British Railways in the 1960s

These started to come on stream from 1951.This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely ...

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1473869765

Category: Transportation

Page: 168

View: 164

After the Second War, Britains railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The Big Four railway companies were nationalised from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951.This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968.This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER.The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down.The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around.Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

British Railways in the 1960s

This series of books, The Geoff Plumb Collection, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years.

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 147386979X

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 522

After the Second War, Britain's railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernization. The Big Four railway companies were nationalized from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a program of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This program was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselize and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, The Geoff Plumb Collection, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

Report of a Traffic Survey Carried Out on the Southern Region of British Railways on Saturday 6 August 1960

Author: Railway Correspondence and Travel Society

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 24

View: 119


Working time table of passenger trains main lines 13 June 1960

Author: British Railways. Southern Region

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 282


Southern Region Through the 1960s

A year-by-year journey through Southern Region in the 1960s.

Author: Michael Hymans

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 144566643X

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 912

A year-by-year journey through Southern Region in the 1960s.

Southern Region Electro Diesel Locomotives and Units

This volume shows all the classes at work, in a variety of colour schemes and locations, and has been compiled by David Cable, well known author of a range of books regarding Modern Traction, published by Pen and Sword Books Ltd.

Author: David Cable

Publisher: Modern Traction Profiles

ISBN: 9781526720610

Category:

Page: 256

View: 492

The electro-diesel locomotives and multiple units used by the Southern Region of British Railways, were unique to this region. The locomotives of class 73 were used extensively throughout the region, in particular on Gatwick Express services, as well as on departmental and track recording trains. Their versatility in being able to work off 3rd rail electricity as well as diesel engined power gave them unrivalled areas of work. The class 74s, which only had a short life, were seen particularly on boat trains and parcels services on the South Western main line. The classes 201-3 were 6-car units of narrow bodied construction, so as to be able to work Hastings line services with its restricted clearances. The other classes 204-207 were 3-car units employed on stopping services throughout the region, but especially in Hampshire and the lines to Uckfield and originally East Grinstead. They were also seen on services in East Sussex and Kent. This volume shows all the classes at work, in a variety of colour schemes and locations, and has been compiled by David Cable, well known author of a range of books regarding Modern Traction, published by Pen and Sword Books Ltd. AUTHOR: David Cable was born in 1929 and lives in Hartley Wintney, Hampshire. He has had an interest in trains since the age of three, which developed into an interest in train photography in 1947. David is the author of many photo albums, covering modern traction in the UK since the 1960s, as well as volumes based on his visits to the other countries over the last forty years. He has visited countries throughout Europe, North America and Australia, as well as some Far Eastern countries and Morocco.

British Railways in the 1960s Western Region

This series of books, ‘The Geoff Plumb Collection’, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years.

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 147386982X

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 630

After the Second World War, Britain’s railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The ‘Big Four’ railway companies were nationalised from 1948 and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new ‘Standard’ steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the ‘Standard’ types was built in 1960 – and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, ‘The Geoff Plumb Collection’, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former ‘Big Four’, in the form of the BR Regions they became: the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion – often a ‘last run’ of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years – mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

Report of a Traffic Survey Carried Out on the Southern Region of British Railways on Saturday 6th August 1960

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Southern region

Page: 27

View: 290


British Steam BR Standard Locomotives

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948.

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1783408014

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 202

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.

Suburban Passenger Services 13 June to 11 September 1960

Author: British Railways. Southern Region

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 996

View: 431


British Railways in the 1960s Western Region

BBC British Broadcasting Corporation BR (S) British Railways (Southern Region)
BR British Railways DMU Diesel Multiple Unit DN&S Didcot, Newbury &
Southampton Railway ECML East Coast Main Line ECS Empty Coaching Stock
ERTMS ...

Author: Geoff Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 1473869838

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 676

After the Second World War, Britain’s railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The ‘Big Four’ railway companies were nationalised from 1948 and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new ‘Standard’ steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the ‘Standard’ types was built in 1960 – and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, ‘The Geoff Plumb Collection’, is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former ‘Big Four’, in the form of the BR Regions they became: the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion – often a ‘last run’ of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years – mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

British Railways Steam in the 1960s

"In this book, the follow-up to his highly successful British Railways Steam in the 1950s, Eric Sawford traces the last days of steam on British Railways, showing a wide variety of engines and locations.

Author: E. H. Sawford

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 166

View: 794

"In this book, the follow-up to his highly successful British Railways Steam in the 1950s, Eric Sawford traces the last days of steam on British Railways, showing a wide variety of engines and locations. A superb collection of over 250 photographs, complemented by informed commentary and captions, this is a book that the steam enthusiast will not want to miss."--BOOK JACKET.

A Bibliography of British Railway History

Author:

Publisher: Stationery Office/Tso

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 544

View: 575


Railway Accident

Author: Great Britain. Ministry of Transport

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 146


British Railways in Transition

This is a book about the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction on British Railways, covering a period from 1960–1970.

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1526703181

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 116

This is a book about the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction on British Railways, covering a period from 1960–1970. The author Jim Blake, took a huge number of pictures during this period, covering all aspects of the railway and its operations, both in the London area, where he lived and also around the country. This book looks at the railway scene in decline, trying to come to terms with the post Beeching, post steam era, before a change of political will, that has seen much rail investment in recent times. The volume, not only looks at locomotives and trains, but also the overall railway scene of that decade of great change the 1960s.

Suburban passenger services 12 September 1960 to 11 June 1961

Author: British Railways. Southern Region

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 892

View: 719


Passenger services timetable main line and surburban 13 June to 11 September 1960

Author: British Railways. Southern Region

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 587


Ottley s Bibliography of British Railway History Second Supplement 12957 19605

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Railroads

Page: 647

View: 664


The Urie and Maunsell Cylinder 4 6 0s

This book is one in the Pen & Sword Transport History imprint in the _Locomotive Portfolio_ series and covers the family of two-cylinder 4-6-0s designed and built by the Chief Mechanical Engineers of the London & South Western and ...

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473852536

Category: Transportation

Page: 264

View: 800

This book is one in the Pen & Sword Transport History imprint in the ‘Locomotive Portfolio’ series and covers the family of two-cylinder 4-6-0s designed and built by the Chief Mechanical Engineers of the London & South Western and Southern Railways between 1914 and 1936, which survived well into the era of British Railways. The N15 ‘King Arthur’ class of express passenger engines were the mainstay of the Southern Railway’s passenger business between the two world wars, but both Robert Urie and Richard Maunsell built mixed traffic and freight locomotives of a similar ilk forming a ‘King Arthur’ family of locomotives for all purposes that were simple, robust and long lived. This book describes the conception, design and construction of the N15, H15 and S15 classes and the N15X rebuilds of the LB&SCR ‘Baltic Tanks’ and their operation in traffic before and after the Second World War, until the withdrawal of the last Maunsell 4-6-0 in 1965. The book includes extensive personal recollections of the author, who both saw and travelled on hundreds of trains hauled by many of these engines in the 1950s and ‘60s, and gives a brief summary of those that have been preserved on Britain’s heritage railways. The book is copiously illustrated with over 200 black and white and colour illustrations.

Railway Accidents Double Collision which Occurred on 28th January 1960 at Borough Market Junction in the Southern Region British Railways

Author: Great Britain. Ministry of Transport

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 6

View: 772