British Cinema Past and Present

The contributors address: * British Cinema Studies and the concept of national cinema * the distribution and reception of British films in the US and Europe * key genres, movements and cycles of British cinema in the 1940s, 50s and 60s * ...

Author: Justine Ashby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135125155

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 408

View: 812

British Cinema: Past and Present responds to the commercial and critical success of British film in the 1990s. Providing a historical perspective to the contemporary resurgence of British cinema, this unique anthology brings together leading international scholars to investigate the rich diversity of British film production, from the early sound period of the 1930s to the present day. The contributors address: * British Cinema Studies and the concept of national cinema * the distribution and reception of British films in the US and Europe * key genres, movements and cycles of British cinema in the 1940s, 50s and 60s * questions of authorship and agency, with case studies of individual studios, stars, producers and directors * trends in British cinema, from propaganda films of the Second World War to the New Wave and the 'Swinging London' films of the Sixties * the representation of marginalised communities in films such as Trainspotting and The Full Monty * the evolution of social realism from Saturday Night, Sunday Morning to Nil By Mouth * changing approaches to Northern Ireland and the Troubles in films like The Long Good Friday and Alan Clarke's Elephant * contemporary 'art' and 'quality' cinema, from heritage drama to the work of Peter Greenaway, Derek Jarman, Terence Davies and Patrick Keiller.

British Cinema British cinema past and present

Author: Robert Murphy

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion picture industry

Page:

View: 637


British Cinema in the 1980 s

The book not only looks at the appeal of images of the past in the heritagefilm (such as Howard's End) and 'films of Empire' (such as A Passage to India) but also discusses the more questioning images of the present by the 'state of the ...

Author: John Hill

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 261

View: 967

In recent years, the role and identity of British Cinema has been changing, and it is these changes with which British cinema in the 1980s is concerned. It looks at the increasing domination of the world film industry by Hollywood and the response of British filmmaking to this, the role ofgovernment, and the increasingly close relationship between film and television. It also examines the kinds of images British Cinema produced in this period and how they relate to the shifting sense of 'British' identity. The book not only looks at the appeal of images of the past in the heritagefilm (such as Howard's End) and 'films of Empire' (such as A Passage to India) but also discusses the more questioning images of the present by the 'state of the nation' film such as Letter to Brezhnev and My Beautiful Laundrette. In doing so, it explores how these films deal with issues of class,gender and ethnicity and how these in turn to connect to our understanding of the 'Britishness' of British cinema. British Cinema in the 1980s will become the definitive study of an important period of British filmmaking. Bringing together a discussion of British society, the British film industry and British films, John Hill provides an accessible analysis of the main themes and issues characterizing Britishcinema of the time.

European Cinema and Television

This book offers comparative studies of the production, content, distribution and reception of film and television drama in Europe.

Author: Ib Bondebjerg

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113735688X

Category: Political Science

Page: 265

View: 713

This book offers comparative studies of the production, content, distribution and reception of film and television drama in Europe. The collection brings together scholars from the humanities and social sciences to focus on how new developments are shaped by national and European policies and practices, and on the role of film and television in our everyday lives. The chapters explore key trends in transnational European film and television fiction, addressing issues of co-production and collaboration, and of how cultural products circulate across national borders. The chapters investigate how watching film and television from neighbouring countries can be regarded as a special kind of cultural encounter with the possibility of facilitating reflections on national differences within Europe and negotiations of what characterizes a national or a European identity respectively.

Sixties British Cinema

Their search for realism has often been dismissed as drabness and their more frivolous efforts can now appear just empty-headed. Robert Murphy's Sixties British Cinema is the first study to challenge this view.

Author: Robert Murphy

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1838718257

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 360

View: 362

British films of the 1960s are undervalued. Their search for realism has often been dismissed as drabness and their more frivolous efforts can now appear just empty-headed. Robert Murphy's Sixties British Cinema is the first study to challenge this view. He shows that the realist tradition of the late 50s and early 60s was anything but dreary and depressing, and gave birth to a clutch of films remarkable for their confidence and vitality: Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Kind of Loving, and A Taste of Honey are only the better known titles. Sixties British Cinema revalues key genres of the period - horror, crime and comedy - and takes a fresh look at the 'swinging London' films, finding disturbing undertones that reflect the cultural changes of the decade. Now that our cinematic past is constantly recycled on television, Murphy's informative, engaging and perceptive review of these films and their cultural and industrial context offers an invaluable guide to this neglected era of British cinema.

The British Cinema Book

The new edition of The British Cinema Book has been thoroughly revised and updated to provide a comprehensive introduction to the major periods, genres, studios, film-makers and debates in British cinema from the 1890s to the present.

Author: Robert Murphy

Publisher: British Film Inst

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 452

View: 628

The new edition of The British Cinema Book has been thoroughly revised and updated to provide a comprehensive introduction to the major periods, genres, studios, film-makers and debates in British cinema from the 1890s to the present. The book has five sections, addressing debates and controversies; industry, genre and representation; British cinema 1895-1939; British cinema from World War II to the 1970s, and contemporary British cinema. Within these sections, leading scholars and critics address a wide range of issues and topics, including British cinema as a 'national' cinema; its complex relationship with Hollywood; film censorship; key British genres such as horror, comedy and costume film; the work of directors including Alfred Hitchcock, Anthony Asquith, Alexander Mackendrick, Michael Powell, Lindsay Anderson, Ken Russell and Mike Leigh; studios such as Gainsborough, Ealing, Rank and Gaumont, and recent signs of hope for the British film industry, such as the rebirth of the low-budget British horror picture, and the emergence of a British Asian cinema. Discussions are illustrated with case studies of key films, many of which are new to this edition, including Piccadilly (1929) It Always Rains on Sunday (1947), The Ladykillers (1955), This Sporting Life (1963), The Devils (1971), Withnail and I (1986), Bend it Like Beckham (2002) and Control (2007), and with over 100 images from the BFI's collection. The Editor: Robert Murphy is Professor in Film Studies at De Montfort University and has written and edited a number of books on British cinema, including British Cinema and the Second World War (2000) and Directors in British and Irish Cinema (2006). The contributors: Ian Aitken, Charles Barr, Geoff Brown, William Brown, Stella Bruzzi, Jon Burrows, James Chapman, Steve Chibnall, Pamela Church Gibson, Ian Conrich, Richard Dacre, Raymond Durgnat, Allen Eyles, Christine Geraghty, Christine Gledhill, Kevin Gough-Yates, Sheldon Hall, Benjamin Halligan, Sue Harper, Erik Hedling, Andrew Hill, John Hill, Peter Hutchings, Nick James, Marcia Landy, Barbara Korte, Alan Lovell, Brian McFarlane, Martin McLoone, Andrew Moor, Robert Murphy, Lawrence Napper, Michael O'Pray, Jim Pines, Vincent Porter, Tim Pulleine, Jeffrey Richards, James C. Robertson, Tom Ryall, Justin Smith, Andrew Spicer, Claudia Sternberg, Sarah Street, Melanie Williams and Linda Wood.

The Encyclopedia of British Film

He has published widely in Britain , Australia and the US , his recent books
including Novel to Film : An Introduction to the ... She is co - editor of British
Cinema , Past and Present and is currently writing a book about Muriel and Betty
Box .

Author: Brian McFarlane

Publisher: Methuen Pub Limited

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 811

View: 144

Produced with assistance from the British Film Institute, this is a comprehensive history of the British film industry from its inception to the present day, with minute listings of the producers, directors, actors and studios behind a century of great British cinema.

Major Film Directors of the American and British Cinema

Ken Russell The Past as Present If Stanley Kubrick has enabled us to understand
the present better by looking into the future , Ken Russell has given us some
insights into the present by taking us into the past . “ Historical films are often
made ...

Author: Gene D. Phillips

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 290

View: 396

This book focuses on fourteen American and British directors who warrant more attention than they have received in other cinema histories. This revised, updated, and expanded edition offers a new introductory chapter as well as an updated bibliography, filmography, and epilogue.

Young and Innocent

This book brings together the study of silent cinema and the study of British cinema, both of which have seen some of the most exciting developments in Film Studies in recent years.

Author: Andrew Higson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 420

View: 774

This book brings together the study of silent cinema and the study of British cinema, both of which have seen some of the most exciting developments in Film Studies in recent years. The result is a comprehensive survey of one of the most important periods of film history. Most of the acknowledged experts on this period are represented, joined by several new voices. Together they chart the development of cinema in Britain from its beginnings in the 1890s to the conversion to sound in the late 1920s. From these accounts the youthful British cinema emerges as far from innocent. On the contrary, it was a fascinatingly complex field of cultural and industrial practices. The book also includes guides to bibliographical and archival sources and an extensive bibliography.

British Cinema Now

Stars of past and present also interweave curiously in another film of an album ,
Quadrophenia , Franc Roddam ' s fine visualisation of The Who ' s second and
less famous concept album ' . Set in the Mod era of 1964 , its release coincided ...

Author: Martyn Auty

Publisher: British Film Institute

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 168

View: 617

No Marketing Blurb

British Historical Cinema

From Elizabeth to Carry On Up The Khyber, and from the heritage-film debate to issues of authenticity and questions of genre, British Historical Cinema explores the ways in which British films have represented the past on screen, the issues ...

Author: Claire Monk

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136366490

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 871

Films recreating or addressing 'the past' - recent or distant, actual or imagined - have been a mainstay of British cinema since the silent era. From Elizabeth to Carry On Up The Khyber, and from the heritage-film debate to issues of authenticity and questions of genre, British Historical Cinema explores the ways in which British films have represented the past on screen, the issues they raise and the debates they have provoked. Discussing films from biopics to literary adaptations, and from depictions of Britain's colonial past to the re-imagining of recent decades in retro films such as Velvet Goldmine, a range of contributors ask whose history is being represented, from whose perspective, and why.

British Cinema

Amy Sargeant's personal and entertaining history of British cinema aims to fill this gap.

Author: Amy Sargeant

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1838714758

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 375

Although new writing and research on British cinema has burgeoned over the last fifteen years, there has been a continued lack of single-authored books providing a coherent overview to this fascinating and elusive national cinema. Amy Sargeant's personal and entertaining history of British cinema aims to fill this gap. With its insightful decade-by-decade analysis, British Cinema is brought alive for a new generation of British cinema students and the general reader alike. Sargeant challenges Rachel Low's premise 'that few of the films made in England during the twenties were any good' by covering subjects as diverse as the art of intertitling, the narrative complexities of Shooting Stars and Brunel's burlesques. Sargeant goes onto examine among other things, the differing acting styles of Dietrich and Donat in the seminal Knight Without Armour to early promotional campaigns in the 1930s, whereas subjects ranging from product endorsement by stars to the character of the suburban wife are covered in the 1940s. The 1950s includes topics such as the effect of post-war government intervention, to Free Cinema and Lindsay Anderson's 'infuriating lapses of rigour', together with a much-needed overview of Michael Balcon's contribution to British cinema. For Sargeant, the 1960s provides an overview of the tentative relationship between film and advertising and the rise of young Turks such as Tony Richardson, Ken Loach, Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg.

Film History and National Cinema

The Wales Screen Commission offers a ' Movie Map ' similar to the British Tourist
Authority ' s ' Movie Map ' produced in 1998 . In Scotland , Fort William and
Lochaber organizations have run a ' Now You ' ve Seen the Film ' promotion .

Author: Kevin Rockett

Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 634

This is the second volume of papers from the Irish Postgraduate Film Research Seminar designed to encourage Irish film scholarship and the study of Irish film. Intended to provide a platform for a growing body of work by young scholars on Irish and other cinemas, this volume provides a stimulating discussion on national and international film.

Shocking Representation

How the modern horror film has represented the social conflicts left in the wake of national trauma.

Author: Adam Lowenstein

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231132476

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 255

View: 879

How the modern horror film has represented the social conflicts left in the wake of national trauma.

The Routledge Companion to British Cinema History

Over 39 chapters The Routledge Companion to British Cinema History offers a comprehensive and revisionist overview of British cinema as, on the one hand, a commercial entertainment industry and, on the other, a series of institutions ...

Author: Ian Hunter

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315392178

Category: PERFORMING ARTS

Page: 472

View: 334

Over 39 chapters The Routledge Companion to British Cinema History offers a comprehensive and revisionist overview of British cinema as, on the one hand, a commercial entertainment industry and, on the other, a series of institutions centred on economics, funding and relations to government. Whereas most histories of British cinema focus on directors, stars, genres and themes, this Companion explores the forces enabling and constraining the films’ production, distribution, exhibition, and reception contexts from the late nineteenth century to the present day. The contributors provide a wealth of empirical and archive-based scholarship that draws on insider perspectives of key film institutions and illuminates aspects of British film culture that have been neglected or marginalized, such as the watch committee system, the Eady Levy, the rise of the multiplex and film festivals. It also places emphasis on areas where scholarship has either been especially productive and influential, such as in early and silent cinema, or promoted new approaches, such as audience and memory studies.

Teaching Contemporary British Cinema

... 2002 , One Hundred Films and a Funeral , Thorogood M Landy , 2000 , ' The
Other Side of Paradise : British Cinema from an American Perspective ' in J
Ashby and A Higson , ( eds ) , British Cinema : Past and Present , Routledge M
Lawson ...

Author: Sarah Casey Benyahia

Publisher: Teaching Film and Media Studie

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 92

View: 541

A clear and easy to use guide for introducing this fascinating topic into the classroom.

Film Propaganda in Britain and Nazi Germany

World War II Cinema Jo Fox. Exeter Press , Exeter , 2002 ) ; Dissolving Views :
Key Writings on British Cinema ( Cassell , London , 1996 ) ; J . Ashby and A .
Higson ( eds ) , British Cinema , Past and Present ( Routledge , London / New
York ...

Author: Jo Fox

Publisher: Berg Publishers

ISBN: 9781859738962

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 409

Propaganda - so crucial to winning the battle of hearts and minds in warfare - witnessed a transformation during World War II, when film was fast becoming the most popular form of entertainment. In Film Propaganda in Britain and Nazi Germany, Jo Fox compares how each country exploited their national cinema for political purposes. Through an investigation of shorts and feature films, the author looks at how both political propaganda films and escapist cinema were critical in maintaining the morale of civilians and the military, and how this changed throughout the war. While both countries shared certain similarities in their wartime propaganda films - a harking back to a glorious historic past, for example - the thematic differences reveal important distinctions between cultures. This book offers new insight into the shifting pattern of morale during World War II and highlights a key moment in propaganda film history.

The Media in Scotland

( 1982 ) , Scotch Reels : Scotland in Cinema and Television , London : British
Film Institute . ... Powrie , P . ( 2000 ) , ' On the threshold between past and
present : “ Alternative heritage ” , in J . Ashby and A . Higson ( eds ) , British
Cinema , Past ...

Author: Neil Blain

Publisher: Film, Media, and Cultural Stud

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 914

A comprehensive study of the media in Scotland.

BFI Film and Television Handbook

British Film Institute , 128p . maps . graphs . tables . glossary . index . ISBN
0851708609 report of the Skillset DCMS ... SKILLSET , 207p . tables . graphs .
appendices . Close - up : Iranian cinema : past , present and future DABASHI ,
Hamid .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion picture industry

Page:

View: 565


Film Europe and Film America

This book is a volume in the series Exeter Studies in Film History, and represents a major contribution to cinema scholarship as well as reflecting a strong interest in an area of study currently being developed in university departments ...

Author: Andrew Higson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 406

View: 750

Winner of the 2000 Prix Jean Mitry. A volume of specially-commissioned essays dealing with the attempts to create a pan-European film production movement in the 1920s and 1930s, and the reactions of the American film industry to these plans to rival its hegemony. The book has an impressive array of top scholars from both America and Europe, including Thomas Elsaesser, Kristin Thompson and Ginette Vincendeau, as well as essays by some younger scholars who have recently completed new archival research. It also includes a number of primary documents selected by the contributors to illuminate their arguments and provide a stimulus to further research. This book is a volume in the series Exeter Studies in Film History, and represents a major contribution to cinema scholarship as well as reflecting a strong interest in an area of study currently being developed in university departments and at the British Film Institute. Winner Prix Jean Mitry 2000