senior auditor in King Henry VIII's Court of Augmentations. Responsible for seizing church properties for the crown during the Dissolution, Cavendish enriched himself in the process. During the reign of King Edward VI, Cavendish was the Treasurer to the boy king and sisters, and he and Bess moved in the highest levels of society. They had a London home and built Chatsworth House in Derbyshire. After Cavendish's death her third husband was poisoned by his brother. Bess' fourth marriage to the patrician George, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury, Earl Marshall of England, made Bess one of the most important women at court. Her shrewd business acumen was a byword, and she was said to have 'a masculine understanding', in that age when women had little education and few legal rights. The Earl's death made her arguably the wealthiest, and therefore - next to the Queen - the most powerful woman in the country. 'This wonderfully researched book is an intimate portrait of [Bess's] life and a vivid insight into life in Tudor society' Sunday Express

Bess of Hardwick s Letters

Bess of Hardwick's Letters is the first book-length study of the c. 250 letters to and from the remarkable Elizabethan dynast, matriarch and builder of houses Bess of Hardwick (c. 1527–1608).

Author: Alison Wiggins

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317175123

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 676

Bess of Hardwick's Letters is the first book-length study of the c. 250 letters to and from the remarkable Elizabethan dynast, matriarch and builder of houses Bess of Hardwick (c. 1527–1608). By surveying the complete correspondence, author Alison Wiggins uncovers the wide range of uses to which Bess put letters: they were vital to her engagement in the overlapping realms of politics, patronage, business, legal negotiation, news-gathering and domestic life. Much more than a case study of Bess's letters, the discussions of language, handwriting and materiality found here have fundamental implications for the way we approach and read Renaissance letters. Wiggins offers readings which show how Renaissance letters communicated meaning through the interweaving linguistic, palaeographic and material forms, according to socio-historical context and function. The study goes beyond the letters themselves and incorporates a range of historical sources to situate circumstances of production and reception, which include Account Books, inventories, needlework and textile art and architecture. The study is therefore essential reading for scholars in historical linguistics, historical pragmatics, palaeography and manuscript studies, material culture, English literature and social history.

Bess of Hardwick Empire Builder

Using journals, letters, inventories, and account books, Mary S. Lovell tells the passionate, colorful story of an astonishingly accomplished woman, among whose descendants are counted the dukes of Devonshire, Rutland, and Portland, and, on ...

Author: Mary S. Lovell

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393075796

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 608

View: 555

"The best account yet available of this shrewd, enigmatic and remarkable woman."—Sunday Times [London] From the author of The Sisters, a chronicle of the most brutal, turbulent, and exuberant period of England's history. Bess Hardwick, the fifth daughter of an impoverished Derbyshire nobleman, did not have an auspicious start in life. Widowed at sixteen, she nonetheless outlived four monarchs, married three more times, built the great house at Chatsworth, and died one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in English history. In 1527 England was in the throes of violent political upheaval as Henry VIII severed all links with Rome. His daughter, Queen Mary, was even more capricious and bloody, only to be followed by the indomitable and ruthless Gloriana, Elizabeth I. It could not have been more hazardous a period for an ambitious woman; by the time Bess's first child was six, three of her illustrious godparents had been beheaded. Using journals, letters, inventories, and account books, Mary S. Lovell tells the passionate, colorful story of an astonishingly accomplished woman, among whose descendants are counted the dukes of Devonshire, Rutland, and Portland, and, on the American side, Katharine Hepburn.

Bess of Hardwick and Her Circle

Author: Maud Stepney Rawson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 375

View: 520


Of Household Stuff

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, more famously known as Bess of Hardwick, became one of the most influential women of the Elizabethan age. This book presents a record of the contents of the three houses she lived in.

Author: Santina M. Levey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 71

View: 885

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, more famously known as Bess of Hardwick, became one of the most influential women of the Elizabethan age. This book presents a record of the contents of the three houses she lived in.

Bess of Hardwick

Born the daughter of a country squire, Bess of Hardwick made four marriages which brought her wealth and status.

Author: Lisa Hopkins

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 1526101319

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 509

Born the daughter of a country squire, Bess of Hardwick made four marriages which brought her wealth and status. She built and furnished houses and founded a dynasty which included a granddaughter, Arbella Stuart, who had a claim to the thrones of both England and Scotland.

Bess of Hardwick

Author: Ethel Carleton Williams

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 312

View: 922


Devices and Desires

‘The definitive biography’ Roy Strong The remarkable story of Bess of Hardwick, her ascent through Elizabethan society and the houses she built that shaped British architectural history.

Author: Kate Hubbard

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448190819

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 783

‘The definitive biography’ Roy Strong The remarkable story of Bess of Hardwick, her ascent through Elizabethan society and the houses she built that shaped British architectural history. Born in 1521, Bess of Hardwick, businesswoman, money-lender and property tycoon, lived an astonishing eighty-seven years. Through canny choices, four husbands and a will of steel she rose from country squire’s daughter to Dowager Countess, establishing herself as one of the richest and most powerful women in England, second only to Queen Elizabeth. Bess forged her way not merely by judicious marriage, but by shrewd exploitation of whatever assets each marriage brought. Wealth took concrete form in her passion for building and she oversaw every stage of the construction of her four houses including Hardwick New Hall, her sole surviving building, which stands as a celebration of one woman’s triumphant progress through Elizabethan England. ‘A dynamic portrait of Bess's life...’ BBC History Magazine

Bradwells Histories

Author: Jill Armitage

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781912060627

Category:

Page: 32

View: 729


Bess of Hardwick and Her Circle

Author: Rawson Maud Stepney

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780259727736

Category:

Page:

View: 100


Bess of Hardwick and Her Circle

Author: Maud Stepney Rawson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 375

View: 504


An Investigation Into the Language and Letters of Bess of Hardwick c 1527 1608

The English language was in a state of transition during the Early Modern period, which is defined here as extending from 1500 to 1700.

Author: Imogen Julia Marcus

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 655


Bess of Hardwick Countess of Shrewsbury

Bess of Hardwick rose from obscurity to be one of the richest women in England and a friend of Elizabeth I. Her story is one of determination, grit, ambition and clever management.

Author: Tudor Times

Publisher: Tudor Times Insights (Profile)

ISBN: 9781911190226

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 102

View: 537

Bess of Hardwick rose from obscurity to be one of the richest women in England and a friend of Elizabeth I. Her story is one of determination, grit, ambition and clever management. Born a poor gentleman farmer's daughter, she died a countess and grandmother to a possible heir to the throne. Bess married four times, and was sincerely attached to all her husbands, although her final marriage disintegrated under unbearable pressures. Like most Tudor women, Bess never left England, but she travelled regularly between her native Derbyshire and London, and to the estates of her third husband in Somerset, as well as with the court. Many of her journeys related to supervision of her magnificent constructions at Chatsworth and Hardwick. A clever and practical woman, she used the law to protect herself and her family and to build a huge inheritance for the dynasty she founded. She amassed a vast fortune and her descendants have held high positions in English society for 400 years.

Bess of Hardwick

Author: Mary Ellen Burville

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 110

View: 762


Elizabethan Treasures

Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire, England, houses a world-famous collection of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century textiles.

Author: Santina M Levey

Publisher: Harry N Abrams Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 112

View: 980

Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire, England, houses a world-famous collection of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century textiles. The fact that these exquisite pillow covers, wall hangings, bedcovers, carpets, and upholsteries, many decorated with superb embroidery, have survived in such good condition is little short of miraculous, and due in part to the formidable Countess of Shrewsbury, better known as Bess of Hardwick, who built the house in the 1590s. In her will, Bess instructed her heirs to 'have speciall care and regard to p'serve the same from all manner of wett, mothe and other hurte or spoyle thereof'.

The Building of Hardwick Hall

Hardwick Hall is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire, located in the parish of Ault-Hucknall, Derbyshire. It was built by Elizabeth Hardwick, commonly known as "Bess of Hardwick.".

Author: David N. Durant

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780946324033

Category: Great Britain

Page: 289

View: 359

Hardwick Hall is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire, located in the parish of Ault-Hucknall, Derbyshire. It was built by Elizabeth Hardwick, commonly known as "Bess of Hardwick.".

Hardwick Hall

Author: Charles H. Wood

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 905