Brand New Art From China

Many young Chinese artists have declared they are "not Chinese, but global" - this book investigates just what that means for China, the art market, and the world.

Author: Barbara Pollack

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1838608060

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 239

A unique and visionary generation of young Chinese artists are coming to prominence in the art world - just as China cements its place as the second largest art market on the planet. Building on the new frontiers opened up by the Chinese artists of the late 1980s and 1990s, artists such as Ai Wei Wei who came to the West and became household names, this new generation are provocative, exciting and bold. But what does it mean to be a Chinese artist today? And how can we better understand their work? Here, renowned critic Barbara Pollack presents the first book to tell the story of how these Chinese millennials, fast becoming global art superstars, negotiate their cultural heritage, and what this means for China's impact on the future of global culture. Many young Chinese artists have declared they are "not Chinese, but global" - this book investigates just what that means for China, the art market, and the world. Brand new Art from China is the first collection to showcase the dynamic new art coming from Chinese artists, and features full-colour photos and video stills throughout - with many works being published in book-form for the first time. Featuring an in-depth interview with Zhang Xiaogang, probably the most well-known artist in China itself, whose sombre portraits of Chinese families during the Cultural Revolution sell for as much as $12 million at auction, alongside unparalleled access to the tastemakers of today's art scene, Brand New Art from China is the essential guide to Chinese contemporary art today - its vision, values and aesthetics.

A Grand Materialism in the New Art from China

Hinged wooden boxes of cigarettes with the brand name in striking lettering on
the cover would include picture “trade ... the Virginia Museum of Fine Art by a
trustee whose father had been sent from China to Virginia to learn the tobacco
trade.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 1498596916

Category:

Page:

View: 794

"Material matters in new Chinese art, which presents its subjects through the directness and immediacy of its material. This book applies theories by Osborne and Danto to new Chinese art to show how artists are working below the level of language to make each work of art prove that it is art"--

Contemporary Chinese Art Aesthetic Modernity and Zhang Peili

(2018), Sun Xun, Sydney: Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. 93 Pollack,
Barbara (2018), Brand New Art from China: A Generation on the Rise, London: IB
Tauris. A press release accompanying this book states: 'Renowned critic Barbara
 ...

Author: Paul Gladston

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350041998

Category: Philosophy

Page: 248

View: 886

In recent decades the previously assumed dominance within the international art world of western(ized) conceptions of aesthetic modernity has been challenged by a critically becalming diversification of cultural outlooks widely referred to as 'contemporaneity'. Contributing to that diversification are assertions within mainland China of essential differences between Chinese and western art. In response to the critical impasse posed by contemporaneity, Paul Gladston charts a historical relay of mutually formative interactions between the artworlds of China and the West as part of a new transcultural theory of artistic criticality. Informed by deconstructivism as well as syncretic Confucianism, Gladston extends this theory to a reading of the work of the artist Zhang Peili and his involvement with the Hangzhou-based art group, the Pond Association (Chi she). Revealed is a critical aesthetic productively resistant to any single interpretative viewpoint, including those of Chinese exceptionalism and the supposed immanence of deconstructivist uncertainty. Addressing art in and from the People's Republic of China as a significant aspect of post-West contemporaneity, Gladston provides a new critical understanding of what it means to be 'contemporary' and the profound changes taking place in the art world today.

A Chinese Artist in the School of Paris

His paintings also provide us with valuable information on how Chinese artists practiced Western painting in the 1920s and 1930s. These are the reasons that Sanyu's work are considered fascinating and worthy of study today.

Author: Haoyu Ku

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Artists

Page: 236

View: 424

Abstract: Under political and cultural influence from the West, China underwent enormous changes from the turn of the last century. In 1911, the Chinese monarchy was overthrown and replaced by a republic. The Chinese elites at that time learnt new ideas and techniques from the West, including literature, drama, music, film and costume, which helped to create a brand new picture of China. In terms of painting, artists adopted new painting techniques to produce Western-style paintings. Some of them went to Japan to learn Western art, and some choose to go to France including Sanyu. In 1921, Sanyu arrived in Paris and studied at the Acaddmie de la Grande Chaumière to learn modem Western art. In the 1920s, Sanyu produced a number of linear drawings in this Academy. Sanyu's work stylistically echoes the sketches of Matisse and Picasso, particularly their use of simple continuous lines to portray the contour of the body. It might also be possible that Sanyu was influenced by Foujita, an artist who came from Japan and used Japanese fine brush to make sketches, as Sanyu also used Chinese brush to depict the contour lines. When his technique became mature, Sanyu also painted in oil and his oil paintings not only continued the styles of Matisse and Picasso, but were also influenced by artists from the School of Paris including Modigliani and Kisling. Therefore, from Sanyu's work one can understand how a Chinese art student practiced Western-style art in the Parisian art world of the early twentieth century. What is special about Sanyu is that he did not return to China after he finished studying in Paris, as did many other Chinese artists. From the year 1921 until he passed away in 1966, Sanyu spent most of his time in Paris creating modern paintings. Furthermore, many well-known artists from the School of Paris at that time were not native French, but from other places in the world. After their long periods of time being immersed in the art field of Paris, these artists are considered as important Parisian artists. Sanyu's painting style and lifestyle are quite similar to those of this group of artists. Sanyu, as a result, is not only a "Chinese artist," but also a "Parisian artist," or a member of the School of Paris. In the 1920s and 1930s, Sanyu was quite successful in Paris: His work was appreciated by a well-known patron Henri-Pierre Roche, and also exhibited at the Salon d'automne. However, it may be because of his irresponsibility or eccentricity that, in summation, Sanyu's career development in Paris was not satisfactory. Moreover in 1940, the styles of modern art were changing and Abstract Expressionism of the American avant-garde became the mainstream of the time. Sanyu's style remained constant and gradually lost its continuity with the major groundbreaking styles of the time. Nevertheless, when comparing Sanyu's work to other Chinese artists of the same generation, his work appears much more mature. In addition, works of many of these artists were destroyed or lost in the series of disasters in China and Sanyu's work was fortunately kept in good condition in Paris. We therefore can examine the whole spectrum of Sanyu's work. His paintings also provide us with valuable information on how Chinese artists practiced Western painting in the 1920s and 1930s. These are the reasons that Sanyu's work are considered fascinating and worthy of study today.

Urbanization and Contemporary Chinese Art

All of the fanfare about contemporary Chinese art has more or less turned it into a
new field for market speculation. For example, many new artist villages that
emerged after 2000 are no longer naturally formed artist colonies. They are either
 ...

Author: Meiqin Wang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317481704

Category: Art

Page: 264

View: 287

This book explores the relationship between the ongoing urbanization in China and the production of contemporary Chinese art since the beginning of the twenty-first century. Wang provides a detailed analysis of artworks and methodologies of art-making from eight contemporary artists who employ a wide range of mediums, including painting, sculpture, photography, installation, video, and performance. She also sheds light on the relationship between these artists and their sociocultural origins, investigating their provocative responses to various processes and problems brought about by Chinese urbanization. With this urbanization comes a fundamental shift of the philosophical and aesthetic foundations in the practice of Chinese art: from a strong affiliation with nature and countryside to one that is complexly associated with the city and the urban world.

The China Decorator

It is not the quantity, but the quality, that the 19th century art student demands.
This very valuable publication contains little of interest to the china decorator, but
is replete with everything of interest to the general reader. A BRAND new ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 257


Survey of China Mainland Press

The political content of literary and art works play a leading role in form , and form
in turn has a positive effect on content . Brand - new revolutionary content calls
for brand - new art for . If forn 18 stale and hackneyed and falls short of the deeds
 ...

Author: United States. Consulate General (Hong Kong, China)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 575


Chinese Literature

They stand out with their special features as a brand - new art on the
contemporary Chinese stage . The life of the masses is the inexhaustible source
of our art . The spare - time art workers from the ranks of workers , peasants and
soldiers are ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Chinese literature

Page:

View: 858


Selections from China Mainland Magazines

Comrade Chiang Ch'ing Leads Us To March Bravely Along Chairman Mao's
Revolutionary Line on Literature and Art by ... What pleases us particularly is that
recently a brand new variety has been added to our treasure house of proletarian
 ...

Author: United States. Consulate General (Hong Kong, China)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 646


Selections from People s Republic of China Magazines

From the Tibetan Plateau to the East China sea coasts , the strains of
revolutionary model theatrical works are echoing loudly throughout the expanse
of ... The result is a brand new proletarian art characteristic of the national style of
China .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 698


Frieze

Seen from the other side of the globe , the emotional housekeeping of the West
seems all the more in peril . Is this because the ... One headline in the Wall Street
Journal this July read : ' New art from China attracts Big Money from Collectors .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art, Modern

Page:

View: 154


China Today

On the one hand , it shows an internal tension between modernity and tradition ;
on the other , the refinement of painting paraphernalia has created a brand - new
art language . Instead of simply painting with a paintbrush , Qi also makes use ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 952


Twentieth century Chinese paintings in Singapore collections

During this period, the Chinese art circles, having been baptized by the impact of
the clash between Chinese and western ... for the first time, Chinese artists
traveled abroad in droves and were plunged into a whole new artistic experience
.

Author: Singapore Art Museum

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 212

View: 176


Art India

1996 . among the most coveted in the contemporary art market . employ
conventionally Western ' techniques to produce a distinctly Chinese brand of
modern art - seeking a visual language that was not only collectively
recognizable but also ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page:

View: 213


Chinese Music

Rhythmically , Chinese art song composers like to use different meters and
tempos for their songs . Rubato is a common and important ... apart from Western
art songs . They provide singers with a brand new repertoire to explore and
master .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page:

View: 892


Survey of People s Republic of China Press

These works vividly reveal brand - new features in the vigorous development of
the art of our traditional New Year pictures under the guiding light of Chairman
Mao's " Talks at the Yenan Forum on Literature and Art " after the great
proletarian ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 201


China Perspectives

Most of them sell decorative art . Others , like Hanart TZ , Plum Blossoms , Alisan
Fine Arts concentrate on the mainland and overseas Chinese . A few rare
exceptions like John Batten Gallery , Grotto Fine Art Gallery and brand new
galleries ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 159


China s Foreign Trade

Portraits glow with the brand - new spirit of our era . During the movement to
criticize Lin Piao and Confucius , a mass drive for innovations in Canton decor is
being carried on . Inspired by the new achievements on the literary and art front ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page:

View: 911


Dragon Rose Garden

Art and Power in China Sus van Elzen. Following extensive preparations , the
inaugural exhibition of the brand - new UCCA , or Ullens Center for
Contemporary Art , opened in the 798 art district in Dashanzi on the eastern
fringe of Beijing ...

Author: Sus van Elzen

Publisher: Timezone 8

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 197

View: 122

In this book, Sus Van Elzen investigates the transformation of China from 1949 to 2008, with a particular focus on artists and architects. The makeover of Beijing in particular has been driven not only by economic factors but also by the governing regime's cultural and political agenda. As Van Elzen demonstrates, the resultant conflict presents some unprecedented creative challenges.