Community Writing

First-year college composition textbook features a series of recursive assignments that allow students to research & write about issues confronting their individual communities. Covers the basics of the course (the writing process).

Author: Paul S. Collins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135648433

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 291

Community Writing: Researching Social Issues Through Composition employs a series of assignments that guide students to research and write about issues confronting their individual communities. Students start by identifying a community to which they belong and focusing on problems in it, and then analyze possible solutions, construct arguments for them, decide which are likely to succeed, and consider how to initiate action. This is a primary text for first-year composition courses, covering the basics of the writing process. The assignments are recursive. Short writing assignments in each chapter build up to longer papers. Each of the assignment questions is accompanied by a guide to thinking about and writing the assigned paper, followed by a short Focus On reading that provides a brief account of community activism, a media case study, or a notable success story. The longer papers are accompanied by in-class peer reading groups. Each successive peer reading attempts a higher level of conceptual critique. By working together throughout the semester, students create increasingly adept peer groups familiar with all stages of each other's research. The book is carefully structured, but there is plenty of "give" in it, allowing instructors to be flexible in adapting it to the needs of their students and courses. Community Writing: * is distinguished by pedagogy based on a collaborative, process-oriented, service learning approach that emphasizes media critique and field research on community issues chosen by individual students; * answers real student questions, such as: Where do I find articles on my topic? What if evidence contradicts my hypothesis? How do I know if a source is biased?; * is web-savvy--guides students into building their own Web sites, including a unique guide for critiquing the design and veracity of other people's websites; and * is media-savvy--topics include media monopolies, spin control, dumbing down, misleading statistics, the Freedom of Information Act, "crackpot" authors, political rhetoric, and fallacious argumentation.

1918

Author: Pauline Rowe

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780993346682

Category:

Page: 59

View: 428


A Community of Writers A Workshop Course in Writing

The third edition features a new design and incorporates expanded treatment of argumentation and research, in-depth coverage of the Internet (including a mini-workshop on composing a web page) and computer-based writing, coverage of visual ...

Author: Peter Elbow

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 576

View: 539

This groundbreaking rhetoric/reader is known for its practical, workshop approach. Addressing students as writers, A COMMUNITY OF WRITERS features numerous writing activities and assignments that challenge students to develop their skills by writing often, by exploring their writing processes, and by sharing their writing with others. The third edition features a new design and incorporates expanded treatment of argumentation and research, in-depth coverage of the Internet (including a mini-workshop on composing a web page) and computer-based writing, coverage of visual literacy, more material on drafting, and a variety of new student and professional essays.

Engaging Communities

"This book exists, is here for you as a resource because we, the authors/editors of this text (Suzanne Blum Malley and Ames Hawkins), saw very similar, very exciting things happening in our classrooms using ethnographic research methods in ...

Author: Suzanne Blum Malley

Publisher:

ISBN: 1300154365

Category: Authorship

Page: 67

View: 177

"This book exists, is here for you as a resource because we, the authors/editors of this text (Suzanne Blum Malley and Ames Hawkins), saw very similar, very exciting things happening in our classrooms using ethnographic research methods in our inquiry-based first-year writing classrooms. We have watched our students develop strong voices as writers, while also using critical analytical skills and addressing important ideas of ethics, identity, and representation. In our classrooms, we have seen a greater level of investment in ethnographic projects than we have seen in more traditional rhetorically based assignments. Ethnographic writing, by creating a very authentic role for the researcher and a connection to community, offers a means to address the alienation and/or boredom that many non-traditional writers and first-year college students feel when confronted with the traditional composition curriculum—any curriculum, actually. More importantly, ethnographic research allows students to access what can seem so terribly difficult when framed in other assignments: to pursue a line of inquiry rather than a topic, to research ethically, and to write with authority. Though we initially wrote this text with the first-year writing classroom in mind, we have come to understand that there are many courses that also present students with ethnographic writing assignments. These courses may or may not be designed to spend much time on the question of how to get started with these projects. In addition, instructors might want to supplement the basic methodological approach with their own course content. We are also aware that textbook size and cost has exploded in recent years. We believe in preserving the internet as an open-source space and wish to reinforce our belief with practice. As a result of these realizations, we have reorganized the project in order to 1) Make it relevant and accessible to students in nearly any college classroom who might be assigned an ethnographic writing project; 2) Allow instructors to supplement the core methodology (presented here in Chapters 1–6), as they see fit, using any number of Supplemental Modules that offer additional materials, lenses, and multi-modal examples of and for issues and ideas discussed in the core text. 3) Make it accessible and available, via the internet and other technological platforms, to students and instructors everywhere. A disclaimer: we want to make clear that while we use and invoke methodological principles and practices associated with ethnography, we are not claiming Engaging Communities as a text that teaches ethnography as a research methodology. This book has been designed to help students (most likely undergraduates, perhaps high school, possibly graduates ) envision interesting, hands-on research projects that are eventually converted—translated—into written text. Throughout the text, we often use the word ethnographic in order to describe our methodological presentation and theoretical concerns as this term reflects the pedagogical (teaching) and rhetorical (arguing) concerns of ethnography, rather than the actual disciplinary understanding of the methodology. We choose to use to teach this way because ethnographic writing allows for specific discussion regarding how to involve and interest a reader, in evoking physical and emotional connection with writing, rather than simply becoming informed or persuaded by any specific piece of writing"--Back cover.

Building a Writing Community

Explains how to create the philosophical and physical environment needed to develop successful writing communities in which students learn, practice, and apply writing-craft skills.

Author: Marcia Sheehan Freeman

Publisher: Maupin House Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 0929895134

Category: Education

Page: 276

View: 946

Explains how to create the philosophical and physical environment needed to develop successful writing communities in which students learn, practice, and apply writing-craft skills.

Unsustainable

This book affirms that unpredictability is an indispensable factor in the field, and argues that such unpredictability presents-in fact, demands-a theoretical approach that takes these practical experiences as its base.

Author: Jessica Restaino

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0739172565

Category: Education

Page: 275

View: 720

Unsustainable: Re-imagining Community Literacy, Public Writing, Service-Learning, and the University, edited by Jessica Restaino and Laurie Cella, explores short-lived university/community writing projects in an effort to rethink the long-held gold standard of long-term sustainability in community writing work. Contributors examine their own efforts in order to provide alternate models for understanding, assessing, and enacting university/community writing projects that, for a range of reasons, fall outside of traditional practice. This collection considers what has become an increasingly unified call for praxis, where scholar-practitioners explore a specific project that fell short of theorized best practice sustainability in order to determine not only the nature of what remains how and why we might find value in a community-based writing project that lacks long-term sustainability, for example but also how or why we might rethink, redefine, and reevaluate best practice ideals in the first place. In so doing, the contributors are at once responding to what has been an increasing acknowledgment in the field that, for a variety of reasons, many community-based writing projects do not go as initially planned, and also applying in praxis a framework for thinking about and studying such projects. Unsustainable represents the kind of scholarly work that some of the most recognizable names in the field have been calling for over the past five years. This book affirms that unpredictability is an indispensable factor in the field, and argues that such unpredictability presents in fact, demands a theoretical approach that takes these practical experiences as its base."

Rhetoric of Respect

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric series published by the Conference on College Composition and Communication of the National Council of Teachers of English.

Author: Tiffany Rousculp

Publisher: Conference

ISBN: 9780814141472

Category: English language

Page: 185

View: 705

Studies in Writing and Rhetoric series published by the Conference on College Composition and Communication of the National Council of Teachers of English.

Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning

By contrast , she had a limited set of strategies for organizing and presenting
material , and its limits were more severely strained by the community writing (
which , after all , she was doing for the first time ) than by school writing tasks .
Pamela ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Community and college

Page:

View: 770


A Community of Writers

Zemelman and Daniels offer detailed guidance for all aspects of teaching and using writing.

Author: Steven Zemelman

Publisher: Boynton/Cook

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 286

View: 434

Zemelman and Daniels offer detailed guidance for all aspects of teaching and using writing.

WPA Writing Program Administration

In such a context , sociologists like Anthony Cohen argue that community is
constructed symbolically as a system of values , norms ... Writing program
interactions with communities , therefore , need to be framed as research activity
for reasons ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English language

Page:

View: 197


A Community of Writers

Author: Peter Elbow

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 486

View: 734


Writing the Community

This volume is part of a series of 18 monographs on service learning and the academic disciplines.

Author: Linda Adler-Kassner

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.

ISBN: 1563770067

Category: Education

Page: 203

View: 237

This volume is part of a series of 18 monographs on service learning and the academic disciplines. These essays highlight some of the benefits and problems of service-learning in the college composition curriculum and present further areas for study. Following the Introduction, "Service-Learning and Composition at the Crossroads," by Linda Adler-Kassner, Robert Crooks, and Ann Watters, and an Introduction, "Service-Learning: Help for Higher Education in a New Millennium?" by Lillian Bridwell-Bowles, the essays are: "Writing across the Curriculum and Community Service Learning: Correspondences, Cautions, and Futures" (Tom Deans); "Community Service Writing: Problems, Challenges, Questions" (Nora Bacon); "Community Service and Critical Teaching" (Bruce Herzberg); "Rhetoric Made Real: Civic Discourse and Writing beyond the Curriculum" (Paul Heilker); "Democratic Conversations: Civic Literacy and Service-Learning in the American Grains" (David D. Cooper and Laura Julier); "Partners in Inquiry: A Logic for Community Outreach" (Linda Flower); "Service-Learning: Bridging the Gap between the Real World and the Composition Classroom" (Wade Dorman and Susann Fox Dorman); "Systems Thinking, Symbiosis, and Service: The Road to Authority for Basic Writers" (Rosemary L. Arca); "Combining the Classroom and the Community: Service-Learning in Composition at Arizona State University" (Gay W. Brack and Leanna R. Hall); "The Write for Your Life Project: Learning To Serve by Serving To Learn" (Patricia Lambert Stock and Janet Swenson); and "On Reflection: The Role of Logs and Journals in Service-Learning Courses" (Chris M. Anson). Appended are a 39-item annotated bibliography and a list of program descriptions by institution. (All papers contain references.) (SM)

Outgrowing

By telling the stories of those directly involved, Writing Wrongs offers a different and often-ignored perspective that challenges stereotypes and prejudices. In this edition, members of the LGBTQ+ community share their stories.

Author: Writing Wrongs Staff

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780986211058

Category: Social Science

Page: 70

View: 936

Writing Wrongs is a literary journalism program that illuminates the inequity in our society through the power of the pen and the lens. By telling the stories of those directly involved, Writing Wrongs offers a different and often-ignored perspective that challenges stereotypes and prejudices. In this edition, members of the LGBTQ+ community share their stories. College students who are accepted into the annual program spend Labor Day weekend at a specific location and immerse themselves in a specific social issue. They interview local community members, take pictures and videos, update our social media, and ultimately design a print file for publication. The goal of raising awareness is accomplished by donating the student-created book to local and regional public and college libraries and relevant organizations.

Creative Writing

The book offers both a detailed ethnographic study and a careful historical account of creative writing in cultural policy and educational provision, and provides a contextual framework that highlights the contribution of adult education to ...

Author: Rebecca O'Rourke

Publisher: National Inst of Adult Continuing

ISBN: 9781862011618

Category: Education

Page: 263

View: 499

Creative Writing: Education, Culture and Community offers the first conceptual account of creative writing, one of the most popular â?? and controversial â?? educational subjects. Oâ??Rourke, a long-established member of the creative writing community, provides a comprehensive and accessible guide to the issues and tensions associated with creative writing and puts them in the context of current policy debates. These debates include how best to manage, teach and learn creative writing; how to value and evaluate these activities; and the interface between arts activity and educational inclusiveness. This compelling and lucid text argues that the current dominance of educational values and processes in cultural policy is problematic for advocates of cultural action as a catalyst for radical social change. The book offers both a detailed ethnographic study and a careful historical account of creative writing in cultural policy and educational provision, and provides a contextual framework that highlights the contribution of adult education to cultural change and community development.

Women s Life writing

These essays offer readers vivid and varied evidence of the female response to recurring attempts by culture to artificially limit identity along the gendered lines of private and public experience.

Author: Linda S. Coleman

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN: 9780879727482

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 281

View: 870

These essays offer readers vivid and varied evidence of the female response to recurring attempts by culture to artificially limit identity along the gendered lines of private and public experience. Calling on voices both familiar and little known, British and American, black and white, young and old, the essayists explore how women used life-writing as a means of both self-understanding and connection to a community of sympathetic others, real or imagined.

A Community Writing Itself Conversations with Vanguard Writers of the Bay Area Dalkey Archive Scholarly Series

Author: Sarah Rosenthal

Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press

ISBN: 156478620X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 664

Interviews about art and life with contemporary experimental American writers. A Community Writing Itself features internationally respected writers Michael Palmer, Nathaniel Mackey, Leslie Scalapino, Brenda Hillman, Kathleen Fraser, Stephen Ratcliffe, Robert Glu?ck, and Barbara Guest, and important younger writers Truong Tran, Camille Roy, Juliana Spahr, and Elizabeth Robinson. The book fills a major gap in contemporary poetics, focusing on one of the most vibrant experimental writing communities in the nation. The writers discuss vision and craft, war and peace, race and gender, individuality and collectivity, and the impact of the Bay Area on their work.

A Community Writing Itself

Interviews about art and life with contemporary experimental American writers.

Author: Sarah Rosenthal

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 156478620X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 310

Interviews about art and life with contemporary experimental American writers.

Making Space Community Writing and Performance Toward the Production of Location

This dissertation considers how the performance of locally-situated writing can contribute to existing community development efforts in towns and cities and how performance-oriented projects in composition courses can build community that, ...

Author: Sarah Moon

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic dissertations

Page:

View: 676

This dissertation considers how the performance of locally-situated writing can contribute to existing community development efforts in towns and cities and how performance-oriented projects in composition courses can build community that, in turn, supports deeper learning and preparation for citizenship. In the community context, this project considers how we make space in place against the forces of colonization that have largely foreclosed the opportunity for what I call ground-motion, the activity of people and groups of people in the places where they live. The ultimate goal of this space-making is the production of locality, a sense of place that is constructed and maintained by the people who live there. I narrate the undertaking of a community writing and performance project that I facilitated in Willimantic, CT, Write Your Roots, that worked toward this goal. My research based on interviews with the project participants and audience members led to the development of the framework concept "spheres of impact," which I use to organize my discussion of the results of Write Your Roots. I conclude that the most significant impacts were made at the level of the participant group, but also consider how such impacts can ripple out to the community at large. By contextualizing a first-year writing assignment adapted from Write Your Roots within the long history of oral delivery in college English, I show that there are both social and pedagogical exigencies for bringing oral delivery back into our classrooms today. The social goal for this reorientation of our courses, based on inspiration from elocutionist Thomas Sheridan and late eighteenth-century American English curriculum, is to provide training that will empower more voices to speak in public contexts. The pedagogical goal is to deepen the revision process by mining the inventive potential of rehearsal and the stakes of performance. My project sheds light on the ways that writing in performance connects to place not only as a means of revealing its existing complexity but as a means of collectively reimagining its future toward democratic revitalization and greater inclusivity.

Writing and Community Action

Hopeful in tone, this book makes clear the ways that writing can serve as action in both academic and community contexts.

Author: Thomas Deans

Publisher: Longman Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780321094803

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 447

View: 887

Writing and Community Action: A Service-Learning Rhetoric and Reader encourages inquiry into community and social action issues, supports community-based research, and shepherds students through a range of service-learning writing projects. Several chapters offer pragmatic advice for crafting personal, reflective, and analytical essays, while service-learning chapters present experience-tested strategies for doing collaborative writing projects at nonprofit agencies, conducting research on pressing social problems, writing proposals that respond to campus and community concerns, and composing oral histories. The assignments help students to see themselves as writers whose work really matters. Provocative readings spark critical reflection on community service and a range of social concerns (including economic justice, literacy, education, homelessness, race, and identity). Focusing on invention, audience analysis, and the social purposes of writing, Writing and Community Action encourages students to adopt a rhetorical frame of mind. Hopeful in tone, this book makes clear the ways that writing can serve as action in both academic and community contexts.

Circulating Communities

Rather than feature only the voices of academic scholars, this collection features also the words of writing group participants, community organizers, literacy instructors, librarians, and stay-at-home parents as well.

Author: Paula Mathieu

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739167103

Category: Education

Page: 223

View: 842

Circulating Communities: The Tactics and Strategies of Community Publishing, edited by Paula Mathieu, Steve Parks, and Tiffany Rousculp, represents the first attempt to gather the myriad of community and college publishing projects, providing not only history and analysis but extended samples of the community writing produced. Rather than feature only the voices of academic scholars, this collection features also the words of writing group participants, community organizers, literacy instructors, librarians, and stay-at-home parents as well. In libraries, community centers, prisons, and homeless shelters across the US and around the world, people not traditionally understood as writers regularly come together to write, offer feedback, revise, publish and most importantly circulate their words. The vast amount of literature that these community-publishing projects create has historically been overlooked by scholars of literature, journalism, and literacy. Over the past decade, however, higher education has moved outward, off campus and into the streets. Many of these efforts build from writing and publication projects that extend back over decades, are grassroots in nature, and are independent of college efforts. Circulating Communities offers a unique glimpse into how neighbor and scholar, teacher and activist, are using writing and publishing to improve the daily lives on the streets they call home."