The Rape Of Nanking

In this seminal work, Iris Chang, whose own grandparents barely escaped the massacre, tells this history from three perspectives: that of the Japanese soldiers, that of the Chinese, and that of a group of Westerners who refused to abandon ...

Author: Iris Chang

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 046502825X

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 503

The New York Times bestselling account of one of history's most brutal -- and forgotten -- massacres, when the Japanese army destroyed China's capital city on the eve of World War II In December 1937, one of the most horrific atrocities in the long annals of wartime barbarity occurred. The Japanese army swept into the ancient city of Nanking (what was then the capital of China), and within weeks, more than 300,000 Chinese civilians and soldiers were systematically raped, tortured, and murdered. In this seminal work, Iris Chang, whose own grandparents barely escaped the massacre, tells this history from three perspectives: that of the Japanese soldiers, that of the Chinese, and that of a group of Westerners who refused to abandon the city and created a safety zone, which saved almost 300,000 Chinese. Drawing on extensive interviews with survivors and documents brought to light for the first time, Iris Chang's classic book is the definitive history of this horrifying episode. "Chang vividly, methodically, records what happened, piecing together the abundant eyewitness reports into an undeniable tapestry of horror." - Adam Hochschild, Salon

The Making of the Rape of Nanking

In The Making of the "Rape of Nanking Takashi Yoshida examines how views of the Nanjing Massacre have evolved in history writing and public memory in Japan, China, and the United States.

Author: Takashi Yoshida

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199724822

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 848

On December 13, 1937, the Japanese army attacked and captured the Chinese capital city of Nanjing, planting the rising-sun flag atop the city's outer walls. What occurred in the ensuing weeks and months has been the source of a tempestuous debate ever since. It is well known that the Japanese military committed wholesale atrocities after the fall of the city, massacring large numbers of Chinese during the both the Battle of Nanjing and in its aftermath. Yet the exact details of the war crimes--how many people were killed during the battle? How many after? How many women were raped? Were prisoners executed? How unspeakable were the acts committed?--are the source of controversy among Japanese, Chinese, and American historians to this day. In The Making of the "Rape of Nanking Takashi Yoshida examines how views of the Nanjing Massacre have evolved in history writing and public memory in Japan, China, and the United States. For these nations, the question of how to treat the legacy of Nanjing--whether to deplore it, sanitize it, rationalize it, or even ignore it--has aroused passions revolving around ethics, nationality, and historical identity. Drawing on a rich analysis of Chinese, Japanese, and American history textbooks and newspapers, Yoshida traces the evolving--and often conflicting--understandings of the Nanjing Massacre, revealing how changing social and political environments have influenced the debate. Yoshida suggests that, from the 1970s on, the dispute over Nanjing has become more lively, more globalized, and immeasurably more intense, due in part to Japanese revisionist history and a renewed emphasis on patriotic education in China. While today it is easy to assume that the Nanjing Massacre has always been viewed as an emblem of Japan's wartime aggression in China, the image of the "Rape of Nanking" is a much more recent icon in public consciousness. Takashi Yoshida analyzes the process by which the Nanjing Massacre has become an international symbol, and provides a fair and respectful treatment of the politically charged and controversial debate over its history.

Documents on the Rape of Nanking

Newly revised resources for understanding the Rape of Nanking

Author: Timothy Brook

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472086627

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 939

Newly revised resources for understanding the Rape of Nanking

The Rape of Nanking

The Rape of Nanking tells the story from three perspectives: of the Japanese soldiers who performed it, of the Chinese civilians who endured it, and of a group of Europeans and Americans who refused to abandon the city and were able to ...

Author: Iris Chang

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780141007885

Category: Nan-ching shih (China)

Page: 290

View: 205

In December 1937, the Japanese army swept into the ancient city of Nanking. Within weeks, more than 300,000 Chinese civilians and soldiers were systematically raped, tortured, and murdered--a death toll exceeding that of the atomic blasts of Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined. Using extensive interviews with survivors and newly discovered documents, Iris Chang has written the definitive history of this horrifying episode.

American Goddess at the Rape of Nanking

"Hua-ling Hu presents here the amazing untold story of the American missionary Minnie Vautrin, whose unswerving defiance of the Japanese protected ten thousand Chinese women and children and made her a legend among the Chinese people she ...

Author: Hua-ling Hu

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809323036

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 184

View: 956

"Hua-ling Hu presents here the amazing untold story of the American missionary Minnie Vautrin, whose unswerving defiance of the Japanese protected ten thousand Chinese women and children and made her a legend among the Chinese people she served."--Jacket.

American Goddess at the Rape of Nanking

Hua-ling Hu presents here the amazing untold story of the American missionary Minnie Vautrin, whose unswerving defiance of the Japanese protected ten thousand Chinese women and children and made her a legend among the Chinese people she ...

Author: Hua-ling Hu

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809323869

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 184

View: 947

The Japanese army’s brutal four-month occupation of the city of Nanking during the 1937 Sino-Japanese War is known, for good reason, as “the rape of Nanking.” As they slaughtered an estimated three hundred thousand people, the invading soldiers raped more than twenty thousand women—some estimates run as high as eighty thousand. Hua-ling Hu presents here the amazing untold story of the American missionary Minnie Vautrin, whose unswerving defiance of the Japanese protected ten thousand Chinese women and children and made her a legend among the Chinese people she served. Vautrin, who came to be known in China as the “Living Goddess” or the “Goddess of Mercy,” joined the Foreign Christian Missionary Society and went to China during the Chinese Nationalist Revolution in 1912. As dean of studies at Ginling College in Nanking, she devoted her life to promoting Chinese women’s education and to helping the poor. At the outbreak of the war in July 1937, Vautrin defied the American embassy’s order to evacuate the city. After the fall of Nanking in December, Japanese soldiers went on a rampage of killing, burning, looting, rape, and torture, rapidly reducing the city to a hell on earth. On the fourth day of the occupation, Minnie Vautrin wrote in her diary: “There probably is no crime that has not been committed in this city today. . . . Oh, God, control the cruel beastliness of the soldiers in Nanking.” When the Japanese soldiers ordered Vautrin to leave the campus, she replied: “This is my home. I cannot leave.” Facing down the blood-stained bayonets constantly waved in her face, Vautrin shielded the desperate Chinese who sought asylum behind the gates of the college. Vautrin exhausted herself defying the Japanese army and caring for the refugees after the siege ended in March 1938. She even helped the women locate husbands and sons who had been taken away by the Japanese soldiers. She taught destitute widows the skills required to make a meager living and provided the best education her limited sources would allow to the children in desecrated Nanking. Finally suffering a nervous breakdown in 1940, Vautrin returned to the United States for medical treatment. One year later, she ended her own life. She considered herself a failure. Hu bases her biography on Vautrin’s correspondence between 1919 and 1941 and on her diary, maintained during the entire siege, as well as on Chinese, Japanese, and American eyewitness accounts, government documents, and interviews with Vautrin’s family.

The Rape of Nanking

Author: James Yin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page: 319

View: 512


Making of The Rape of Nanking

How could anyone who actually read the book endorse or give glowing reviews of a book full of forged evidence and contradictions? Is it possible that missionaries lied under oath?

Author: Akira Kashima

Publisher: ISBN Canada

ISBN: 9781777454401

Category:

Page: 114

View: 855

The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War ll by Iris Chang, first published in 1997 and made into many Hollywood type movies, seems to have played an important role in planting the images of Japanese brutality and cruelty during World War ll in public mind in the West. It is shocking however, to discover NO FACTUAL BASIS FOR THE ALLEGED MASSACRE OR MASS RAPE of Nanking(Nanjing) citizens in 1937-1938 during Sino-Japanese War, so vividly described in The Rape of Nanking. Even more astonishing is that The Rape of Nanking is highly acclaimed as a history book, often referenced in other history books and public discourses by some well-regarded people in the field including some Holocaust scholars. How could anyone who actually read the book endorse or give glowing reviews of a book full of forged evidence and contradictions? Is it possible that missionaries lied under oath? This short study exposes some of the many lies told in The Rape of Nanking from five key perspectives. We hope to help the readers to gain insight into how narratives might have been created and propagated to serve their political purposes during the war and beyond.

The Rape of Nanking

I used to do some pretty brutal things." - Kodaira Yoshio, former Japanese soldier (Honda, 2015, 122). "This is the shortest day of the year, but it still contains twenty-four hours of this hell on earth.

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781542753371

Category:

Page: 54

View: 389

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the massacre by civilians and Japanese soldiers *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "When you're talking about the Japanese military, thievery and rape just come with the territory. We stabbed them with bayonets, cut open pregnant women and took out the child. I killed five or six of them myself. I used to do some pretty brutal things." - Kodaira Yoshio, former Japanese soldier (Honda, 2015, 122). "This is the shortest day of the year, but it still contains twenty-four hours of this hell on earth." - Dr. Robert Wilson, diary entry in Nanking, December 21st, 1937 (Brook, 1999, 219). Three days of plundering traditionally befell cities taken by storm, a fate usually avoided by those surrendering before the first attacking soldier penetrated beyond the outer walls. In Europe and areas influenced by Enlightenment thinkers, this practice faded rapidly after the Napoleonic Wars. In 1937, however, as the Imperial Army of Japan invaded China, this custom returned in a horrifying new form - the Rape of Nanking or the Nanking Massacre, a bloodbath lasting more than six weeks and possibly claiming more than a quarter of a million lives. Even the Japanese participating in the Nanking Massacre provided no rationale for their actions. They made no effort to explain it as a measure to terrorize other Chinese cities into surrender, or even to extract the location of hidden valuables. Instead, the Rape appears on the page of history as a psychopathic orgy of sadism for sadism's sake. Insatiably driven by hatred and, apparently, an unabashed relish for cruelty, the Japanese soldiery abandoned any semblance of restraint. Women of every age, from small children to ancient elders, suffered innumerable rapes, in many cases dying from the mass raping alone. Those who did not die from sexual assault suffered death in other forms - shot, decapitated, or tortured to death once the soldiers found themselves sexually exhausted. Other women suffered fatal sexual torture involving the introduction of sharp foreign objects into their vagina or the placement of firecrackers or live grenades inside. At least one soldier, Kodaira Yoshio, so enjoyed torturing women to death that he returned to Japan as a serial killer, treating his Japanese victims in the same fashion as Chinese women until caught and executed. The Japanese hacked men to death, shot them, used them for live bayonet practice, drowned them, locked them in sheds and burned them, or buried them alive. Even farm animals suffered mutilation, shooting, or burning while locked in their barns. Unburied corpses lay in heaps everywhere, while the Japanese continued to harry and slaughter the survivors for week after week. A choking stench hung over the city in the summer heat. A number of foreign people on the scene attempted to save some of the Chinese from the massacre and, in some cases, succeeded. Their neutral status gave them the ability to move around Nanking without - in most cases - suffering assault or murder by the swarms of Japanese troops glutting themselves endlessly on human pain and death. They also photographed the nearly inconceivable images of bloodshed, creating a stark, permanent record of one of World War II's leading atrocities. Even Third Reich personnel in the city interceded in a sometimes futile effort to rescue victims from their tormentors. At the end of the city's long harrowing, the world knew clearly, if it did not before, that the Japanese of Tojo and Hirohito showed a very different spirit than the exquisitely genteel and chivalric men of the Russo-Japanese War of 1905. The fight against Imperial Japan represented not merely an effort to avoid being conquered, but for survival itself. The Rape of Nanking: The History and Legacy of the Notorious Massacre during the Second Sino-Japanese War chronicles one of the most infamous events of the 20th century.

The Nanking Atrocity 1937 38

This volume seeks to debunk the myths promoted by scholars on both sides of the argument & present a revisionist view of the atrocity that complicates the picture.

Author: Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845451806

Category: Social Science

Page: 433

View: 650

Events in Nanking during 1937-38 are the subject of a ferocious historiographical debate between Chinese & Japanese points of view. This volume seeks to debunk the myths promoted by scholars on both sides of the argument & present a revisionist view of the atrocity that complicates the picture.

The Secret Behind the Rape of Nanking

Due to the book, the term "Nanking Massacre" has recently resurfaced and spread rapidly throughout the world, starting with the United States.

Author: Ryuho Okawa

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781941779248

Category:

Page:

View: 240


The Nanking Atrocity 1937 1938

This second edition includes an extensive new introduction by the editor reflecting on the historiographical developments of the last decade, in advance of the 80th anniversary of the massacre.

Author: Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785335979

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 906

First published in 2007, The Nanking Atrocity remains an essential resource for understanding the massacre committed by Japanese soldiers in Nanking, China during the winter of 1937-38. Through a series of deeply considered and empirically rigorous essays, it provides a far more complex and nuanced perspective than that found in works like Iris Chang’s bestselling The Rape of Nanking. It systematically reveals the flaws and exaggerations in Chang’s book while deflating the self-exculpatory narratives that persist in Japan even today. This second edition includes an extensive new introduction by the editor reflecting on the historiographical developments of the last decade, in advance of the 80th anniversary of the massacre.

The Woman Who Could Not Forget Iris Chang Before and Beyond The Rape of Nanking

The poignant story of the life and death of world-famous author and historian Iris Chang, as told by her mother. Iris Chang's bestselling book, The Rape of Nanking, forever changed the way we view the Second World War in Asia.

Author: Ying-Ying Chang

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1605986658

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 456

View: 290

The poignant story of the life and death of world-famous author and historian Iris Chang, as told by her mother. Iris Chang's best-selling book The Rape of Nanking forever changed the way we view the Second World War in Asia. It all began with a photo of a river choked with the bodies of hundreds of Chinese civilians that shook Iris to her core. Who were these people? Why had this happened and how could their story have been lost to history? She could not shake that image from her head. She could not forget what she had seen. A few short years later, Chang revealed this "second Holocaust" to the world. The Japanese atrocities against the people of Nanking were so extreme that a Nazi party leader based in China actually petitioned Hitler to ask the Japanese government to stop the massacre. But who was this woman that single-handedly swept away years of silence, secrecy and shame? Her mother, Ying-Ying, provides an enlightened and nuanced look at her daughter, from Iris' home-made childhood newspaper, to her early years as a journalist and later, as a promising young historian, her struggles with her son's autism and her tragic suicide. The Woman Who Could Not Forget cements Iris' legacy as one of the most extraordinary minds of her generation and reveals the depth and beauty of the bond between a mother and daughter.

Nanking

Drawing on English, Chinese, and Japanese sources, this study challenges the prevailing view that the Rape of Nanking was a deliberate, planned effort on the part of the Japanese military and concludes that it was instead an unfortunate ...

Author: Masahiro Yamamoto

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275969042

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 510

Drawing on English, Chinese, and Japanese sources, this study challenges the prevailing view that the Rape of Nanking was a deliberate, planned effort on the part of the Japanese military and concludes that it was instead an unfortunate tragedy of conventional warfare.

The Secret Behind the Rape of Nanking

Due to the book, the term "Nanking Massacre" has recently resurfaced and spread rapidly throughout the world, starting with the United States.

Author: Ryuho Okawa

Publisher: Irh PressCo Limited

ISBN: 9781941779088

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 891


The Making of the Rape of Nanking History and Memory in Japan China and the United States

Daqing Yang's “Convergence or Divergence? Recent Historical Writings on the
Rape of Nanjing” (1999) enlightened readers as to recent Japanese and
Chinese scholarship on Nanjing.64 Timothy Brook's Documents on the Rape of
Nanking ...

Author: Takashi Yoshida Assistant Professor of History Western Michigan University

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195346211

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 985

On December 13, 1937, the Japanese army attacked and captured the Chinese capital city of Nanjing, planting the rising-sun flag atop the city's outer walls. What occurred in the ensuing weeks and months has been the source of a tempestuous debate ever since. It is well known that the Japanese military committed wholesale atrocities after the fall of the city, massacring large numbers of Chinese during the both the Battle of Nanjing and in its aftermath. Yet the exact details of the war crimes--how many people were killed during the battle? How many after? How many women were raped? Were prisoners executed? How unspeakable were the acts committed?--are the source of controversy among Japanese, Chinese, and American historians to this day. In The Making of the "Rape of Nanking" Takashi Yoshida examines how views of the Nanjing Massacre have evolved in history writing and public memory in Japan, China, and the United States. For these nations, the question of how to treat the legacy of Nanjing--whether to deplore it, sanitize it, rationalize it, or even ignore it--has aroused passions revolving around ethics, nationality, and historical identity. Drawing on a rich analysis of Chinese, Japanese, and American history textbooks and newspapers, Yoshida traces the evolving--and often conflicting--understandings of the Nanjing Massacre, revealing how changing social and political environments have influenced the debate. Yoshida suggests that, from the 1970s on, the dispute over Nanjing has become more lively, more globalized, and immeasurably more intense, due in part to Japanese revisionist history and a renewed emphasis on patriotic education in China. While today it is easy to assume that the Nanjing Massacre has always been viewed as an emblem of Japan's wartime aggression in China, the image of the "Rape of Nanking" is a much more recent icon in public consciousness. Takashi Yoshida analyzes the process by which the Nanjing Massacre has become an international symbol, and provides a fair and respectful treatment of the politically charged and controversial debate over its history.

Battle of Shanghai

The Japanese would be forced into close combat urban warfare, which is similar to the rat warfare between the Germans and Russians during the Battle of Stalingrad five years later, allowing many historians to name the Battle of Shanghai as ...

Author: Luke Diep-Nguyen

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781947766310

Category:

Page:

View: 644

Shanghai, known as the Pearl of the Orient, had always been an international center in China was near-total destruction during the Sino-Japanese War. Following the Marco Polo Bridge Incident in 1937, the Japanese headed for its goal, the capital of China, Nanking. Shanghai was a key battleground before they were able to reach the capital of China, which brought on the "Stalingrad on the Yangtze." As a leader of the Nationalist Government, Chiang Kai-Shek would lead the Kuomintang ("KMT") Army into preparing the city to repel the oncoming smaller, yet technologically superior and more experienced Kwantung Army under the combat-experienced and graduate of Japan's elite war college, General Iwane Matsui. Initially, the Imperial Japanese Army had estimated the battle to be over within three days due to their military superiority. However, the Japanese would become engaged in three months, one month, and six days with KMT's best-trained divisions in one of the largest and bloodiest battles of the Sino-Japanese War. The Japanese would be forced into close combat urban warfare, which is similar to the rat warfare between the Germans and Russians during the Battle of Stalingrad five years later, allowing many historians to name the Battle of Shanghai as "the Stalingrad of the Yangtze." Special Japanese forces also used chemical weapons against the entrenched KMT soldiers. Only after the KMT military had run entirely out of ammunition, food, and water, were they forced to surrender or flee from the city which had been turned from a populated metropolitan town to a city of rubble and ashes. The city of Shanghai also housed a large Jewish refugee population and foreign settlement, which housed mostly Americans and British civilians. During the battle, many lost their homes and were forced to be squeezed into small districts. After the battle, many foreigners chose to stay and live among the Japanese as the Japanese also used their communities as their military bases or headquarters. Due to the neutrality between Japan and the Western nations, the foreign communities did not face the same punishments as the Chinese who were forced to remain in Shanghai.

Asian American Literature

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 9781230527901

Category:

Page: 24

View: 182

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 23. Chapters: The Rape of Nanking, Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat, University of Hawaii Press, List of Asian American writers, Chinese American literature, Aiiieeeee! An Anthology of Asian-American Writers, When Heaven and Earth Changed Places, Asian/Pacific American Awards for Literature, On Gold Mountain, The Accidental Asian, The Eighth Promise, No Name Woman, Kundiman, Asian American Literary Awards, Bamboo Among the Oaks, Woman With Horns, Manoa, Asian American Writers' Workshop, The White House Doctor, Finding Iris Chang, University of Washington Press, Temple University Press, Days and Nights in Calcutta. Excerpt: The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II is a bestselling 1997 non-fiction book written by Iris Chang about the 1937-1938 Nanking Massacre, the massacre and atrocities committed by the Imperial Japanese Army after it captured Nanjing, then capital of China, during the Second Sino-Japanese War. It documents the events, based on the author's research, leading up to the Nanking Massacre and the atrocities that were committed. The book also presents the view that the Japanese government has not done enough to redress the atrocities. It is one of the first major English-language books to introduce the Nanking Massacre to Western and Eastern readers alike, and has been translated into several languages. The book was a source of fame for Chang but was also controversial; it has been praised as a work which "shows more clearly than any previous account" the extent and brutality of the episode, while at the same time it was criticised as "seriously flawed" and "full of misinformation and harebrained explanations." It was received with both acclaim and criticism by the public and by academics. Chang's research on the book was credited with the finding of the diaries of John Rabe and Minnie Vautrin, ...

The Japanese Invasion of Manchuria and the Rape of Nanking

Even Third Reich personnel in the city interceded in a sometimes futile effort to rescue victims from their tormentors. This book chronicles two of the most infamous events of the 20th century.

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781535344111

Category:

Page: 94

View: 818

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the events written by people on both sides *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Though scarcely mentioned in the world of early 21st century politics, Manchuria represented a key region of Asia during the first half of the 20th century. Once the heartland of the fierce Manchu empire, this northeastern Chinese region's rich natural resources made it a prize for nations in the process of entering the modern age, and three ambitious nations in the midst of such a transformation lay close enough to Manchuria to attempt to claim it: Japan, Russia, and China. For countries attempting to shake off their feudal past and enter a dynamic era of industrialization, Manchuria's resources presented an irresistible lure. With immense natural resources coupled to economic activity more concentrated than elsewhere in China, this region, abutting Mongolia, Korea, the Yellow Sea, and the Great Wall "accounted for 90 percent of China's oil, 70 percent of its iron, 55 percent of its gold, and 33 percent of its trade. If Shanghai remained China's commercial center, by 1931 Manchuria had become its industrial center." (Paine, 2012, 15). Thus, it's not altogether surprising that Japan's invasion of Manchuria in 1931 resulted from a long, complex chain of historical events stretching back to the late 19th century. Approximately 380,000 square miles in extent, or 1.4 times the size of the American state of Texas, Manchuria came into Imperial Russia's possession in 1900 due to the "Boxer Rebellion" in China, but the Russians held it only briefly; their defeat in the Russo-Japanese War shook loose their control from important parts of Manchuria by the end of 1905. The Japanese gained two important footholds in Manchuria thanks to their victory. One consisted of Port Arthur (renamed Ryojun by the Japanese), an economically and strategically vital harbor city on the Liaodung Peninsula, plus the peninsula itself. The other comprised the South Manchurian Railway, which the Russians gave to the Japanese as a prize of war, in lieu of a cash indemnity. Three days of plundering traditionally befell cities taken by storm, a fate usually avoided by those surrendering before the first attacking soldier penetrated beyond the outer walls. In Europe and areas influenced by Enlightenment thinkers, this practice faded rapidly after the Napoleonic Wars. In 1937, however, as the Imperial Army of Japan invaded China, this custom returned in a horrifying new form - the Rape of Nanking or the Nanking Massacre, a bloodbath lasting more than six weeks and possibly claiming more than a quarter of a million lives. Even the Japanese participating in the Nanking Massacre provided no rationale for their actions. They made no effort to explain it as a measure to terrorize other Chinese cities into surrender, or even to extract the location of hidden valuables. Instead, the Rape appears on the page of history as a psychopathic orgy of sadism for sadism's sake. Insatiably driven by hatred and, apparently, an unabashed relish for cruelty, the Japanese soldiery abandoned any semblance of restraint. Women of every age, from small children to ancient elders, suffered innumerable rapes, in many cases dying from the mass raping alone. Those who did not die from sexual assault suffered death in other forms - shot, decapitated, or tortured to death once the soldiers found themselves sexually exhausted. Other women suffered fatal sexual torture involving the introduction of sharp foreign objects into their vagina or the placement of firecrackers or live grenades inside. Even Third Reich personnel in the city interceded in a sometimes futile effort to rescue victims from their tormentors. This book chronicles two of the most infamous events of the 20th century.

The Secret Behind the Rape of Nanking

A spiritual interview with Iris Chang refuting the facts of the Nanking Massacre that she wrote about in her book: The Rape of Nanking."

Author: Ryuho Okawa

Publisher: Irh Press USA Incorporated

ISBN: 9781942125006

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 99

IS THE RAPE OF NANKING A BOOK BASED ON FACTS? China has been rapidly gaining strength in recent years and is about to establish its status as a hegemony. At the same time, the Chinese government is taking the Nanking Massacre up to a whole new level in the international society. In June 2014, the Chinese government filed an application with UNESCO to register the history materials regarding the Nanking Massacre and the comfort women as "Memories of the World." The Rape of Nanking, which came out in 1997, is a book that greatly contributed to creating this trend. Due to the book, the term "Nanking Massacre" has recently resurfaced and spread rapidly throughout the world, starting with the United States. However, The Rape of Nanking has been brought up and argued by many experts as a ludicrous book, from the time it was published. The photos used in the book as records of cruel acts by the Japanese army are all photos that have been taken from elsewhere, completely irrelevant to the Japanese soldiers and Nanking. In order to provide a powerful material in identifying this issue, we have published The Secret Behind "The Rape of Nanking," a book revealing Chang's current state, the strong possibility of a conspiracy behind The Rape of Nanking and even the truth about her death. This was done by a method unheard of: summoning the spirit of Iris Chang from the spirit world. Regardless of whether or not you believe in a spiritual message phenomenon, as an individual human being, you cannot remain unmoved by her tears of apology and the truth in her plea, both coming from the bottom of her heart. And you will probably ask yourself, "What is the truth?" -- Ryuho Okawa