Love and Other Thought Experiments

Longlisted for the Booker Prize 2020 Featuring on BBC 2's Between the Covers 'Sophie Ward is a dazzling talent who writes like a modern-day F Scott Fitzgerald' Elizabeth Day, author of How To Fail 'An act of such breath-taking imagination, ...

Author: Sophie Ward

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1472154584

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 380

Longlisted for the Booker Prize 2020 'Sophie Ward is a dazzling talent who writes like a modern-day F Scott Fitzgerald' Elizabeth Day, author of How To Fail 'An act of such breath-taking imagination, daring and detail that the journey we are on is believable and the debate in the mind non-stop. There are elements of Doris Lessing in the writing - a huge emerging talent here' Fiona Shaw 'A towering literary achievement' Ruth Hogan, author of The Keeper of Lost Things Rachel and Eliza are planning their future together. One night in bed Rachel wakes up terrified and tells Eliza that an ant has crawled into her eye and is stuck there. Rachel is certain; Eliza, a scientist, is sceptical. Suddenly their entire relationship is called into question. What follows is a uniquely imaginitive sequence of interlinked stories ranging across time, place and perspective to form a sparkling philosophical tale of love, lost and found across the universe.

Love and Other Thought Experiments

This impressive debut novel, longlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize, takes its premise and inspiration from ten of the best-known thought experiments in philosophy—the what-ifs of philosophical investigation—and uses them to talk about ...

Author: Sophie Ward

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 059331431X

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 690

This impressive debut novel, longlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize, takes its premise and inspiration from ten of the best-known thought experiments in philosophy--the what-ifs of philosophical investigation--and uses them to talk about love in a wholly unique way. Married couple Rachel and Eliza are considering having a child. Rachel wants one desperately, and Eliza thinks she does, too, but she can't quite seem to wrap her head around the idea. When Rachel wakes up screaming one night and tells Eliza that an ant has crawled into her eye and is stuck there, Eliza initially sees it as a cry for attention. But Rachel is adamant. She knows it sounds crazy--but she also knows it's true. As a scientist, Eliza is skeptical. Suddenly their entire relationship is called into question. What follows is a uniquely imaginative sequence of ten interconnecting episodes--each from a different character's perspective--inspired by some of the best-known thought experiments in philosophy. Together they form a sparkling philosophical tale of love lost and found across the universe.

Requiem for a Knave

With the deft touch of a master storyteller, Laura Carlin recreates the dangerous world Alwin must navigate as they flee the comforts of home for an entirely new life' Sophie Ward, author of Love and other Thought Experiments READERS' ...

Author: Laura Carlin

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1473661455

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 735

From the author of The Wicked Cometh comes a dark, page-turning tale of passion and romance in the darkest of places. . . 'Carlin can tell a good story' Observer 'A book of great beauty and lyricism' On Magazine After the death of his mother, young Alwin of Whittaker leaves the only home he has ever known to seek answers about his unknown father through a pilgrimage to the shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham. On the journey, Alwin falls in with a band of violent and marauding soldiers and is witness to their terrible crimes. When Alwin later joins up with a group of pilgrims, he must hide his identity . . . but he is not the only one with secrets to keep. Rosamund, a young woman travelling the same path, has much to conceal too. The journey to discovering who he really is will lead Alwin into great danger and great passion. These are dark times, and through them, Alwin must shine a light. Will the revelations to come destroy everything that came before? 'Effortlessly transports the reader to fourteenth-century rural Derbyshire and the plight of young Alwin. With the deft touch of a master storyteller, Laura Carlin recreates the dangerous world Alwin must navigate as they flee the comforts of home for an entirely new life' Sophie Ward, author of Love and other Thought Experiments READERS' PRAISE FOR REQUIEM FOR A KNAVE: 'Hugely engaging' 'A gem of an historical novel with beautiful atmospheric writing' 'I loved Laura's first book and this is another fun, dark historical novel full of twists and turns. Atmospheric and passionate' 'Laura Carlin charmed and bewitched me with her Victorian era debut The Wicked Cometh and here again I am willingly sucked into the dark medieval world of pilgrims, lords and villains' 'Beautifully written with strongly portrayed characters, A very good read' 'The author gives us fully rounded, engaging characters, a compelling story and beautiful, lyrical prose. I loved this even more than The Wicked Cometh' 'A lyrical and engaging novel, with beautiful writing and a gripping storyline'

The Revelations

literary thought experiment . " SOPHIE WARD , Booker Prize - longlisted author of
Love and Other Thought Experiments " The Revelations is a stunningly written ,
Escheresque novel , concerned with the great mysteries of our age . It left me ...

Author: Erik Hoel

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 164700098X

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 268

An edgy and ambitious debut by a powerful new voice in contemporary literary fiction Monday, Kierk wakes up. Once a rising star in neuroscience, Kierk Suren is now homeless, broken by his all-consuming quest to find a scientific theory of consciousness. But when he’s offered a spot in a prestigious postdoctoral program, he decides to rejoin society and vows not to self-destruct again. Instead of focusing on his work, however, Kierk becomes obsessed with another project—investigating the sudden and suspicious death of a colleague. As his search for truth brings him closer to Carmen Green, another postdoc, their list of suspects grows, along with the sense that something sinister may be happening all around them. The Revelations, not unlike its main character, is ambitious and abrasive, challenging and disarming. Bursting with ideas, ranging from Greek mythology to the dark realities of animal testing, to some of the biggest unanswered questions facing scientists today, The Revelations is written in muscular, hypnotic prose, and its cyclically dreamlike structure pushes the boundaries of literary fiction. Erik Hoel has crafted a stunning debut of rare power—an intense look at cutting-edge science, consciousness, and human connection.

Why We are Not what We Think We are

We wish to find general causal laws by which the ' event of our existence is
related to other events . ... Each of us has probably been told by his parents that
he should be glad about their having met and falling in love with each other , as
otherwise he would not have come into existence . ... We see that every causal
explanation comprises a thought experiment : It is asked what would have
happened if the ...

Author: Andreas Trupp

Publisher: Peter Lang Gmbh, Internationaler Verlag Der Wissenschaften

ISBN:

Category: Identity (Philosophical concept)

Page: 113

View: 889

Questions about personal identity and about time affect us all. The concern for «our» future and the fear of «our» death are based on (mostly vague) concepts of personal identity over time. Though the atomic components of our present body are not identical with the ones shown on our childhood photos, we have no doubts in recognizing ourselves on those pictures. Similarly, we are convinced that «we» will be able to recognize «ourselves» on our present passport-photos even in the future. Is this confidence justified? If it is not, our conception of life and death would be as faulty as was the image of the universe in the Middle Ages.

The Jottery

Think of this as The Book of Questions for creative types, from writers and artists, to idea gurus and daydreamers, perfect for writing classes, train rides, parties, meditation retreats, game nights, insomnia bouts, lulls in dates or low ...

Author: Andy Selsberg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698409884

Category: Self-Help

Page: 224

View: 432

In The Jottery, you'll find a series of prompts, suggestions, commands, and questions that are intended to cause neurons to fire and a spectrum of ideas to surface--possibly good, potentially useful, conceivably profitable, maybe illuminating, and hopefully amusing. There's also a chance you'll come up with nothing, and experience a beautiful "idea-lessness" that would be the envy of Zen monks everywhere. Also a win. Think of this as The Book of Questions for creative types, from writers and artists, to idea gurus and daydreamers, perfect for writing classes, train rides, parties, meditation retreats, game nights, insomnia bouts, lulls in dates or low points in relationships, company brainstorming meetings, waiting rooms, therapy sessions, and more. The dozens of ingenious prompts include: You create something called Soul Lotion. What are the best places to rub it? (Don’t limit your answer to human body parts.) You're commissioned to design a bridge to nowhere. Briefly describe possible nowheres you might build it to. Where did the fun go? Suggest four hyper-specific places. If you do manage to track the fun down and tie it to a chair, what do you do or do with it? You're commissioned to write a pilot script for a post-apocalyptic sitcom. It’s based not on the next post-apocalyptic period, but the one after that, after a new civilization arises and collapses. What are seven things you do to celebrate this cool new job? You design vending machines that sell things that are not physical objects. Like what? And for how much? List twelve things you can have instead of “it all.” List a handful of elevator tension-breakers, and a handful of elevator tension-makers.

Wise Therapy

' These are perhaps not the sort of questions that require psychiatric intervention, but Arnaud, who recently completed the first empirical study of philosophical counselling in the UK, has found that within just five sessions the majority ...

Author: Tim LeBon

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9780826452078

Category: Psychology

Page: 208

View: 384

Independent on Sunday October 2nd One of the country's leading philosophical counsellers, and chairman of the Society for Philosophy in Practice (SPP), Tim LeBon, said it typically took around six 50 minute sessions for a client to move from confusion to resolution. Mr LeBon, who has 'published a book on the subject, Wise Therapy, said philosophy was perfectly suited to this type of therapy, dealing as it does with timeless human issues such as love, purpose, happiness and emotional challenges. `Wise Therapy, is part of a series aimed at promoting an integrative attitude as its ethos. Among all the many perspectives of psychotherapists and counselors, philosophy needs to take its place and needs to find its voice. Tim LeBon has provided an effective means by which counselors can bring philosophy into their work with clients' - APPA journal `Tim Le Bon's Wise Therapy is a comprehensible and well argued book dealing with the practical therapeutic applications of philosophical research that may well be of interest to philosophers but -- as the author himself intends -- will be of most obvious benefit to therapists and counselors, both by informing their dialogue with clients in new ways and by helping them become more informed about ways to resolve the ethical dilemmas arising within the context of their own work' - Metapsychology `A fascinating workshop for therapists and clients, backed up a thorough degree if philosophical acuity' - Journal of the Society for Existential Analysis `I strongly recommend the book for philosophers as well as practitioners, teachers, students and supervisors in counselling and psychotherapy' - Self and Society `Provides some additional and valuable arrows for the therapist's quiver' - Irvin Yalom, author of Love's Executioner `Like Aristotle, Tim LeBon examines what is said and extracts what is best from it.... There are many fascinating exercises designed to bring out and enlighten the client's values, conception of the good life, well-being, happiness, pleasure, and the proper place of reason in life.... Wise Therapy is well written and engaging. The case histories are illuminating examples of therapeutic techniques at work, the thought experiments are well designed, and the philosophical position adapted from the internal debates of the philosophers is level headed.... I recommend it highly to philosophers with an interest in counselling, and psychological counsellors with an interest in philosophy' - Jeff Mason, The Philosophers' Magazine `Tim LeBon has... authored a text which should become a staple on the philosophical counsellor's bookshelf.... Wise Therapy is a concise, well-written book.... His ability to relate philosophical concepts to counselling concerns is admirable and attests to the skill and knowledge he possesses as a working counsellor. But, by far the most important part of Tim LeBon's book to PC is the last chapter, "The Counsellor's Philosophical Toolbox"' - Craig Munns in The Examined Life ` Tim LeBon has done a good job of offering practical approaches to some of the most important and vexing issues that arise in counselling.... Tim LeBon's book contains helpful suggestions, practical information, and useful examples, and would make a good addition to the library of any counsellors willing to allow philosophy to turn mere client sessions into wise therapy' - Peter Raabe, Practical Philosophy Wise Therapy is an original and practical guide to how philosophy can benefit counselling and psychotherapy. Tim LeBon argues that therapy, informed by philosophy, can help clients make better decision and achieve emotional wisdom. He uses philosophical approaches to explore issues of right and wrong, the emotions and reasons, well-being and the meaning of life, and develops a 'counsellor's toolbox' of techniques that can help practitioners apply the wisdom of philosophy to good therapeutic practice. For counsellors who may find philosophical approaches to therapy useful, this work addresses key philosophical topics - the emotions, free will, the meaning of life and ethics. It is jargon-free where possible and assumes no previous philosophical training. From The Independent, 16th November 2004 Plato is my agony aunt It was the end of a love affair that broke her heart. Could the wisdom of the great philosophers show her how to be happy again? Claire Smith tries a novel form of therapy "The unexamined life is not worth living," Socrates said. Nor is the life you're left with after your boyfriend has left you for another woman - at least, that's how it felt in October last year when mine broke rank and went off with an art student from Cleveland, Ohio. We were over there for the opening of his new art exhibition. He'd flown over four days before me and had met her at a party. Supposedly, they "connected". The five months that followed were a roller-coaster of confusion, vitriol and despair. I knew there'd been problems in our relationship. We saw the world very differently; he delighted in the charm of the ordinary, I wanted maximum divinity. He walked; I galloped. He drank tea; I loathed the stuff. But, along the banks of the Thames, we'd made a promise to always stick together. Our love was something unique: "transcendental", I called it. And besides, we recycled. Surely a commitment to save the world would save our relationship? Alas, no. So there I was, a woman scorned. Hell truly hath no greater fury. And what made it worse was that I still believed in our transcendental love. If I wanted to change the way I was feeling, I needed to alter the way I was thinking. But how? A few bottles of wine and a sharp blow to the head might have done the trick. Fortunately, there's an older, more trusted way of turning your head on its head that counsellors are starting to use: philosophy. The idea of employing Plato as an agony aunt was begun in 1981 by the German philosopher Gerd Achenbach. Although philosophy spends a lot of its time asking real-life questions that affect real-life people - What is happiness? And is it always wrong to lie? - most of the debate goes on in ivory towers. What Achenbach and subsequent philosophers including Tim LeBon, the chairman of the UK's Society for Philosophy in Practice, wanted to do was "give practical application" to this gigantic library of great thoughts. So how does it work? Like most types of therapy, you sign up for a set of sessions. "Two would give you a new perspective on one issue; six would help you to make a major life-decision, like a career change; with 12 you can start to rethink your entire life philosophy," explains LeBon. Each session lasts 50 minutes and costs £50 - and, no, you don't have to have any previous knowledge of philosophy. "If you think of Friends, it would suit Ross and Chandler more than Joey," LeBon says. "It's for anyone who wants to make their emotions more intelligent. Or for those who have tried other kinds of therapy, and want something more cerebral." The first session begins with the patient venting off about whatever's troubling them. The rant over, the counsellor then picks out some key concepts that are crucial to the problem - in the case of heartbreak, it is love and happiness that come hurtling to the fore - and then gets the patient to define what they mean. So, what is love? What is happiness? To kick-start the patient's thinking, LeBon describes what a great philosopher had to say about it. In my case, he tells me what Plato wrote about love in his Symposium: that to stop man fighting the gods, Zeus decided to cut each human in two, so they would lose their strength. "This, then, is the source of our desire to love each other," Plato said. "Each of us is a 'matching half' of a human whole, because each was sliced like a flatfish, two out of one, and each of us is always seeking the half that matches him." This method of probing what we might think are "obvious" ideas, such as love and happiness, was devised by Socrates in the squares of Athens. "The only I thing I know is that I know nothing at all," he boasted. What Socrates showed was that although many of the thinkers of his time thought they knew what justice, happiness and goodness meant, their understanding was tied in to their personal agenda and world view, and, what's more, when pushed, their ideas often contradicted themselves. A bit like me on love. Whereas part of my understanding of love was something that gave life meaning, made it worth living and bound us together, I also believed that true love was "transcendental": that it was out of this world, and it didn't matter if the two people who loved each other couldn't get along in the day-to-day. Love was bigger than the mundane. But when it came to the next stage of the therapy, critical thinking - "to check out whether your assumptions stand up to examination" - I walked head first into a contradiction. If I think love's purpose is to make life worth living, but then say it's irrelevant to daily life, surely my two ideas of love are not compatible? As the cogs in my brain start to creak into motion, I feel myself taking a step back from my predicament: thinking about how I've been thinking. This idea I had of transcendental love might have started off as a romantic dream. But when the relationship stopped working, and I found myself feeling trapped and frustrated, I used it to justify the mechanics of a relationship that just didn't work in the daily grind. I used it to lie to myself. In the final stage, LeBon gets me to start thinking about how to go forward. "You can't change what has happened," he says. "You can't change that he's left you, or how you behaved in the relationship. So, as the Stoics did, let's work on controlling the controllables: the things that you can change." To work out what can be changed, he gets me to try out a thought experiment, a method often used in philosophy to imagine other worlds where people can have different codes of behaviour. Thought experiments shatter your preconceived ideas of how the world should be and let your imagination run wild to how the world could be. "I find Viktor Frankl very useful here, the Austrian psychiatrist and concentration-camp survivor who actually believed that everything in life happens for a purpose," LeBon says. "Suppose this break-up did happen for a reason that will work to your benefit," he suggests. "What might that be? The answer might be that you can now focus on something important that was denied in the relationship. Or - the Hollywood version - so you'll meet someone who is really right for you." Temporarily freed of any sense of responsibility for the relationship that was, and its sorry demise, the list came fast. I could now travel more; he didn't like me travelling on my own, but too often he didn't want to go anywhere, preferring to stay in his studio and make art. I'd love to meet someone with a similar sense of adventure to mine. For the first time in two years, I was being honest with myself about what I really wanted - listening to those voices that we all have inside our heads, and too often try to muzzle. So did philosophy save me? Well, I'm now dating a travel writer I have to run to keep up with. I still haven't got over the fact that my replacement came from Cleveland, Ohio. But I guess I never will. Tim LeBon can be reached by e-mail at [email protected] A FEW WORDS FROM THE WISE Compiled by Ed Caesar · "At the touch of love, everyone becomes a poet" - Plato · "There is always some madness in love. But there is also always some reason in madness" - Friedrich Nietzsche · "That man shall live as his own master and in happiness who can say each day 'I have lived'" - Horace · "The good of man is the active exercise of his soul's faculties in conformity with excellence or virtue... Moreover this activity must occupy a complete lifetime; for one swallow does not make spring, nor does one fine day; and similarly one day or a brief period of happiness does not make a man supremely blessed and happy" - Aristotle · "There is nothing on this earth more to be prized than friendship" - Thomas Aquinas · "Whatever you do... love those who love you" - Voltaire · "Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination" - Immanuel Kant · "Happiness is a state of which you are unconscious. The moment you are aware that you are happy, you cease to be happy" - Jiddu Krishnamurti · "Love is an ideal thing. Marriage is a real thing" - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe I shrink, therefore I am Therapy has many answers, but some questions require the help of a philosopher, says Clint Witchalls Sunday November 21, 2004 The Observer Danny had worked in the City of London for 10 years. As a research analyst, stockbroker and fund manager, he'd made a lot of valuable contacts, earnt a lot of cash, and learnt some important business skills. However, as he approached his mid-thirties, he no longer felt good about himself or what he did for a living, and he found his colleagues cold and unfriendly. A chronic illness made him realise his mortality, and he began to reassess his priorities. Danny had been struggling with his career conundrum for nearly five years when he met David Arnaud, a philosophical counsellor. After a few soul-searching sessions, Danny arrived at a decision. Today, he teaches economics to sixth-formers, and he loves it. 'It's a much better lifestyle,' he says. Many people are turning to philosophical counsellors to get answers to questions such as: 'How do I make sense of myself?' 'What is important to me?' 'Where am I going?' These are perhaps not the sort of questions that require psychiatric intervention, but Arnaud, who recently completed the first empirical study of philosophical counselling in the UK, has found that within just five sessions the majority of clients, with important decisions to make, tend to move from a state of concern and confusion to a resolution. Modern philosophical counselling can be traced back to 1981, when the philosopher Gerd Achenbach opened the first practice near Cologne. Achenbach referred to the new discipline as 'therapy for the sane.' Today, there are hundreds of philosophical counsellors around the world, with the movement particularly strong in the US, Britain and the Netherlands. 'The dilemmas people face aren't always primarily psychological,' says Alex Howard, a philosophical counsellor from Newcastle. 'If people face problems that are social or economic, it doesn't make sense to define their problems in purely psychological terms.' Tim LeBon, a founder member of the Society for Philosophy in Practice (SPP) and author of Wise Therapy, adds: 'We are faced with far more life choices than our grandparents, yet have far fewer resources to deal with them. Our grandparents may have gone to a priest or to other family members for advice; most people don't trust these solutions any more and so want to make their own well-informed, well thought-out choices. Philosophical counselling can help these people - people in mid-life crises who are wondering how to make the most of the rest of their life. People who want to take stock of their values.' Where stressed executives might once have been prescribed a course of tranquillisers or antidepressants, they can now get a dose of Bertrand Russell instead: 'Success is too dearly purchased if all the other ingredients have been sacrificed to obtain it.' While some philosophical counsellors do recommend books for their clients to read, most sessions are about helping the client identify faulty thoughts. For example, a briefing in Aristotelian logic might show a client why their beliefs are erroneous. The person might infer that they're a screw-up because they've screwed up. The counsellor could point out that they're making an error called 'fallacy of composition' - that is, what's true of the part isn't necessarily true of the whole. In philosophical counselling, problems aren't pathologised as they are by the psychiatric profession, and the dialogue between client and counsellor is more like a meeting of equals, compared to many therapies where the client is treated like a patient and seen as someone who is, in some way, inadequate. 'Anybody can benefit from philosophical counselling,' says Howard. 'But it does require someone who is willing to take stock.' Lou Marinoff, author of international bestseller Plato Not Prozac! has done much to promote philosophical counselling. 'Some people who have stabilised their neurochemistry and validated their emotions now wish to examine or re-examine the criteria of their beliefs, the principles of their conduct, or the meaning of their lives,' he says. 'With whom shall they do this? Psychologists and psychiatrists can shed light on such issues - as can rabbis, priests, imams and gurus. Philosophers are now rejoining the ranks of helpers.' LeBon believes certain therapies (such as cognitive behavioural therapy) don't go far enough in helping their clients. 'For instance, if you are anxious about your relationship, a cognitive therapist would try to dispute your catastrophising and jump to conclusions to make you feel less anxious,' says LeBon. 'A philosophical counsellor would do this, but would also look for existential meaning in your anxiety - perhaps you really don't want to be in the relationship and that is what your anxiety is telling you.' LeBon also gives short shrift to psychoanalysts. 'There's very little evidence for the Freudian unconscious, and it's time to move on to more intellectually satisfying and helpful therapies,' he says. However, Alain de Botton, the man who popularised philosophy as self-help, isn't ready to bury psychologists and their ilk just yet. 'The truth is that psychoanalysis grew out of philosophy - it's not some completely new idea, and in fact, done properly, psychoanalysis is philosophical anyway. It may even be dangerous to the mental health of some people to suggest a philosopher rather than a properly trained analyst. The knowledge of analysts when it comes to many emotional problems is now much greater than that of most philosophers.' Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004

What Do Existentialists Believe

I would ask the reader to perform similar thought experiments on other existential
fundamentals . Betrayal , love , sincerity , purpose , mourning , conviction ... Many
more will occur to reward the reader's interest . We are looking to appraise the ...

Author: Richard Appignanesi

Publisher: Granta Books

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 133

View: 650

Lively and provocative new introduction to Existentialism

Budhi

We don't love these objects for other reasons and then sadly watch them whither
or shatter or die ; rather we love them ... Imagine this flower in نعر In this , and in
the otherthought experiments ” to follow , I will be applying Husserl's method of
 ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Culture

Page:

View: 744


Midway

Another argument would allow us to admire but not to detest others , to love but
not to hate . But it is a pragmatic argument , no ... Even a strong dedication to bold
thought experiments cannot wholly remedy this fault . What helps more than ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 502


This is Not a Book

Philosophical Games and Thought Experiments to Give Your Mind a Workout
Michael Picard ... issue of the Other , and challenges us to take the perspective of
the Other , to understand others according to their needs . ... Care is as selfless
as any impartial utilitarian , but it is not impartial ; it is a personal and privileged
love .

Author: Michael Picard

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780760792568

Category: Philosophy

Page: 160

View: 908


Philosophy in Context

Russell might seem a fourth , but he lacked the originality of these other men , as
shown by the fact that his philosophy is little more ... attempting to transcend the
actual in order to survey possible alternatives , experiments ( other than thought
experiments ) are ruled out . ... better , best , love , memory , behavior , perception
, thought , thinking animal , mere animal , plant , atom , God , in order to articulate
 ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 924


Navel Gazing

wa Rediscovery of the Mind contains a typically lucid exposition of this view ,
among others . ' Mental events are ... I love the science - fiction flavour of these
various thought experiments that philosophers use . Did all the teenage sci - fi
addicts ...

Author: Peter Goldsworthy

Publisher: Penguin Group

ISBN:

Category: Literature

Page: 243

View: 670

Funny, wise, idiosyncratic and original, these occasional essays chart a course through the various genres of writing that Peter Goldsworthy has investigated- fiction, science fiction, poetry, opera and film. Spiced with often hilarious personal anecdotes and references to the wide-ranging reading of a self-confessed 'hick autodidact', Goldsworthy offers a book that is at once a writing manual for various literary disciplines, and a loose, extended exploration of his key themes and obsessions- death, humour, the limits of language, the relationship of biology to thought and culture, and the role and responsibilities of art. And first love also gets a look in . . . 'A rare intelligence, combining a scientific and poetic appreciation of life, each expressed with great elegance and love of language.' The Sunday Age

American Book Publishing Record

... on Nietzsche ' s Gay science – Trial balloon : Husserl to front weatherman #
414 - Testing your love , or , breaking up . ... 101 Theory of Philosophy COHEN ,
Martin , 1964101 Wittgenstein ' s beetle and other classic thought experiments ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 909


Wish bone

those times in the well , other times too . I trusted you ... I got a few more
experiments in mind . Not too nasty . ... And this maiden she lived with no other
thought than to love and be loved by me , ” he recited as she cried , “ Stop . Don ' t
do this to ...

Author: Marcia Golub

Publisher: Baskerville Pub

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 335

View: 110

When Mabel Fleish, the author of a provocative novel disappears after receiving threatening letters and phone calls from "Bones" the main character in her novel, a deranged detective, and an albino reporter team up to find her

The Naked Brain

How the Emerging Neurosociety is Changing how We Live, Work, and Love
Richard M. Restak ... Some of the chapters that follow will include descriptions of
their research ; other chapters will suggest thought experiments that you can
conduct ...

Author: Richard M. Restak

Publisher: Harmony

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 255

View: 199

In a study of the science of the human brain, the author examines how the latest research and developments in the field of social neuroscience are being used to influence and transform nearly every facet of modern life.

Subversive Thoughts Authentic Passions

Finding Love Without Losing Your Self Bonnie Kreps ... There are other ways of
conceiving a culture than on the basis of gender polarity , and it would behoove
us to start thinking of them . ... I offer two here , one cultural and one private , in
the mode of the Gedanken ( thought ) experiments made famous by modern
physics ...

Author: Bonnie Kreps

Publisher: Harpercollins

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 234

View: 136

This study reveals how women and men suffer from resulting gender-stereotyping and communication failures, and brings fresh understanding to real love

The Economist

But even if never instigated , it remains a useful " thought experiment ” , allowing
people to sort out the different reasons for their love of nature , the better to act on
them . For those who dislike thought experiments , though , here is a fairy tale .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Commerce

Page:

View: 258


Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education

Often people simply do thought experiments to figure out why something
happened . Thought experiments are frequently the best way to understand the
behavior of other people . ... Children love to draw and make up their own stories
.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Computer-assisted instruction

Page:

View: 239


What Sort of People Should There Be

And , less selfishly , we are glad to keep some thoughts about other people
secret so that we do not hurt them . But these ... As Fried puts it , Love or
friendship can be partially expressed by the gift of other rights – gifts of property
or of service . ... 4 . " The Right to Privacy ' , Harvard 64 THOUGHT
EXPERIMENTS Relationships.

Author: Jonathan Glover

Publisher: Penguin Group

ISBN:

Category: Behavior modification

Page: 189

View: 722

Poging tot inventarisatie van de ethische problematatiek, die kan ontstaan door medische ingrepen in de menselijke erfelijkheid en in de menselijke psyche.