My Grammar and I Or Should That Be Me

A runaway hit and Sunday Times bestseller, My Grammar and I has continued to grow in popularity, becoming the go-to guide for grammar.

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1843176262

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 908

A runaway hit and Sunday Times bestseller, My Grammar and I has continued to grow in popularity, becoming the go-to guide for grammar. My Grammar and I offers amusing examples of awful grammar, while steering you in the direction of grammatical greatness. Taking you on a tour of the English language through the minefield of rules and conditions that can catch you out, from dangling modifiers to split infinitives, it highlights the common pitfalls that every English language user faces on a day to day basis. Refreshing everything you should have learnt at school and more, My Grammar and I is informative yet entertaining - an ideal buy for any English language enthusiast.

My Grammar and I Or Should That Be Me

Clever and informative, this is the ideal gift for all English-language sticklers.

Author: J.A. Wines

Publisher: Readers Digest

ISBN: 9781606520260

Category: Reference

Page: 176

View: 626

Sharpen your language skills and navigate your way around grammatical minefields with this entertaining and practical guide. For anyone who has ever been stumped by dangling modifiers and split infinitives, or for those who have no idea what these things even are, My Grammar and I...Or Should That Be Me? offers practical and humorous guidance on how to avoid falling into language pitfalls. Here are all the right tools to help you gain confidence as a speaker and writer, highlighting the most common language errors, such as wrongly used prepositions, misplaced modifiers, and confusing participles. This refreshing refresher course covers: ? Spelling and Confusables-There are times when the spelling rule "i before e except after c" does not apply ? Parts of Speech-Is it "its" or "it's"? "Whose" or "who's"? ? Sentence Structure-Let us ponder the subject, or object, of "I" and "me" ? Punctuation-So where does a comma go? ? Elements of Style-There is more to grammar than knowing the difference between a subordinate object and a nonrestrictive apostrophe And, for those grammar know-it-alls, there are entertaining "Smart Aleck" trivia, anecdotes, witticisms, and more. Clever and informative, this is the ideal gift for all English-language sticklers.

500 Words You Should Know

Ever wanted to ameliorate your atavistic lexicon, engage in a little intellectual badinage or been discombobulated by tricky diction? 500 Words You Should Know has you covered.

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1782432981

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 265

View: 952

Ever wanted to ameliorate your atavistic lexicon, engage in a little intellectual badinage or been discombobulated by tricky diction? 500 Words You Should Know has you covered. Words are beautiful and versatile things, but when used incorrectly they can lose a lot in transition, and the more complex the word, the more misused it can become. And as words eternally evolve in their everyday use, they can begin to be interpreted as something other than their original meaning. 500 Words You Should Know will inspire the reader to use uncommon words in their correct context, to utilize the English language to its full potential, and to test themselves on the words they think they already know.

500 Beautiful Words You Should Know

With occasional special features on great words for colours, words from the Classics and words that make you laugh, this is a book to delight BIBLIOPHILES and BLATHERSKITES alike.

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 178929228X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 328

CRESTFALLEN at CHICANERY and CIRCUMLOCUTION? Have no TRUCK with TOMFOOLERY and TRUMPERY? Or OMNISCIENT about OBLOQUIES and OPSIMATHS? Whether you've answered yes, no or 'sorry, I didn't catch that', 500 Beautiful Words You Should Know is for you. It offers words that flow EXQUISITELY off the tongue; words that are just perfect for their meaning, like the lazy-sounding SLOTH and the heavy-footed GALUMPH; words that will make you sound clever, like DEUTERAGONIST and LETHOLOGICA; and words that are just fun to say, like LIQUEFACTION and LUXURIATE. It'll tell you where they come from, how to use them and whether you're likely to BAMBOOZLE anyone who's listening to you. With occasional special features on great words for colours, words from the Classics and words that make you laugh, this is a book to delight BIBLIOPHILES and BLATHERSKITES alike.

Grammar Secrets Collins Little Books

There, they’re or their? Who’s or whose? Me or I? Fewer or less? Inside this little book one of Britain’s top Grammar Gurus reveals all you need to know about Grammar but were afraid to ask.

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007591314

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 128

View: 778

Let’s admit it, we all struggle with Grammar. There, they’re or their? Who’s or whose? Me or I? Fewer or less? Inside this little book one of Britain’s top Grammar Gurus reveals all you need to know about Grammar but were afraid to ask.

Misadventures in the English Language

Looking at why it pays to be precise in your punctuation - the hackneyed examples of 'Let's eat Grandma' and 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' show how a comma can make all the difference - why tautologies are simply annoying; how corporate speak ...

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1782436499

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 451

Misadventures in the English Language looks at some of the controversial aspects of English usage - grammar, vocabulary and punctuation - and tries to assess what matters and what doesn't. Looking at why it pays to be precise in your punctuation - the hackneyed examples of 'Let's eat Grandma' and 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' show how a comma can make all the difference - why tautologies are simply annoying; how corporate speak can actually mean nothing at all; and why naughty, awful, sophisticated and virtue are all words that have evolved to mean something completely different, this book covers all the aspects of the English language that could leave you with cause for concern. It also considers where we are now, appraising (and often praising) the invention of new words - from kidult to piscetarian - including internet-led abbreviations such as JK and IMHO. By turns an explanation of the rules, a rant against gobbledygook and other modern horrors, this book will aid you in avoiding embarrassing clichés and jargon, and help you put your words in the right places, finally enabling you to revel in the richness of the English language. Reviews for New Words for Old: 'Pleasantly diverting' Guardian 'Fascinating ... perfect for anyone obsessed by wordplay' Yours magazine

An Apple A Day

In An Apple A Day Caroline Taggart explores the truth behind our favourite proverbs, their history and whether they offer any genuine help to the recipient. Did you know that The Old Testament has an entire book devoted to proverbs?

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1843176521

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 266

Does absence really make the heart grow fonder? Can beggars be choosers? Is it always better late than never? Proverbs are short, well-known, pithy sayings that offer advice or words of encouragement and are used in everyday English without much thought ever being given to their meanings, or indeed, usefulness. In An Apple A Day Caroline Taggart explores the truth behind our favourite proverbs, their history and whether they offer any genuine help to the recipient. Did you know that The Old Testament has an entire book devoted to proverbs? Or that 'a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush' is a proverb from falconry that dates back to the Middle Ages? Many proverbs are still in use today, including the very famous 'slow and steady wins the race', which derives from one of the many fables of Aesop. Lighthearted but authoritative, An Apple A Day proves that proverbs are as useful today as they ever were.

Back to Basics

In Back to Basics, bestselling author Caroline Taggart will provide readers with the opportunity to learn really useful stuff that was never taught in mainstream education, while also giving a refresher course on the main staples.

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1843179008

Category: Mathematics

Page: 192

View: 879

Don't know Midas from Oedipus? Wouldn't recognize a concerto from a sonata? Many of us wish that we could fill in the gaps in our education in order to avoid those embarrassing situations when we feel as if we don't know things that others do. In Back to Basics, bestselling author Caroline Taggart will provide readers with the opportunity to learn really useful stuff that was never taught in mainstream education, while also giving a refresher course on the main staples. From brushing up on Bible stories and classical architecture, to identifying different types of clouds, your thirst for knowledge will be sated and your education complete - and it's enormous fun to boot!

The Accidental Apostrophe

Sunday Times bestselling author Caroline Taggart brings her usual gently humorous approach to punctuation, pointing out what really matters and what doesn't.

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1782438211

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 189

View: 322

Sunday Times bestselling author Caroline Taggart brings her usual gently humorous approach to punctuation, pointing out what really matters and what doesn't. In Roman times, blocks of text were commonly written just as blocks without even wordspacingnevermindpunctuation to help the reader to interpret them. Orators using such texts as notes for a speech would prepare carefully so that they were familiar with the content and didn't come a cropper over a confusion between, say, therapists and the rapists. As we entered the Christian era and sacred texts were widely read (by priests if not by the rest of us), it became ever more important to remove any likelihood of misinterpretation. To a potential murderer or adulterer, for example, there is a world of difference between 'If you are tempted, yield not, resisting the urge to commit a sin' and 'If you are tempted, yield, not resisting the urge to commit a sin'. And the only surface difference is the positioning of a comma. So yes, you SMS-addicts and 'let it all hang out' Sixties children, punctuation does matter. And, contrary to what people who tear their hair out over apostrophes believe, it is there to help - to clarify meaning, to convey emphasis, to indicate that you are asking a question or quoting someone else's words. It also comes in handy for telling your reader when to pause for breath. Caroline Taggart, who has made a name for herself expounding on the subjects of grammar, usage and words generally (and who for decades made her living putting in the commas in other people's work), takes her usual gently humorous approach to punctuation. She points out what matters and what doesn't; why using six exclamation marks where one will do is perfectly OK in a text but will lose you marks at school; why hang glider pilots in training really need a hyphen; and how throwing in the odd semicolon will impress your friends. Sometimes opinionated but never dogmatic, she is an ideal guide to the (perceived) minefield that is punctuation. By the same author: 9781843176572 My Grammar and I (Or Should That Be 'Me'?) 9781782432944 500 Words you Should Know

New Words for Old

Tracing the development of green from the days when it was just a colour, web when it was something spiders made and trolls when they were nothing more threatening than the baddies in fairy tales, this is a fascinating tour through the ...

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 9781782434726

Category:

Page: 192

View: 542

The English language is a versatile and agile thing, and as our world changes, so too does the way we use it. Aspirin, television, selfie--there was a time when these creations didn't exist, but rather than coin a completely new word to describe them, we often adopt and adapt existing words to suit new purposes, or simply put two together to form a third. New Words for Old looks at the story behind the words we use every day and how their meanings have changed over time. From technology and fashion to politics and music, our language displays centuries of imagination and creativity, so often overlooked. Tracing the development of green from the days when it was just a color, web when it was something spiders made and trolls when they were nothing more threatening than the baddies in fairy tales, this is a fascinating tour through the history of the words we use every day and demonstrates just how wide we cast the net when trying to describe something new.