Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia

The rise and fall of the Japanese empire constitutes one of the most dramatic episodes of modern history.

Author: Muhammad Abdul Aziz

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401192332

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 146

The rise and fall of the Japanese empire constitutes one of the most dramatic episodes of modern history. Within the short span of fifty years Japan grew out of political backwardness into a position of tremendous power. Japan's rise to power challenged Europe's hegemony over Asia, but, paradoxically, it was Japan's fall that caused the irreparable ruin of the colonial system over Eastern lands. Japan went to war against the West under the battlecry of Asia's liberation from European colonialism. In reality, for forty years, beginning with her first war against China, she had striven to imitate this colonialism, as she had endeavoured to imitate the political, military and economic achievements of Europe. A thorough understanding of the imitative character of the Japanese Empire might well have induced the leaders of the nation to side with the conservative trend of political thought in the Western world in order to maintain the existing world-wide political system of which colonial rule was an accepted part. They might have understood that an adventurous, revolutionary policy was bound to result in grave dangers for their own state and most conservative structure. Japan might have continued to grow and to expand if she had succeeded to play the role of the legitimate heir to Europe's decaying power in Asia. By violently opposing that power, she undermined the very foun dations of her own rule outside the home-islands.

Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia

Author: Muhammad Abdul Aziz

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780598851253

Category: Japan

Page: 271

View: 610


Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia

Author: Muḥammad ʻAbdulʻaziz

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Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia The Hague M Nijhoff 1955

Author: Muhammed Abdul Aziz

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ISBN:

Category: Japan

Page: 271

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Japan s colonialism and Indonesia

Author: Muhammad Abdul Aziz

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Category:

Page: 264

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Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia Proefschrift Etc

Author: M. A. MUḢAMMAD 'ABD AL-'AZĪZ

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ISBN:

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Page: 264

View: 775


Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia By M A Aziz

Author: Muhammed Abdul Aziz

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ISBN:

Category: Japan

Page: 271

View: 158


Japan s Colonialism and Indonesia

Author: Moustapha Abdel Aziz

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The Blue Eyed Enemy

These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions.

Author: Theodore Friend

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400859468

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 378

The Blue-Eyed Enemy is a comprehensive account of the interwoven histories of the three major archipelago-nations of the West Pacific during the years of the Second World War. Theodore Friend examines Japanese colonialism in Indonesia and the Philippines as an example of recurring patterns of domination and repression in that region. He depicts Japanese rule in Greater East Asia as expressive of the folly of the general who exhorted his troops "to annihilate the blue-eyed enemy and their black slaves." At the same time he clearly shows where the return of Western power aimed at new links between conqueror and conquered, or lords and bondsmen. Throughout the work one encounters an infectious sympathy for those afflicted by imperialism and racism from whatever source, at whatever time. The book is based on documentary research in Japan, Indonesia, and the Philippines, as well as in the United States and the Netherlands, and on over one hundred interviews with major actors and key observers of the era. The analysis balances an eclectic use of social science perspectives with a humanistic concreteness, and leads to new understanding of leaders like Sukarno and Hatta, Jose P. Laurel and Benigno Aquino, Sr., and Generals Yamashita and MacArthur. As comparative tropical history, it elucidates the contrasting cultural traditions and political psychologies of Indonesia and the Philippines and explains why 1945 was a year of dramatic contrast: "reoccupation" and revolution for the first country, and "liberation" and restoration for the latter. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Japans colonialism and Indonesia by M u ammad A bdal Aziz

Author: Muḥammad 'Abdal'azīz

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 264

View: 381


Some Aspects of Indonesian Politics Under the Japanese Occupation

Mr. Anderson's present study deals with the earliest period of the broader study which he envisages. He wishes it emphasized that the account offered here is an interim report, not a completed mono-graph.

Author: Benedict R. Anderson

Publisher: Equinox Pub

ISBN: 9786028397292

Category: History

Page: 156

View: 978

The Indonesian revolution, its origins, the course of its development, and its relation to current conditions in Indonesian society has always been a subject of major concern to the Cornell Modern Indonesia Project. Among the principal gaps in the coverage of its history (where both Indonesian and other Asian and Western scholars have given relatively little attention) are the background provided by the final year of Japanese occupation and an account of the first few months of independence, a critical time in which the revolutionary forces acquired their first institutional form. It is a matter of great regret that most of those Indonesians best qualified to write about this period have had little opportunity for doing so because of their preoccupation with governmental administration and other heavy duties. In the past decade, during which research on Indonesia has taken root at Cornell University, there has been only one substantial study relating to this period, Professor Harry J. Benda's doctoral dissertation, later published under the title of The Crescent and the Rising Sun. (The only other significant studies in English, Dr. M. A. Aziz's Japan's Colonialism and Indonesia and Professor W. H. Elsbree's Japan's Role in Southeast Asian Nationalist Movements, 1940-1945 were written without access to the substantial body of documents available to Dr. Benda and Mr. Anderson in Cornell University Library's collection on the Japanese occupation of Indonesia.) Subsequently, a study of outstanding importance has appeared in Japan, Indoneshia ni okeru Nippon gunsei no kenkyu (A Study of the Effects of the Japanese Military Occupation on Indonesia) by Shigetada Nishijima, Koichi Kishi, et al.; but, unfortunately, this exists only in the Japanese language and has not as yet been translated into English or Indonesian. Mr. Benedict Anderson, a member of the Cornell Southeast Asia Program's Modern Indonesia Project and for two years chief teaching assistant in the University's Department of Government, is currently on his way to Indonesia to undertake research concerning the revolutionary period (1945-1949). It is my hope and expectation that as a consequence he will be able to explore the history of the period in a balanced and scholarly way. I believe that the quality of his work in this present Interim Report, one based only on resources available at Cornell, is a substantial earnest of his capacity for doing so. Mr. Anderson's present study deals with the earliest period of the broader study which he envisages. He wishes it emphasized that the account offered here is an interim report, not a completed mono-graph. It represents his preliminary research, based on the incomplete sources available to him at Cornell. Many of his data are regarded by him as tentative and subject to confirmation or revision - depending upon the information which he encounters during his research in Indonesia. So that this study may be improved, he and I hope that he may secure the cooperation and the full, candid criticism of knowledgeable Indonesian scholars and officials. - George McT. Kahin, September 29, 1961

Outlasting Colonialism

Author: Frank Dhont

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 706

View: 478


Commodities and Colonialism

During the period 1880-1942 covered by this book, however, the then Netherlands Indies was one of the world's very greatest producer-exporters of the commodity. How it contrived to do so is the story presented in this book. Book jacket.

Author: G. Roger Knight

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004250514

Category: Political Science

Page: 291

View: 632

Sugar yesterday was what oil is today: a commodity of immense global importance whose tentacles reached deep into politics, society and economy. Indonesia's colonial-era sugar industry is largely forgotten today, except by a small number of regional specialists writing for a specialist audience. During the period 1880-1942 covered by this book, however, the then Netherlands Indies was one of the world's very greatest producer-exporters of the commodity. How it contrived to do so is the story presented in this book. Book jacket.

INDO A Creative Memoir

'INDO' is more than a war story. It's the story of three generations, a tale of love and desertion, family loyalty, a way of life gone forever, hate and forgiveness - peace and redemption. Rudy van Tongeren's life was close to perfect.

Author: Willem Rudolph van Tongeren

Publisher: Jacqueline Boell

ISBN: 0646843583

Category: History

Page: 532

View: 610

'INDO' is more than a war story. It's the story of three generations, a tale of love and desertion, family loyalty, a way of life gone forever, hate and forgiveness - peace and redemption. Rudy van Tongeren's life was close to perfect. The eldest son of parents of Dutch and Indonesian descent, whose father held a prestigious job with the Dutch colonial government in Java, Rudy had just qualified as a school principal in 1939. He was 22. He was looking forward to a genteel and fulfilling life as the head of a government school who would one day become a history professor at a university. Three days after he graduated, he was conscripted into the Royal Dutch Navy. It was 1939 and the threat of war darkened skies over Europe. Two and a half years later, Japan bombed the Americans at Pearl Harbor and attacked Southeast Asia. In early 1942 Japan invaded Indonesia, then known as the Dutch East Indies, and Rudy and his navy mates were captured and sent to brutal POW camps. He was sent to Japan to build enemy warships at Nagasaki and later witnessed the obliteration caused by the A-bomb. Rudy’s camp was liberated, he rejoined the navy and later migrated to Australia where he met and married a woman from Adelaide, built his own house in suburban Melbourne, became a teacher and raised nine children. In 1992 he went to Japan to find the prison guard who secretly gave him extra food during incarceration. He missed the guard by one year but found peace – and forgiveness.

The Japanese Wartime Empire 1931 1945

With this book the editors complete the three-volume series on modern Japanese colonialism and imperialism that began with The Japanese Colonial Empire, 1895-1945 (Princeton, 1983) and The Japanese Informal Empire in China, 1895-1937 ...

Author: Peter Duus

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400844371

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 793

With this book the editors complete the three-volume series on modern Japanese colonialism and imperialism that began with The Japanese Colonial Empire, 1895-1945 (Princeton, 1983) and The Japanese Informal Empire in China, 1895-1937 (Princeton, 1989). The Japanese military takeover in Manchuria between 1931 and 1932 was a critical turning point in East Asian history. It marked the first surge of Japanese aggression beyond the boundaries of its older colonial empire and set Japan on a collision course with China and Western colonial powers from 1937 through 1945. These essays seek to illuminate some of the more significant processes and institutions during the period when the empire was at war: the creation of a Japanese-dominated East Asian economic bloc centered in northeast Asia, the mobilization of human and physical resources in the older established areas of Japanese colonial rule, and the penetration and occupation of Southeast Asia. Introduced by Peter Duus, the volume contains four sections: Japan's Wartime Empire and the Formal Colonies (Carter J. Eckert and Wan-yao Chou), Japan's Wartime Empire and Northeast Asia (Louise Young, Y. Tak Matsusaka, Ramon H. Myers, and Takafusa Nakamura), Japan's Wartime Empire and Southeast Asia (Mark R. Peattie, E. Bruce Reynolds, and Ken'ichi Goto), and Japan's Wartime Empire in Other Perspectives (George Hicks, Hideo Kobayashi, and L. H. Gann).

History and Development of Aspects on Ludruk Setting During the Colonial Period in Indonesia

Seminar paper from the year 2019 in the subject Theater Studies, Dance, grade: 1,7, Free University of Berlin, language: English, abstract: Nowadays, if we ask an Indonesian about ludruk, most of them would assume that ludruk as one of the ...

Author: Umi Maisaroh

Publisher:

ISBN: 9783346239396

Category:

Page: 28

View: 193

Seminar paper from the year 2019 in the subject Theater Studies, Dance, grade: 1,7, Free University of Berlin, language: English, abstract: Nowadays, if we ask an Indonesian about ludruk, most of them would assume that ludruk as one of the traditional art performances. After the Indonesian independence, particularly during the Soeharto period, ludruk is apparently "retreated" became traditional theatre. Before that, ludruk was an art performance that finds its way to modernization. The researchers admit that during colonialism, ludruk in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, was a part of "the culture of modern society". This study analyzes ludruk in the colonialism era, particularly the transition from the Dutch to the Japanese colonialism in Indonesia, since, ludruk could reach its peak of development at that time. Ludruk no longer holds its ritual values, even it evolves from an entertainment to a performance that served as a political movement. This study is based on several articles, journals, essays, dissertations, and books. Art and culture in the Indonesian archipelago have been researched quite a lot, not only by Indonesian scholars but also by foreign researchers. Ludruk itself has been also widely researched. James L. Peacock (1968) in his book Rites of modernization studies widely about ludruk. His research focuses on ludruk in the pra-Soeharto era. Another source is a study about religion in Java by Geertz (1959). His study focuses on the Javanese ritual ceremony-slametan. He also mentions that ludruk, like any other the Javanese theatrical forms, is based on the religious ritual ceremony. Another interesting source is from J. Ras (1979) Javanese literature since independence. It is a collection of articles in Javanese languages. One of its articles reported a chronologically ludruk history and its developing, which is written by Ki Soemadji Adjiwongsokoesoemo.

Understanding Indonesia in the 21st Century

Author: Selena Lai

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Colonialism

Page: 233

View: 961


Colonialism and Nationalism in Asian Cinema

" -- The Journal of Asian Studies "This is an excellent model for studies in how the popular, art, and experimental cinemas function in the consideration of nationhood as a configuration of symbols.

Author: Wimal Dissanayake

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253116475

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 358

"... an important collective work for communication practitioners, students, and scholars who want to have a deeper understanding of film making in Asia and of the promotion of nationalism through communication." -- Media Asia "... a momentous contribution to the study of colonialism and postcoloniality in Asia... " -- The Journal of Asian Studies "This is an excellent model for studies in how the popular, art, and experimental cinemas function in the consideration of nationhood as a configuration of symbols.... This anthology provides an interesting discussion by offering a theoretical framework from which to examine the complex topics of nation, state, identity formation, and collective history in the realm of cinema. It becomes an even more effective tool by playing itself out within a diverse Asian context." -- Afterimage Essays examine the representation of the interlocking discourses of nationhood and history in Asian cinema, dealing with film traditions in Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka, and Australia.

The Indonesian Story The Birth Growth and Structure of the Indonesian Republic

THE INDONESIAN STORY- The Birth, Growth and Structure of the Indonesian Republic.

Author: Charles Wolf

Publisher: France Press

ISBN: 1443722316

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 612

THE INDONESIAN STORY- The Birth, Growth and Structure of the Indonesian Republic. PREFACE: It is not surprising that the islands of the Indies have more than once been referred to as the cultural melting pot of Asia. The founding of the Hindu kingdom of Taruma in Western Java brought the rich heritage of ancient India to Indonesia over 1200 years ago. Later, pilgrims from India introduced Gau tamas teachings to the islands, and in the 8th and 9th centuries Buddhism reached its apogee with the hegemony of the Sumatran Empire of Shrivijaya. The remarkable Borobodur, with its countless carved stone figures of the Buddha, still stands in Middle Java as a monument to Buddhist art. In the 14th century the Madjapahit Empire, extending from New Guinea in the East to Sumatra in the West, brought about a fusion of the Brahman-Buddhist strains in Indonesian culture. Madjapahit later fell before the crusading vigor of Islam. By the end of the 15th century Mohammedanism had been accepted in all of Java and thence it spread to other parts of the archipelago. The acceptance of Islam was in many cases merely nominal. To this day Hindu influence remains in Indonesia as a sort of subtle pantheism, combined with a naturalist paganism in the more remote parts of the islands. In Bali and several of the remoter parts of Indonesia, Islam has never been adopted. There the Brahman-Buddhist-naturalist traditions have endured to the present day, still basically unchanged. Western penetration into Indonesia began in the 16th century with the arrival of the Portuguese, who were ousted in 1595 by the Dutch. Gradually bringing the outer islands under formal control, the Dutch erected a colonial structure which was to last until World War II. But as the Dutch colonial structure matured, Indonesian nationalism evolved. The nationalist movement gathered increasing momentum after the turn of the century. When the Japanese occu pied the islands at the start of 1942, it grew at an accelerated pace and with Japans surrender, the nationalists prepared for what they hoped would be a new era in Indonesias history. On August 17 1945, the Republic of Indonesia proclaimed its independence. This is where the present book begins. For the people of Indonesia, the surrender of the Japanese to the Allies meant the beginning rather than the end of war or more pre cisely, it meant the beginning of their war and the end of a foreign war. They had been affected by World War II. It had been waged partly on their lands and seas. They had suffered during four years under a Japanese misrule harsher than anything they had expe rienced during three hundred and fifty years of Dutch colonialism. But in Indonesia, and the other areas of Southeast Asia, the people had never really become a party to or partisans of the war. There were small pro-Ally resistance groups in Indonesia, and a few ardent Japanese supporters as well. But in general, World War II remained for the people of Indonesia a struggle among alien forces. During the Japanese occupation, the seeds of Indonesian national ism burgeoned. To some degree this was the result of Japanese propaganda. To a larger degree it was independent of Japanese in fluence and quite often a reaction against it. Starting from the as sumption that the Japanese overlord was only a temporary master, the intellectual leaders of the nationalist movement in Indonesia began to prepare for their real problem resistance to a post-war restoration of colonialism...

Anthropology and Colonialism in Asia

And this insinuation was assumed to somehow weaken the theoretical claims of anthropology and its fieldwork achievements. What this collection demonstrates is that colonialism was not only a Western phenomenon, but 'Eastern' as well.

Author: Jan van Bremen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136105867

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 265

For a time it was almost a cliche to say that anthropology was a handmaiden of colonialism - by which was usually meant 'Western' colonialism. And this insinuation was assumed to somehow weaken the theoretical claims of anthropology and its fieldwork achievements. What this collection demonstrates is that colonialism was not only a Western phenomenon, but 'Eastern' as well. And that Japanese or Chinese anthropologists were also engaged in studying subject peoples. But wherever they were and whoever they were anthropologists always had a complex and problematic relationship with the colonial state. The latter saw some anthropologists' sympathy for 'the natives' as a threat, while on the other hand anthropological knowledge was used for the training of colonial officials. The impact of the colonial situation on the formation of anthropological theories is an important if not easily answered question, and the comparison of experiences in Asia offered in this book further helps to illuminate this complex relationship.