The Roman Street

In this book, Jeremy Hartnett explores the role of the ancient Roman street as the primary venue for social performance and political negotiations.

Author: Jeremy Hartnett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107105706

Category: Architecture

Page: 329

View: 793

In this book, Jeremy Hartnett explores the role of the ancient Roman street as the primary venue for social performance and political negotiations.

The Man in the Roman Street

This book looks at the changing attitudes and beliefs of the Roman people throughout the Empire from the accession of Augustus in 27 B.C. to the death of Theodosius the Great in 395 A.D. Religion, in which 'the human mind found its main ...

Author: Harold Mattingly

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393003376

Category: Fiction

Page: 156

View: 704

This book looks at the changing attitudes and beliefs of the Roman people throughout the Empire from the accession of Augustus in 27 B.C. to the death of Theodosius the Great in 395 A.D. Religion, in which 'the human mind found its main activity, ' is treated in depth: its distinctive features, the interplay between the traditions of Greece and Roman and the other religions of the East and West, the 'virtues' or 'powers' existing independently of the gods, and the worship of the Emperor. The influence of the philosophers, the Eastern mysteries, Judaism, and Christianity are also discussed, as are literature, art, history, science, and the quality of life for the individual Roman.

The Man in the Roman Street

Author: Harold Mattingly

Publisher: New York City : Numismatic Review

ISBN:

Category: Rome

Page: 116

View: 442

Through his interest in the currency and coins of the Roman empire the author analyzes the culture and social atmosphere of the time period and makes larger conclusions about aspects of Roman life.

Illustrations of the Remains of Roman Art

the Leauses Lane , * now called Lewis Lane , went thence in a nearly direct line
south - west to Aqua Sulis , or Solis , ( Bath , ) which latter city is sometimes called
Aqua Calidæ , also Accaman - ceaster , hence Acman Street . This Acman ...

Author: James Buckman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 155

View: 352


Origins of the Colonnaded Streets in the Cities of the Roman East

This book seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of the visual impact of the rows of colonnades defining the great avenues of numerous Eastern cities of the Roman Empire.

Author: Ross Burns

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198784546

Category: Design

Page: 432

View: 969

The colonnaded axes define the visitor's experience of many of the great cities of the Roman East. How did this extraordinarily bold tool of urban planning evolve? The street, instead of remaining a mundane passage, a convenient means of passing from one place to another, was in the course of little more than a century transformed in the Eastern provinces into a monumental landscape which could in one sweeping vision encompass the entire city. The colonnaded axes became the touchstone by which cities competed for status in the Eastern Empire. Though adopted as a sign of cities' prosperity under the Pax Romana, they were not particularly 'Roman' in their origin. Rather, they reflected the inventiveness, fertility of ideas and the dynamic role of civic patronage in the Eastern provinces in the first two centuries under Rome. This study will concentrate on the convergence of ideas behind these great avenues, examining over fifty sites in an attempt to work out the sequence in which ideas developed across a variety of regions-from North Africa around to Asia Minor. It will look at the phenomenon in the context of the consolidation of Roman rule.

Life in the Roman World of Nero and St Paul

A broad street with colonnades extended in a straight line through and beyond
the city for four miles, and was crossed by others at right angles. This street is
said to have been lighted at nights, while the Roman streets remained dark and ...

Author: T. G. Tucker

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 506

"Life in the Roman World of Nero and St. Paul" by T. G. Tucker. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Historical Enquiries concerning the Roman monuments and antiquities in the North Part of Britain called Scotland With copper cuts

The Writers upon Roman Medals confirm this by the account they give of the
Paffages and Bridges he made in his ... they were paved with Stones and Gravel ;
from whence they were called Streets from Strata , and Vie militares , regia e ...

Author: Sir Robert Sibbald

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 779


Streets Street Architechture and Social Presentation in Roman Italy

Author: Jeremy Scott Hartnett

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 261


A Description of the Roman Tessellated Pavement Found in Bucklersbury

At Pompeii , where of course the most perfect examples of Roman streets or ways
may be investigated , it is shown that , with the exception of the few direct and
principal thoroughfares , the roads were extremely irregular , and the houses and
 ...

Author: John Edward Price

Publisher: Westminster, Printed by Nichols and sons

ISBN:

Category: Bucklersbury pavement

Page: 78

View: 925


Life and Death in the Roman Suburb

“Si quis hic sederit: Streetside Benches and Urban Society in Pompeii” AJA 112:
91–119. Hartnett, J. 2017. The Roman Street: Urban Life and Society in Pompeii,
Herculaneum, and Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Haselberger
 ...

Author: Allison Emmerson

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198852754

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 342

Defined by borders both physical and conceptual, the Roman city stood apart as a concentration of life and activity that was legally, economically, and ritually divided from its rural surroundings. Death was a key area of control, and tombs were relegated outside city walls from the Republican period through Late Antiquity. Given this separation, an unexpected phenomenon marked the Augustan and early Imperial periods: Roman cities developed suburbs, built-up areas beyond their boundaries, where the living and the dead came together in densely urban environments. Life and Death in the Roman Suburb examines these districts, drawing on the archaeological remains of cities across Italy to understand the character of Roman suburbs and to illuminate the factors that led to their rise and decline, focusing especially on the tombs of the dead. Whereas work on Roman cities has tended to pass over funerary material, and research on death has concentrated on issues seen as separate from urbanism, Emmerson introduces a new paradigm, considering tombs within their suburban surroundings of shops, houses, workshops, garbage dumps, extramural sanctuaries, and major entertainment buildings, in order to trace the many roles they played within living cities. Her investigations show how tombs were not passive memorials, but active spaces that facilitated and furthered the social and economic life of the city, where relationships between the living and the dead were an enduring aspect of urban life.

The Culture of the Roman Plebs

This is the first attempt to reconstruct the life of the average Roman; looking at his culture, the songs he sang, the dances and music he preferred, the shows he saw, the games he played, the scraps of knowledge he accumulated, the Greek ...

Author: Nicholas Horsfall

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 982

This is the first attempt to reconstruct the life of the average Roman; looking at his culture, the songs he sang, the dances and music he preferred, the shows he saw, the games he played, the scraps of knowledge he accumulated, the Greek he learned from the Syrians across the landing, and the odds and ends of the history of Rome he had gathered up from statues, processions, and plays. All Latin is translated and all due care is taken of the non-specialist's requirements.

The Triumph of the Absurd

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 175


The Dancing Lares and the Serpent in the Garden

A reconsideration of seemingly humble gods that were central to the religious world of the Romans, this is also the first major account of the full range of lares worship in the homes, neighborhoods, and temples of ancient Rome.

Author: Harriet I. Flower

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888018

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 424

The most pervasive gods in ancient Rome had no traditional mythology attached to them, nor was their worship organized by elites. Throughout the Roman world, neighborhood street corners, farm boundaries, and household hearths featured small shrines to the beloved lares, a pair of cheerful little dancing gods. These shrines were maintained primarily by ordinary Romans, and often by slaves and freedmen, for whom the lares cult provided a unique public leadership role. In this comprehensive and richly illustrated book, the first to focus on the lares, Harriet Flower offers a strikingly original account of these gods and a new way of understanding the lived experience of everyday Roman religion. Weaving together a wide range of evidence, Flower sets forth a new interpretation of the much-disputed nature of the lares. She makes the case that they are not spirits of the dead, as many have argued, but rather benevolent protectors—gods of place, especially the household and the neighborhood, and of travel. She examines the rituals honoring the lares, their cult sites, and their iconography, as well as the meaning of the snakes often depicted alongside lares in paintings of gardens. She also looks at Compitalia, a popular midwinter neighborhood festival in honor of the lares, and describes how its politics played a key role in Rome’s increasing violence in the 60s and 50s BC, as well as in the efforts of Augustus to reach out to ordinary people living in the city’s local neighborhoods. A reconsideration of seemingly humble gods that were central to the religious world of the Romans, this is also the first major account of the full range of lares worship in the homes, neighborhoods, and temples of ancient Rome. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Proceedings of the Bath Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club

He does not say how the road got to the North Gate from Russell Street or where
his North Gate was , but the full result is gathered in conjunction with what is said
on an earlier page ( p . 8 ) when treating of the Roman walls . Here he writes ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bath (England)

Page:

View: 184


Transactions

wall , but on a lower level , and he was of opinion that that pavement , now five
feet below the surface , was on the level of the old Roman street at a very ancient
time . There was a very great difference with regard to the levels . In some parts of
 ...

Author: Leicestershire Archaeological and Historical Society

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Leicestershire (England)

Page:

View: 981


The Roman Retail Revolution

This volume focuses on food and drink outlets in particular, combining analysis of both archaeological material and textual sources to offer a thorough investigation into the social and economic worlds of the Roman shop.

Author: Steven J. R. Ellis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198769938

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 472

Tabernae were ubiquitous in all Roman cities, lining the busiest streets and dominating their most crowded intersections in numbers far exceeding those of any other form of building. That they played a vital role in the operation of the city, and indeed in the very definition of urbanizationin ancient Rome, is a point too often under-appreciated in Roman studies, and one which bears fruitful further exploration. The Roman Retail Revolution offers a thorough investigation into the social and economic worlds of the Roman shop, focusing on food and drink outlets in particular. Combining critical analysis of both archaeological material and textual sources, it challenges many of the conventional ideas about theplace of retailing in the Roman city and unravels the historical development of tabernae to identify three major waves or revolutions in the shaping of retail landscapes. The volume is underpinned by two new and important bodies of evidence: the first generated from the University of Cincinnati'srecent archaeological excavations into a Pompeian neighborhood of close to twenty shop-fronts, and the second resulting from a field-survey of the retail landscapes of more than a hundred cities from across the Roman world. The richness of this information, combined with the volume'sinterdisciplinary approach to the lives of the Roman sub-elite, results in a refreshingly original look at the history of retailing and urbanism in the Roman world.

Ancient Cambridgeshire Or An Attempt to Trace Roman and Other Ancient Roads that Passed Through the County of Cambridge

With a Record of the Places where Roman Coins and Other Remains Have Been
Found Charles Cardale Babington. about 200 yards upon the very line of the
Roman Street . ” Soon afterwards it forms the boundary of Cambridge and ...

Author: Charles Cardale Babington

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cambridge, History of

Page: 116

View: 932


A Day in Old Rome

Descriptions of daily Roman life including details about marriage, homes, food, costume, slaves, physicians, and libraries

Author: William Stearns Davis

Publisher: Biblo & Tannen Publishers

ISBN: 9780819601063

Category: History

Page: 482

View: 375

Descriptions of daily Roman life including details about marriage, homes, food, costume, slaves, physicians, and libraries

Rome the Cosmopolis

Using a number of analytical devices on a range of material including, Christian art, Latin poetry, human remains and Egyptian obelisks, the contributors to this study explore the ways in which Rome and its empire were interwoven.

Author: Catharine Edwards

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521030113

Category: Art

Page: 268

View: 491

Using a number of analytical devices on a range of material including, Christian art, Latin poetry, human remains and Egyptian obelisks, the contributors to this study explore the ways in which Rome and its empire were interwoven. The result is a startlingly original picture of the empire and the city.

The Royal history of England

The Romans taught the Britons to develop the resources of their country . They
opened up the island by making roads paved with stone . These were called
Strata ; 1 whence our word Street . They also laid the foundation of a lucrative
trade ...

Author: England

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 454