Heritage Communities and Archaeology

This book traces the development of 'community archaeology', identifying both its advantages and disadvantages by describing how and why tensions have arisen between archaeological and community understandings of the past.

Author: Laurajane Smith

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 147252134X

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 769

This book traces the development of 'community archaeology', identifying both its advantages and disadvantages by describing how and why tensions have arisen between archaeological and community understandings of the past. The focus of this book is the conceptual disjunction between heritage and data and the problems this poses for both archaeologists and communities in communicating and engaging with each other. In order to explain the extent of the miscommunication that can occur, the authors examine the ways in which a range of community groups, including communities of expertise, define and negotiate memory and identity. Importantly, they explore the ways in which these expressions are used, or are taken up, in struggles over cultural recognition - and ultimately, the practical, ethical, political and theoretical implications this has for archaeologists engaging in community work. Finally, they argue that there are very real advantages for archaeological research, theory and practice to be gained from engaging with communities.

Taking Archaeology Out of Heritage

This book aims to examine the conflation of heritage with archaeology that has occurred as a result.

Author: Emma Waterton

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 558

Archaeology has, on the whole, tended to dominate the development of public policies and practices applicable to what is often referred to as heritage. This book aims to examine the conflation of heritage with archaeology that has occurred as a result. To do so, it asks whether archaeology can usefully contribute to critical understandings of heritage, which, the volume contends, must consider heritage both in terms of what it is and the cultural, social and political work it does in contemporary societies. Archaeologists have been very successful in protecting what they perceive to be their databasea success that owes much to the development and maintenance of a suite of heritage management practices that work to legitimize their privileged access to, and control of, that database. However, is archaeological data actually heritage? Moreover, does archaeological knowledge offer a meaningful reflection of the historic environment, in terms of the uses, values and associations it carries for the various and different communities or publics that engage with that environment/heritage? The volume brings together academic and field archaeologists, academics from heritage studies and community activists from the UK and Europe more generally to debate these issues.

Cultural Heritage Communities

7 Emotional connections with the past: exploring engagement with historical images from an online museum collection -- Introduction -- Designing interaction for museum collections -- Tools for multi-user communities -- Making sense in ...

Author: Luigina Ciolfi

Publisher: Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities

ISBN: 9781138697195

Category: Cultural property

Page: 206

View: 849

Cultural heritage communities of interest have increasingly expanded from cultural heritage professionals to volunteers, special interest groups and independent citizen-led initiative groups. Digital technology has also increasingly impacted cultural heritage by affording novel experiences of it - it features in a number of activities for all the aforementioned groups, as well as acting as support for visitors to cultural heritage centres. With different degrees of formality and training, these communities are increasingly defining and taking ownership of what is of value to them, thus reconfiguring the care, communication, interpretation and validation of heritage. Digital technology has played a crucial role in this transformative process. In a fully international context, cultural heritage practitioners, community champions and academics from different fields of study have contributed to this book. Each chapter brings to the fore the multiple relationships between heritage, communities and technologies as a focus of study and reflection in an inclusive way. Contributions touch upon present and future opportunities for technology, as well as participatory design processes with different stakeholders. This book brings together ideas from different disciplines, cultures, methods and goals, to inspire scholars and practitioners involved in community heritage projects.

Heritage and Community Engagement

This book is about the way that professionals in archaeology and in other sectors of heritage interact with a range of stakeholder groups, communities and the wider public.

Author: Emma Waterton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317986571

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 845

This book is about the way that professionals in archaeology and in other sectors of heritage interact with a range of stakeholder groups, communities and the wider public. Whilst these issues have been researched and discussed over many years and in many geographical contexts, the debate seems to have settled into a comfortable stasis wherein it is assumed that all that can be done by way of engagement has been done and there is little left to achieve. In some cases, such engagement is built on legislation or codes of ethics and there can be little doubt that it is an important and significant aspect of heritage policy. This book is different, however, because it questions not so much the motivations of heritage professionals but the nature of the engagement itself, the extent to which this is collaborative or contested and the implications this has for the communities concerned. Furthermore, in exploring these issues in a variety of contexts around the world, it recognises that heritage provides a source of engagement within communities that is separate from professional discourse and can thus enable them to find voices of their own in the political processes that concern them and affect their development, identity and well-being. This book was published as a special issue of the International Journal of Heritage Studies.

Community Archaeology and Heritage in Africa

This volume provides new insights into the distinctive contributions that community archaeology and heritage make to the decolonization of archaeological practice.

Author: Peter R. Schmidt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317220757

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 985

This volume provides new insights into the distinctive contributions that community archaeology and heritage make to the decolonization of archaeological practice. Using innovative approaches, the contributors explore important initiatives which have protected and revitalized local heritage, initiatives that involved archaeologists as co-producers rather than leaders. These case studies underline the need completely reshape archaeological practice, engaging local and indigenous communities in regular dialogue and recognizing their distinctive needs, in order to break away from the top-down power relationships that have previously characterized archaeology in Africa. Community Archaeology and Heritage in Africa reflects a determined effort to change how archaeology is taught to future generations. Through community-based participatory approaches, archaeologists and heritage professionals can benefit from shared resources and local knowledge; and by sharing decision-making with members of local communities, archaeological inquiry can enhance their way of life, ameliorate their human rights concerns, and meet their daily needs to build better futures. Exchanging traditional power structures for research design and implementation, the examples outlined in this volume demonstrate the discipline’s exciting capacity to move forward to achieve its potential as a broader, more accessible, and more inclusive field.

Archaeology Cultural Heritage Protection and Community Engagement in South Asia

Exploring archaeology, community engagement and cultural heritage protection in South Asia, this book considers heritage management strategies through community engagement, bringing together the results of research undertaken by ...

Author: Robin Coningham

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9811362378

Category: Social Science

Page: 193

View: 848

Exploring archaeology, community engagement and cultural heritage protection in South Asia, this book considers heritage management strategies through community engagement, bringing together the results of research undertaken by archaeologists, heritage practitioners and policy makers working towards the preservation and conservation of both cultural and natural heritage. The book highlights the challenges faced by communities, archaeologists and heritage managers in post-conflict and post-disaster contexts in their efforts to protect, preserve and present cultural heritage, including issues of sustainability, linkages with existing community programmes and institutions, and building administrative and social networks. The case-studies illustrate larger-scale projects to small micro-level engagement, across a range of geographical, political, social and economic contexts, providing a framework that links and synchronises programmes of archaeological activities alongside active community engagement. The chapters ‘Introduction’, ‘Community Engagement in the Greater Lumbini Area of Nepal: the Micro-Heritage Case-Study of Dohani’ and ‘Conclusion’ of this book are available open access under a CC BY 4.0 license at link.springer.com.

Tradition Archaeological Heritage Protection and Communities in the Limpopo Province of South Africa

This book captures community voices in matters relating to their relationship with specific archaeological heritage sites and landscapes in the Limpopo Province of South Africa.

Author: Innocent Pikirayi

Publisher: African Books Collective

ISBN: 9994455680

Category: Archaeological sites

Page: 128

View: 825

This book captures community voices in matters relating to their relationship with specific archaeological heritage sites and landscapes in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. Focusing on the stonewalled archaeological heritage associated with Venda speakers and the reburial in 2008 of human remains excavated by the University of Pretoria from the cultural landscape of Mapungubwe, the book attempts to establish why archaeology and cultural heritage conservation struggle for relevance in South Africa today. In articulating the relevance of archaeology in South Africa in particular and southern Africa in general and in the context of public or community-based archaeology, the book explores how communities and the public interact, use and negotiate with their pasts. The research critiques the notion of archaeological heritage conservation and attempts to understand cultural heritage conservation from the perspectives of descendant communities. The book further exposes the conflict between cultural heritage protection efforts and modern development and questions the role of such efforts, given the challenges of unemployment, social inequality and poverty in democratic South Africa. The book is also about community engagement in archaeology, specifically in matters relating to access to cultural heritage resources. This study suggests that there is scope for community archaeology to take centre stage and drive future directions in archaeology if archaeologists change their approach in dealing with communities. Researchers are challenged in this study to rethink the notion of heritage, to debate the objectives behind cultural heritage conservation and to critically reexamine the relevance of archaeology today. This study suggests that the conflicting positions between heritage managers, archaeologists and descendant communities may be resolved through sharing of 'tradition' with the 'present'.

Bridging the Divide

The collected essays in this volume address contemporary issues regarding the relationship between Indigenous groups and archaeologists, including the challenges of dialogue, colonialism, the difficulties of working within legislative and ...

Author: Caroline Phillips

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1598743929

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 956

The collected essays in this volume address contemporary issues regarding the relationship between Indigenous groups and archaeologists, including the challenges of dialogue, colonialism, the difficulties of working within legislative and institutional frameworks, and NAGPRA and similar legislation. The disciplines of archaeology and cultural heritage management are international in scope and many countries continue to experience the impact of colonialism. In response to these common experiences, both archaeology and indigenous political movements involve international networks through which information quickly moves around the globe. This volume reflects these dynamic dialectics between the past and the present and between the international and the local, demonstrating that archaeology is a historical science always linked to contemporary cultural concerns.

Shared Knowledge Shared Power

This volume brings together the experiences and research of heritage practitioners, archaeologists, and educators to explore new and unique approaches to heritage studies.

Author: Veysel Apaydin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319686526

Category: Social Science

Page: 148

View: 886

This volume brings together the experiences and research of heritage practitioners, archaeologists, and educators to explore new and unique approaches to heritage studies. The last several decades have witnessed a rapid increase in the field of cultural heritage studies worldwide. This increase in the number of studies and in interest by the public as well as academics has effected substantial change in the understanding of heritage and approaches to heritage studies. This change has also impacted the perception of communities, how to study and protect the physical residues of heritage, and how to share the knowledge of heritage. It has brought the issue of who has knowledge and how the value of heritage can be shared more effectively with communities who then ascribe meaning and value to heritage materials. Heritage studies, until a few decades ago, exclusively studied the material culture of the past as part of elitist approaches that completely neglected communities’ rights to knowledge of their own heritage. Additionally, heritage practitioners and archaeologists neither shared this knowledge nor engaged with communities about their heritage. Communities were also mostly deprived from contributing to heritage and archaeological studies. This kind of top-down approach was quite common in many parts of the world. But recent studies and research in the field have shown the importance of including the public in projects, and that sharing the knowledge produced through heritage studies and archaeological works is significant for the protection and preservation of heritage materials; it has finally been understood that excluding the public from heritage is not ethical. This publication presents a wide array of case studies with different approaches and methods from many parts of the world to answer these questions.

Transforming Heritage Practice in the 21st Century

With the contents of this volume, we envision community archaeology to go beyond descriptions of outreach and public engagement to more critical and reflexive actions and thinking.

Author: John H. Jameson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3030143279

Category: Social Science

Page: 460

View: 837

Recent years have witnessed a rapid increase in the fields of cultural heritage studies and community archaeology worldwide with expanding discussions about the mechanisms and consequences of community participation. This trend has brought to the forefront debates about who owns the past, who has knowledge, and how heritage values can be shared more effectively with communities who then ascribe meaning and value to heritage materials. Globalization forces have created a need for contextualizing knowledge to address complex issues and collaboration across and beyond academic disciplines, using more integrated methodologies that include the participation of non-academics and increased stakeholder involvement. Successful programs provide power sharing mechanisms and motivation that effect more active involvement by lay persons in archaeological fieldwork as well as interpretation and information dissemination processes. With the contents of this volume, we envision community archaeology to go beyond descriptions of outreach and public engagement to more critical and reflexive actions and thinking. The volume is presented in the context of the evolution of cultural heritage studies from the 20th century “expert approach” to the 21st century “people-centered approach,” with public participation and community involvement at all phases of the decision-making process. The volume contains contributions of 28 chapters and 59 authors, covering an extensive geographical range, including Africa, South America, Central America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, North America, and Australasia. Chapters provide exemplary cases in a growing lexicon of public archaeology where power is shared within frameworks of voluntary activism in a wide diversity of cooperative settings and stakeholder interactions.

Maya Cultural Heritage

Situated at the intersection of cultural heritage and local community, this book enlarges our understanding of the Indigenous peoples of southern México and northern Central America who became detached from “the ancient Maya” through ...

Author: Patricia A. McAnany

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442241284

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 442

Situated at the intersection of cultural heritage and local community, this book enlarges our understanding of the Indigenous peoples of southern México and northern Central America who became detached from “the ancient Maya” through colonialism, government actions, and early twentieth-century anthropological and archaeological research. Through grass-roots heritage programs, local communities are reconnecting with a much valorized but distant past. Maya Cultural Heritage explores how community programs conceived and implemented in a collaborative style are changing the relationship among, archaeological practice, the objects of archaeological study, and contemporary ethnolinguistic Mayan communities. Rather than simply describing Maya sites, McAnany concentrates on the dialogue nurtured by these participatory heritage programs, the new “heritage-scapes” they foster, and how the diverse Maya communities of today relate to those of the past.

Pacific Island Heritage

"This volume emerges from a ground-breaking conference held in the Republic of Palau on cultural heritage in the Pacific.

Author: Jolie Liston

Publisher: ANU E Press

ISBN: 1921862483

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 236

"This volume emerges from a ground-breaking conference held in the Republic of Palau on cultural heritage in the Pacific. It includes bold investigations of the role of cultural heritage in identity-making, and the ways in which community engagement informs heritage management practices. This is the first broad and detailed investigation of the unique and irreplaceable cultural heritage of the Pacific from a heritage management perspective. It identifies new trends in research and assesses relationships between archaeologists, heritage managers and local communities. The methods which emerge from these relationships will be critical to the effective management of heritage sites in the 21st century. A wonderful book which emerges from an extraordinary conference. Essential reading for cultural heritage managers, archaeologists and others with an interest in caring for the unique cultural heritage of the Pacific Islands".

Intangible Heritage

This volume critically and reflexively examines these practices and policies, providing an accessible account of the different ways in which intangible cultural heritage has been defined and managed in both national and international ...

Author: Laurajane Smith

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781315657103

Category: Art

Page: 312

View: 945

The UNESCO Convention of the Safeguarding of the Intangible Heritagecame into force in 2006, framing the international and national practices and policies associated with intangible cultural heritage. This volume critically and reflexively examines these practices and policies, providing an accessible account of the different ways in which intangible cultural heritage has been defined and managed in both national and international contexts. As the volume reveals, the concept and practices of safeguarding are complicated and often contested, and there is a need for international debate about the meaning, nature and value of heritage and what it means to 'safeguard' it. Safeguarding Intangible Heritagepresents a significant cross section of ideas and practices from some of the key academics and practitioners working in the area, whose areas of expertise span anthropology, law, heritage studies, linguistics, archaeology, museum studies, folklore, architecture, Indigenous studies and history. The chapters in this volume give an overarching analysis of international policy and practice and critically frame case studies that analyze practices from a range of countries that include Australia, Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, New Zealand, Taiwan, UK, and Zimbabwe. With a focus on conceptual and theoretical issues, this book remains an important reference for students and heritage professionals.

Archaeology Heritage and Civic Engagement

Barbara Little and Paul Shackel, long-term leaders in the growth of a civically-engaged, relevant archaeology, outline a future trajectory for the field in this concise, thoughtful volume.

Author: Barbara J Little

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315433591

Category: Social Science

Page: 172

View: 422

The definition of “public archaeology” has expanded in recent years to include archaeologists’ collaborations with and within communities and activities in support of education, civic renewal, peacebuilding, and social justice. Barbara Little and Paul Shackel, long-term leaders in the growth of a civically-engaged, relevant archaeology, outline a future trajectory for the field in this concise, thoughtful volume. Drawing from the archaeological study of race and labor, among other examples, the authors explore this crucial opportunity and responsibility, then point the way for the discipline to contribute to the contemporary public good.

Empowering Communities Through Archaeology and Heritage

Armed with this book, practitioners will have both a theoretical foundation and practical approaches to consider when designing community projects"--

Author: Peter G. Gould

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9781350036253

Category: Archaeology

Page: 182

View: 276

"Peter G. Gould seeks to identify the essential success factors associated with a growing practice in archaeology: the sponsorship by archaeologists or heritage managers of local projects such as museums, tourism businesses, crafts cooperatives and similar activities within communities adjacent to archaeological or heritage sites. Typically, these are small projects intended to support economic advance in small communities. Rarely are they reported on in scholarly papers and, until now, they have never been subjected to study grounded in economic theory and practice. This is an area of study and analysis that is too important to lack suitable academic attention. This book argues that an essential factor in the success of community projects relates to the mechanisms used to govern the projects at the local level, and provides a much-needed systematical evaluation of the issues surrounding such governance. Drawing together theoretical insights from economics, political science, tourism scholarship, complexity scholarship, and non-profit best practices, it presents a model for community governance structures and illustrates the workings of that model through the four case studies. Armed with this book, practitioners will have both a theoretical foundation and practical approaches to consider when designing community projects"--

The Semiotics of Heritage Tourism

This book is a fast-paced and thorough re-evaluation of what heritage tourism means to the people who experience it.

Author: Dr. Emma Waterton

Publisher: Channel View Publications

ISBN: 1845414233

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 685

This book is a fast-paced and thorough re-evaluation of what heritage tourism means to the people who experience it. It draws on contemporary thinking in human geography and heritage studies, and applies it to a sector of tourism that is both pervasive yet poorly researched in terms of the perspective of tourists themselves. In a series of lucid and tightly argued chapters, it traces the use of semiotics as an analytical tool from its theoretical origins in text, through the all-important dynamics of visuality into an expanded realm of feeling and sensuality. Challenging assumptions about the way that heritage is experienced, this book uses examples from around the world to explore the semiotic landscape that surrounds heritage sites, linking what is represented about the past and how it feels to be there.

Participatory Archaeology and Heritage Studies

The chapters in this book were originally published in the Journal of Community Archaeology and Heritage.

Author: Peter R. Schmidt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351020889

Category: Social Science

Page: 136

View: 157

Participatory Archaeology and Heritage Studies: Perspectives from Africa provides new ways to look at and think about the practice of community archaeology and heritage studies across the globe. Long hidden from view, African experiences and experiments with participatory archaeology and heritage studies have poignant lessons to convey about local initiatives, local needs, and local perspectives among communities as diverse as an Islamic community on the edge of an ancient city in Sudan to multi-ethnic rural villages near rock art sites in South Africa. Straddling both heritage studies and archaeological practice, this volume incorporates a range of settings, from practical experiments with sustainable pottery kilns in Kenya, to an elite palace and its hidden traditional heritage in Northwestern Tanzania, to ancestral knowledge about heritage landscapes in rural Ethiopia. The genesis of participatory practices in Africa are traced back to the 1950s, with examples of how this legacy has played out over six decades—setting the scene for a deeply rooted practice now gaining widespread acceptance. The chapters in this book were originally published in the Journal of Community Archaeology and Heritage.

A Community Empowerment Approach to Heritage Management Open Access

This book presents an innovative approach to public archaeology in a rural community, which has had powerful results in terms of empowering a village community in Crete to become long-term guardians of their cultural heritage.

Author: Evangelos Kyriakidis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429769725

Category: Social Science

Page: 116

View: 630

This book presents an innovative approach to public archaeology in a rural community, which has had powerful results in terms of empowering a village community in Crete to become long-term guardians of their cultural heritage. Highlighting the theoretical and local contexts of the Philioremos Peak Sanctuary Public Archeology Project, this book explores the methodology and the project outcomes, and assesses best practice in the field of public archaeology within a rural community. As well as expanding the research on Minoan peak sanctuaries, the volume contributes to a greater understanding of how rural communities can be successfully engaged in the management of heritage, and is relevant to archaeologists and other heritage professionals wishing to understand the latest developments in public archaeology.

Safeguarding Intangible Heritage

This volume critically and reflexively examines these practices and policies, providing an accessible account of the different ways in which intangible cultural heritage has been defined and managed in both national and international ...

Author: Natsuko Akagawa

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429016409

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 155

The UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage came into force in 2006, framing the international and national practices and policies associated with intangible cultural heritage. This volume critically and reflexively examines these practices and policies, providing an accessible account of the different ways in which intangible cultural heritage has been defined and managed in both national and international contexts. As Safeguarding Intangible Heritage reveals, the concept and practices of safeguarding are complicated and often contested, and there is a need for international debate about the meaning, nature and value of heritage and what it means to ‘safeguard’ it. Safeguarding Intangible Heritage presents a significant cross section of ideas and practices from some of the key academics and practitioners working in the area, whose areas of expertise span anthropology, law, heritage studies, linguistics, archaeology, museum studies, folklore, architecture, Indigenous studies and history. The chapters in this volume give an overarching analysis of international policy and practice and critically frame case studies that analyze practices from a range of countries, including Australia, Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, New Zealand, Taiwan, the UK and Zimbabwe. With a focus on conceptual and theoretical issues, this follow-up to Intangible Heritage, by the same editors, will be of great interest to students, scholars and professionals working in the fields of heritage and museum studies, heritage conservation, heritage tourism, global history, international relations, art and architectural history, and linguists.

Politics Policy and the Discourses of Heritage in Britain

This book offers a critique of the dominant conceptualization of heritage found in policy, which tends to privilege the white, middle and upper classes.

Author: E. Waterton

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230292380

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 387

This book offers a critique of the dominant conceptualization of heritage found in policy, which tends to privilege the white, middle and upper classes. Using Britain as an illustration, Waterton explores how and why recent policies continue to lean towards the predictable melding of cultural diversity with tendencies of assimilation.