The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath Pileser III 744 727 BC and Shalmaneser V 726 722 BC Kings of Assyria

The volume provides reliable, up-to-date editions of seventy-three royal inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III and of his son and immediate successor Shalmaneser V, eleven late Neo-Assyrian inscriptions which may be attributed to one of those ...

Author: Hayim Tadmor

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 1575066572

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 611

The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744–727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726–722 BC), Kings of Assyria (Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period 1) carries on where the Assyrian Periods sub-series of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia (RIM) Project ended. The volume provides reliable, up-to-date editions of seventy-three royal inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III and of his son and immediate successor Shalmaneser V, eleven late Neo-Assyrian inscriptions which may be attributed to one of those two eighth-century rulers, and eight texts commissioned by Assyrian queens and high-ranking officials. Following the style of the now-defunct RIM series, each text edition (with its English translation) is supplied with a brief introduction containing general information, a catalogue containing basic information about all exemplars, a commentary containing further technical information and notes, and a comprehensive bibliography. RINAP 1 also includes: (1) a general introduction to the reigns of Tiglath-pileser III and Shalmaneser V, the corpus of inscriptions, previous studies, and dating and chronology; (2) translations of the relevant passages of Mesopotamian king lists and chronicles; (3) several photographs of objects inscribed with texts of Tiglath-pileser III and Shalmaneser V; (4) indices of museum and excavation numbers and selected publications; and (5) indices of proper names (Personal Names; Geographic, Ethnic, and Tribal Names; Divine Names; Gate, Palace, and Temple Names; and Object Names). The RINAP Project is under the direction of G. Frame (University of Pennsylvania) and is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Assyrian Royal Inscriptions From Tiglath pileser I to Ashur nasir apli II

English translation of Assyrian royal inscriptions.

Author: Albert Kirk Grayson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Akkadian language

Page: 213

View: 493

English translation of Assyrian royal inscriptions.

In preparing his new edition, Hayim Tadmor returned to first-hand copies of the texts, many of them prepared at the site. Their evidence is supplemented by related inscriptions discovered at Nimrud and elsewhere.

Author: Hayim Tadmor

Publisher: Israel Academy of Sciences

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 587

Assyrian royal scribes kept detailed records of the epoch-making campaigns and achievements of Tiglath-pileser III (r. 745-727 BCE), founder of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. The fragmentary remains of these inscriptions were discovered at Nimrud in 1845, but most of them were lost or reburied, leaving later scholars to rely on critically flawed editions. In preparing his new edition, Hayim Tadmor returned to first-hand copies of the texts, many of them prepared at the site. Their evidence is supplemented by related inscriptions discovered at Nimrud and elsewhere. The transcribed Akkadian text is accompanied by a critical apparatus, an English translation and an extensive philological and historical commentary. The introductory material, excursuses and supplementary studies treat a panoply of scholarly issues relating to the texts, including their historical and biblical context. Copious plates show the cuneiform texts in full and illustrate their positions in the original settings.

The Inscriptions of Tiglath Pileser III King of Assyria

Author: Eckart Frahm

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View: 146


The Inscriptions of Tiglath Pileser III

Author: Hayim Tadmor

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ISBN:

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View: 347


The Inscriptions of Tiglath pileser III King of Assyria

Author: Tiglath-pileser III (King of Assyria)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Akkadian language

Page: 317

View: 458


Inscription of Tiglath Pileser I King of Assyria

The inscription of Tiglath-Pileser I is inscribed on four large octagonal cylinders of clay, originally buried under the foundations of the four corners of the great temple of Kileh Sherghat, the ancient city of Assur, and now in the ...

Author:

Publisher: Dalcassian Publishing Company

ISBN: 1078751978

Category:

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View: 360

The beginning of Tiglath-Pileser’s I reign, laid heavy involvement in military campaigns, as suggested from translated texts from the Middle Assyrian period. The texts were believed to be “justification of war.” Although little literary text is available from the time of Tiglath-Pieser I, there is evidence to show that the reign of Tiglath-Pileser I inspired the act of recording information, including that of his military campaigns. Toward the end of Tiglath-Pileser’s reign literary texts took the form of “summary texts” which served as a vessel for as much information about his reign as possible, with the intent to be handed down to his successor.

Tiglath pileser III Founder of the Assyrian Empire

Several inscriptions are still unpublished. Tiglath-pileser's inscriptions can be divided into two categories: royal and nonroyal. The so-called Kalhu Annals were written near the end of his reign on sculpted slabs that decorated the ...

Author: Josette Elayi

Publisher: SBL Press

ISBN: 1628374306

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 106

Most modern historians consider Tiglath-pileser III, king of Assyria, to be the true founder of the Assyrian Empire. In Josette Elayi's latest work, she takes up this issue in her biography and history of his reign (745-727 BCE). Elayi explores questions surrounding how Tiglath-pileser managed to expand the Assyrian Empire after a period of weakness, what effects Assyrian domination had on Israel and Judah, and how the two kingdoms' fates differed. Using archaeological and textual remains from the period, she completes her trilogy of biographies, which includes Tiglath-pileser's successors, son Sargon II and grandson Sennacherib, who later led the Assyrian Empire to its greatest heights. Elayi provides yet another essential resource for scholars and students of Assyrian history and the Hebrew Bible.

Introductory Remarks to a New Edition of the Annals of Tiglath Pileser III

Author: Hayim Tadmor

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cuneiform inscriptions

Page: 19

View: 783


The Royal Inscriptions of Esarhaddon King of Assyria 680 669 BC

This new series is modeled on the publications of the now-defunct Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia (RIM) series and will carry on where its RIMA (Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia, Assyrian Periods) publications ended.

Author: Erle Leichty

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 1575066467

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 563

The Royal Inscription of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680–669 BC) is the inaugural volume of the Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period Project. The volume provides reliable, up-to-date editions of all of the known royal inscriptions of Esarhaddon, a son of Sennacherib who ruled Assyria for twelve years (680–669 BC). Editions of 143 firmly identifiable texts (which mostly describe successful battles and the completion of building projects, all done ad maiorem gloriam deorum), 29 poorly preserved late Neo-Assyrian inscriptions that may be attributed to him, and 10 inscriptions commissioned by his mother Naqia (Zakutu) and his wife Esharra-hammat are included. To make this corpus more user-friendly to both specialist and laymen, each text edition (with its English translation) is supplied with a brief introduction containing general information, a catalogue containing basic information about all exemplars, a commentary containing further technical information and notes, and a comprehensive bibliography (arranged chronologically from earliest to latest). The volume also includes: (1) a general introduction to the reign of Esarhaddon, the corpus of inscriptions, previous studies, and dating and chronology; (2) translations of the relevant passages of three Mesopotamian chronicles; (3) 19 photographs of objects inscribed with texts of Esarhaddon; (4) indexes of museum and excavation numbers and selected publications; and (5) indexes of proper names (Personal Names; Geographic, Ethnic, and Tribal Names; Divine, Planet, and Star Names; Gate, Palace, Temple, and Wall Names; and Object Names). The book is accompanied by a CD-ROM containing transliterations of selected inscriptions arranged in a ‘musical score’ format. The Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP) series will present up-to-date editions of the royal inscriptions of a number of late Neo-Assyrian rulers, beginning with Tiglath-pileser III (744–727 BC). This new series is modeled on the publications of the now-defunct Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia (RIM) series and will carry on where its RIMA (Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia, Assyrian Periods) publications ended. The project is under the direction of G. Frame (University of Pennsylvania) and is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.