The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition

These are: (1) consumers' demands and aspirations vis-à-vis automobiles; (2) flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); (3) rapidly evolving technology; and (4) the internationalization of the automotive industry. [exec. summary]

Author: Robert E. Cole

Publisher: U of M Center for Japanese Studies

ISBN: 0939512289

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 249

View: 253

This report was prepared for the Policy Board by the U.S. and Japanese research staffs of the Joint U.S.-Japan Automotive Study under the general direction of Professors Paul W. McCracken and Keichi Oshima, with research operations organized and coordinated by Robert E. Cole on the U.S. side, in close communication with the Taizo Yakushiji on the Japanese side. [preface]In view of the importance of stable, long-term economic relationships between Japan and the United States, automotive issues have to be dealt with in ways consistent with the joint prosperity of both countries. Furthermore, the current economic friction has the potential to adversely affect future political relationships. Indeed, under conditions of economic stagnation, major economic issues inevitably become political issues.With these considerations in mind, the Joint U.S.-Japan Automotive Study project was started in September 1981 to determine the conditions that will allow for the prosperous coexistence of the respective automobile industries. During this two-year study, we have identified four driving forces that will play a major role in determining the future course of the automotive industry of both countries. These are: (1) consumers' demands and aspirations vis-à-vis automobiles; (2) flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); (3) rapidly evolving technology; and (4) the internationalization of the automotive industry. [exec. summary]

The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition

These are: (1) consumers' demands and aspirations vis-à-vis automobiles; (2) flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); (3) rapidly evolving technology; and (4) the internationalization of the automotive industry. [exec. summary].

Author: Robert E. Cole

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 251

View: 743

This report was prepared for the Policy Board by the U.S. and Japanese research staffs of the Joint U.S.-Japan Automotive Study under the general direction of Professors Paul W. McCracken and Keichi Oshima, with research operations organized and coordinated by Robert E. Cole on the U.S. side, in close communication with the Taizo Yakushiji on the Japanese side. [preface] In view of the importance of stable, long-term economic relationships between Japan and the United States, automotive issues have to be dealt with in ways consistent with the joint prosperity of both countries. Furthermore, the current economic friction has the potential to adversely affect future political relationships. Indeed, under conditions of economic stagnation, major economic issues inevitably become political issues. With these considerations in mind, the Joint U.S.-Japan Automotive Study project was started in September 1981 to determine the conditions that will allow for the prosperous coexistence of the respective automobile industries. During this two-year study, we have identified four driving forces that will play a major role in determining the future course of the automotive industry of both countries. These are: (1) consumers' demands and aspirations vis-à-vis automobiles; (2) flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); (3) rapidly evolving technology; and (4) the internationalization of the automotive industry. [exec. summary].

The Future of U S Manufacturing

Work , Mobility and Participation : a Comparative Study of American and Japanese Industry , Berkeley , University of California Press Cole , R. E. and Yakushiji , T. 1984. The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition ...

Author: United States. Congress. Joint Economic Committee

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 112

View: 651


The North American Auto Industry at the Onset of Continental Free Trade Negotiations

The Future of the Automobile : the Report of MIT's International Motor Vehicle Program . Cambridge : MIT Press . ... The Mexican Auto Industry : A Competitor for the 1990s . ... The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition .

Author: Stephen Herzenberg

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 114

View: 661


Japanese Industrial Targeting

Chang, C. S., The Japanese Auto Industry and the US Market, New York: Praeger Publishing Co., 1981. ... Cole, Robert E., and Taizo Yakushiji, eds, The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition, Tokyo: Technova, Inc., 1984.

Author: William R. Nester

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1349212849

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 297

View: 714

Japan achieved it's present economic position by rejecting free trade theory and instead mastering neomercantilist policies which target strategic industries for development with a range of government sponsored cartels, subsidies, import barriers and export incentives. These policies stimulated an economic growth rate which averaged ten percent before 1973, and five percent since, rates four and two times greater than America's during the same periods. This book analyzes the policy making process, implementation, successes, occasional shortcomings, and challenges posed by Tokyo's neomercantilist policies toward its trade rivals.

Fairness and Division of Labor in Market Societies

Comparison of U.S. and German Automotive Industries Hyeong-Ki Kwon ... “The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition,” report of the Joint US-Japan Automotive Study (Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, University of ...

Author: Hyeong-Ki Kwon

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1789205816

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 986

Contrary to the explanations offered by the theory of non-reflexive, path-dependent institutionalism, the U.S. and the German automotive industries undertook strikingly similar patterns of industry modification under tough international competition during the 1990s, departing from their traditional national patterns. By investigating the processes of the U.S. and German adjustments, the author critically reconsiders the prevalent paradigms of political economy and comes to the conclusion that the evidence does not confirm the neoliberal paradigm. In order to better account for the recomposition of new market relations, which the author terms "converging but non-liberal" and "diverging but not predetermined" markets, he proposes an alternative model of "politics among reflexive agents," emphasizing different kinds of problem-solving practices among those reflexive agents. He argues that different forms and regimes of market are established in the process of recomposition, in which agents reflect upon not only market rationality but also upon their own institutions, creating new norms.

Information Incentives and Bargaining in the Japanese Economy

According to a study of the U.S. and Japanese automobile industry by Robert Cole and Taizo Yakushiji , the lead ... The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition , Center for Japanese Studies , University of Michigan , 1984.

Author: Masahiko Aoki

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521386814

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 607

An in-depth analysis of conventional notions for basic characteristics of the Japanese market economy's microstructure that have significantly influenced economists' approaches to industrial organization.

Strategic Capitalism

Private Business and Public Purpose in Japanese Industrial Finance Kent E. Calder ... See John Campbell in Cole and Yakushiji , eds . , The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition , 86–88 . 6. Cusumano , The Japanese ...

Author: Kent E. Calder

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691225176

Category: Political Science

Page: 395

View: 191

Was Japan's economic miracle generated primarily by the Japanese state or by the nation's dynamic private sector? In addressing this question, Kent Calder's richly detailed study offers a distinctive reinterpretation of Japanese government-business relations. Calder challenges popular opinion to demonstrate how Japanese private enterprise has complemented the state in achieving the national purpose of industrial transformation.

United States Japan Economic Relations

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF U.S. INDUSTRY Increasingly , the perception , if not the reality , is that the Japanese are trying to take advantage of this transition period in the American industry by producing more cars than ever before for ...

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Japan

Page: 337

View: 707


The Effect of Expanding Japanese Automobile Imports on the Domestic Economy

AMERICAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY TRANSITION The American automotive industry is today in the midst of a dramatic transition . Its success in making this transition is important both to the industry itself and to the American economy ...

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. Subcommittee on Economic Stabilization

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 114

View: 442