The Seven Storey Mountain

One of the most famous books ever written about a man’s search for faith and peace.

Author: Thomas Merton

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547543816

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 626

A modern-day Confessions of Saint Augustine, The Seven Storey Mountain is one of the most influential religious works of the twentieth century. This edition contains an introduction by Merton's editor, Robert Giroux, and a note to the reader by biographer William H. Shannon. It tells of the growing restlessness of a brilliant and passionate young man whose search for peace and faith leads him, at the age of twenty-six, to take vows in one of the most demanding Catholic orders—the Trappist monks. At the Abbey of Gethsemani, "the four walls of my new freedom," Thomas Merton struggles to withdraw from the world, but only after he has fully immersed himself in it. The Seven Storey Mountain has been a favorite of readers ranging from Graham Greene to Claire Booth Luce, Eldridge Cleaver, and Frank McCourt. Since its original publication this timeless spiritual tome has been published in over twenty languages and has touched millions of lives.

Preface to Japanese Edition of The Seven Storey Mountain

Author: Thomas Merton

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ISBN:

Category:

Page: 5

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Making America s Monk

Author: Andrea Lynn Neuhoff

Publisher:

ISBN:

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Page: 134

View: 692


La nuit priv e d toiles

Author: Thomas Merton (o.cist.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

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Page: 392

View: 228


Merton and Waugh

Most of all, we witness Merton the writing student and spiritual master and Waugh the master of prose and conflicted penitent.

Author: Mary Frances Coady

Publisher: Paraclete Press (MA)

ISBN: 9781612616285

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 160

View: 148

In this close examination of their friendship, through their correspondence, we see Waugh's coaching of a younger writer, and Waugh's brief infatuation with America. Most of all, we witness Merton the writing student and spiritual master and Waugh the master of prose and conflicted penitent.

The Rise of Liberal Religion

Thomas Merton, The Seven Storey Mountain (1948; New York: Harcourt Brace,
1998), 137, 113. Merton's title refers to the mountain of purgatory in Dante's
Divine Comedy. See “Books of the Month Appraised,” Catholic News, June 28,
1947.

Author: Matthew S. Hedstrom

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199705607

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 900

Winner of the Frank S. and Elizabeth D. Brewer Best First Book Prize of the American Society of Church History Society for U. S. Intellectual History Notable Title in American Intellectual History The story of liberal religion in the twentieth century, Matthew S. Hedstrom contends, is a story of cultural ascendency. This may come as a surprise-most scholarship in American religious history, after all, equates the numerical decline of the Protestant mainline with the failure of religious liberalism. Yet a look beyond the pews, into the wider culture, reveals a more complex and fascinating story, one Hedstrom tells in The Rise of Liberal Religion. Hedstrom attends especially to the critically important yet little-studied arena of religious book culture-particularly the religious middlebrow of mid-century-as the site where religious liberalism was most effectively popularized. By looking at book weeks, book clubs, public libraries, new publishing enterprises, key authors and bestsellers, wartime reading programs, and fan mail, among other sources, Hedstrom is able to provide a rich, on-the-ground account of the men, women, and organizations that drove religious liberalism's cultural rise in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. Critically, by the post-WWII period the religious middlebrow had expanded beyond its Protestant roots, using mystical and psychological spirituality as a platform for interreligious exchange. This compelling history of religion and book culture not only shows how reading and book buying were critical twentieth-century religious practices, but also provides a model for thinking about the relationship of religion to consumer culture more broadly. In this way, The Rise of Liberal Religion offers both innovative cultural history and new ways of seeing the imprint of liberal religion in our own times.

Religion and Literature

THOMAS MERTON, THE SEVEN STOREY MOUNTAIN Thomas Merton (1915-
1968) was born in France, educated in England, and spent most of his adult life
in the United States. Much of his youth was spent traveling and partying, even as
 ...

Author: Robert Detweiler

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 9780664258467

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 191

View: 789

Featuring a selection from over 80 key texts, this anthology aims to help the reader to understand the common origins of religious expression and of literature. The texts included cover classical literature, the Bible, English and European classics and contemporary works.

The Seven Mountains of Thomas Merton

In New York , the appearance of The Seven Storey Mountain created little
immediate stir . The book was not reviewed in The New York Times . Naomi
Burton was exasperated to find that copies delivered to some bookstores had
been put on ...

Author: Michael Mott

Publisher: Harvest Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 696

View: 807

Derived from Merton's personal journals and letters, and from the recollections of intimate friends, this authorized narrative catches the character of the man, the artist, and the Catholic priest

Merton Waugh

But in this brief but thoroughly researched book, Coady provides important new details about Merton's role not just as willing student but as spiritual advisor to Waugh and puts those details into the cultural and religious context of the ...

Author: Mary Frances Coady

Publisher: Paraclete Press

ISBN: 1612617115

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 475

From 1948 to 1952 the lives of Trappist monk Thomas Merton and British novelist Evelyn Waugh were closely intertwined. During these years, Waugh became enthusiastic about American Catholicism, and in particular, monasticism as seen through the eyes of the author of The Seven Storey Mountain. He agreed to edit Merton’s autobiography and the subsequent Waters of Siloe for publication in Britain. In this close examination of their friendship, through their correspondence, we see Waugh’s coaching of a younger writer and Waugh’s brief infatuation with America. Most of all, we witness Merton the writing student and spiritual master and Waugh the master of prose and conflicted penitent. And we see how the two men diverge as the Second Vatican Council takes hold in Catholicism and the church experiences profound change. "This careful study sheds light on Merton the writer with Evelyn Waugh as his tutor. It is also an interesting snapshot of the culture of midtwentieth century Catholic renewal." —Lawrence S. Cunningham, John A. O'Brien Professor of Theology (Emeritus), The University of Notre Dame “An absorbing exchange of letters between Thomas Merton and Evelyn Waugh, focusing principally on Waugh’s editing of the British publication of The Seven Storey Mountain and The Waters of Siloe. Waugh’s sometimes barbed comments caused Merton to reflect deeper on what he was writing and how he should respond, as positively as he could, to this influential Catholic novelist. A wonderful, brief study of both men.” —Patrick Samway, S.J., editor of The Letters of Robert Giroux and Thomas Merton (forthcoming, University of Notre Dame Press, 2015) “Dedicated readers of Evelyn Waugh and Thomas Merton know of the connections between two major Catholic writers, especially of Waugh as editor and writing coach for Merton's work. But in this brief but thoroughly researched book, Coady provides important new details about Merton's role not just as willing student but as spiritual advisor to Waugh and puts those details into the cultural and religious context of the years after World War II in clear and sometimes eloquent fashion.” —Robert Murray Davis, author of Brideshead Revisited: The Past Redeemed

Besides the Bible

... John Pattison. THE SEVEN STOREY MOUNTAIN by Thomas Merton ... The
twentieth century was a golden age for spiritual memoir and autobiography, and
Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain stands above them all. Part of what
 ...

Author: Dan Gibson

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 083085858X

Category: Religion

Page: 261

View: 775

How do you decide what to read? Dan Gibson, Jordan Green and John Pattison have created this tool to make your choices easier. Besides the Bible is a guide to the wide array of great books that they believe every Christian should read—the ones that matter to the church and the world.

Echoing Silence

It was a relatively short-lived resolution, for Merton almost immediately found himself being assigned writing tasks by his Abbot--one of which was the autobiographical essay that blossomed into his international best-seller The Seven ...

Author: Thomas Merton

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN: 1590303482

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 215

View: 607

When Thomas Merton entered a Trappist monastery in December 1941, he turned his back on secular life—including a very promising literary career. He sent his journals, a novel-in-progess, and copies of all his poems to his mentor, Columbia professor Mark Van Doren, for safe keeping, fully expecting to write little, if anything, ever again. It was a relatively short-lived resolution, for Merton almost immediately found himself being assigned writing tasks by his Abbot—one of which was the autobiographical essay that blossomed into his international best-seller The Seven Storey Mountain. That book made him famous overnight, and for a time he struggled with the notion that the vocation of the monk and the vocation of the writer were incompatible. Monasticism called for complete surrender to the absolute, whereas writing demanded a tactical withdrawal from experience in order to record it. He eventually came to accept his dual vocation as two sides of the same spiritual coin and used it as a source of creative tension the rest of his life. Merton’s thoughts on writing have never been compiled into a single volume until now. Robert Inchausti has mined the vast Merton literature to discover what he had to say on a whole spectrum of literary topics, including writing as a spiritual calling, the role of the Christian writer in a secular society, the joys and mysteries of poetry, and evaluations of his own literary work. Also included are fascinating glimpses of his take on a range of other writers, including Henry David Thoreau, Flannery O’Connor, Dylan Thomas, Albert Camus, James Joyce, and even Henry Miller, along with many others.

Survival or Prophecy

Thomas Merton, the American Trappist monk who wrote The Seven Storey Mountain, spent his entire literary career (1948- 68) in a cloistered monastery in Kentucky.

Author: Thomas Merton

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1466802936

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 935

Introduction by Archbishop Rembert G. Weakland. Two monks in conversation about the meaning of life and the nature of solitude. Thomas Merton, the American Trappist monk who wrote The Seven Storey Mountain, spent his entire literary career (1948- 68) in a cloistered monastery in Kentucky. His great counterpart, the French Benedictine monk Jean Leclercq, spent those years traveling relentlessly to and from monasteries worldwide, trying to bring about a long-needed reform and renewal of Catholic religious life. Their correspondence over twenty years is a fascinating record of the common yearnings of two ambitious, holy men. "What is a monk?" is the question at the center of their correspondence, and in these 120 letters they answer it with great aplomb, touching on the role of ancient texts and modern conveniences; the advantages of hermit life and community life; the fierce Catholicism of the monastic past and the new openness to the approaches of other traditions; the monastery's impulse toward survival and the monk's calling to prophecy. Full of learning, human insight, and self-deprecating wit, these letters capture the excitement of the Catholic Church during the run-up to the Second Vatican Council, full of wisdom, full of promise.

Living with Wisdom

Author: Forest, Jim

Publisher: Orbis Books

ISBN: 1608330788

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 471


Kierkegaard s Influence on Theology

As a monastic of the Order of Cistercians of Strict Observance ( O.C.S.O. ) ,
Merton made his debut as a writer with the publication of his autobiography , The
Seven Storey Mountain ( 1948 ) . ' Yet he resisted the stereotype of the monk as
an ...

Author: Jon Stewart

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409444800

Category: Religion

Page: 220

View: 715

Tome III explores the reception of Kierkegaard's thought in the Catholic and Jewish theological traditions. In the 1920s Kierkegaard's intellectual and spiritual legacy became widely discussed in the Catholic Hochland Circle, whose members included Theodor Haecker, Romano Guardini, Alois Dempf and Peter Wust. Another key figure of the mid-war years was the prolific Jesuit author Erich Przywara. The second part of Tome III focuses on the reception of Kierkegaard's thought in the Jewish theological tradition, introducing the reader to authors who significantly shaped Jewish religious thought both in the United States and in Israel.

The Life You Save May Be Your Own

... and Kafka, and a medieval miracle play, called 'The Seven Storey Mountain.'
Ithas been brewing fora long time ...” Six months later The Seven Storey
Mountain was finished: a “straight biography, with a lotofcomment and reflection.

Author: Paul Elie

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429923954

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 576

View: 616

The story of four modern American Catholics who made literature out of their search for God In the mid-twentieth century four American Catholics came to believe that the best way to explore the questions of religious faith was to write about them-in works that readers of all kinds could admire. The Life You Save May Be Your Own is their story-a vivid and enthralling account of great writers and their power over us. Thomas Merton was a Trappist monk in Kentucky; Dorothy Day the founder of the Catholic Worker in New York; Flannery O'Connor a "Christ-haunted" literary prodigy in Georgia; Walker Percy a doctor in New Orleans who quit medicine to write fiction and philosophy. A friend came up with a name for them-the School of the Holy Ghost-and for three decades they exchanged letters, ardently read one another's books, and grappled with what one of them called a "predicament shared in common." A pilgrimage is a journey taken in light of a story; and in The Life You Save May Be Your Own Paul Elie tells these writers' story as a pilgrimage from the God-obsessed literary past of Dante and Dostoevsky out into the thrilling chaos of postwar American life. It is a story of how the Catholic faith, in their vision of things, took on forms the faithful could not have anticipated. And it is a story about the ways we look to great books and writers to help us make sense of our experience, about the power of literature to change-to save-our lives.

The Solitary Explorer

Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain came too early in life to
encompass his whole story. He lived—indeed, very intensely— for twenty years
beyond the publication of the autobiography in 1948. That book, which made him
famous, ...

Author: Elena Malits

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1498204643

Category: Religion

Page: 190

View: 543

The Solitary Explorer responsibly and critically explores Thomas Merton's lifelong spiritual development as reflected in his religious and secular writings and delineates the meaning of his life and work for contemporary readers. It provides an interpretive chronology of Merton's writings and unravels the intertwining threads of self-realization and widening intellectual interests evidenced in the material he produced between his early autobiography and the controversial work of his later years. Elena Malits shows Merton as writer, as monk, as social critic, as seeker of wisdom in the East, as man of prayer, and as one continually on a journey into the unknown. Merton always held that the quest for God is a continuing one: The Solitary Explorer traces the progress of this quest in Merton's life and literary works to reveal a multifaceted spiritual guide who offers an approach to the divine at once reassuringly traditional and refreshingly contemporary.

The Letters of Robert Giroux and Thomas Merton

Patrick Samway, S.J., had unparalleled access not only to the materials assembled here but to Giroux's unpublished talks about Merton, which he uses to his advantage, especially in his beautifully crafted introduction that interweaves the ...

Author: Patrick Samway, S.J.

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 0268092885

Category: Religion

Page: 408

View: 191

From the time they first met as undergraduates at Columbia College in New York City in the mid-1930s, the noted editor Robert Giroux (1914–2008) and the Trappist monk and writer Thomas Merton (1915–1968) became friends. The Letters of Robert Giroux and Thomas Merton capture their personal and professional relationship, extending from the time of the publication of Merton's 1948 best-selling spiritual autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain, until a few months before Merton's untimely death in December 1968. As editor-in-chief at Harcourt, Brace & Company and then at Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Giroux not only edited twenty-six of Merton's books but served as an adviser to Merton as he dealt with unexpected problems with his religious superiors at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani in Kentucky, as well as those in France and Italy. These letters, arranged chronologically, offer invaluable insights into the publishing process that brought some of Merton's most important writings to his readers. Patrick Samway, S.J., had unparalleled access not only to the materials assembled here but to Giroux's unpublished talks about Merton, which he uses to his advantage, especially in his beautifully crafted introduction that interweaves the stories of both men with a chronicle of their personal and collaborative relationship. The result is a rich and rewarding volume, which shows how Giroux helped Merton to become one of the greatest spiritual writers of the twentieth century.

The Catholic Counterculture in America 1933 1962

Author: James Terence Fisher

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 305

View: 285

Catholic Counterculture in America, 1933-1962

The Kentucky Anthology

His best-known book is his spiritual autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain (
1948), which chronicles his pilgrimage from a youthful profligate life to his
conversion and decision to enter the monastery. In the 1960s he wrote on many
topics ...

Author: Wade Hall

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813128994

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 896

View: 939

Long before the official establishment of the Commonwealth, intrepid pioneers ventured west of the Allegheny Mountains into an expansive, alluring wilderness that they began to call Kentucky. After blazing trails, clearing plots, and surviving innumerable challenges, a few adventurers found time to pen celebratory tributes to their new homeland. In the two centuries that followed, many of the world’s finest writers, both native Kentuckians and visitors, have paid homage to the Bluegrass State with the written word. In The Kentucky Anthology, acclaimed author and literary historian Wade Hall has assembled an unprecedented and comprehensive compilation of writings pertaining to Kentucky and its land, people, and culture. Hall’s introductions to each author frame both popular and lesser-known selections in a historical context. He examines the major cultural and political developments in the history of the Commonwealth, finding both parallels and marked distinctions between Kentucky and the rest of the United States. While honoring the heritage of Kentucky in all its glory, Hall does not blithely turn away from the state’s most troubling episodes and institutions such as racism, slavery, and war. Hall also builds the argument, bolstered by the strength and significance of the collected writings, that Kentucky’s best writers compare favorably with the finest in the world. Many of the authors presented here remain universally renowned and beloved, while others have faded into the tides of time, waiting for rediscovery. Together, they guide the reader on a literary tour of Kentucky, from the mines to the rivers and from the deepest hollows to the highest peaks. The Kentucky Anthology traces the interests and aspirations, the achievements and failures and the comedies and tragedies that have filled the lives of generations of Kentuckians. These diaries, letters, speeches, essays, poems, and stories bring history brilliantly to life. Jesse Stuart once wrote, “If these United States can be called a body, Kentucky can be called its heart.” The Kentucky Anthology captures the rhythm and spirit of that heart in the words of its most remarkable chroniclers.

Religion in America Since 1945

Another religious best-seller of the early postwar years, Thomas Merton's The
Seven Storey Mountain (1948), also shows a greater Catholic resistance to the
modern world than that of liberal Protestants and Reform Jews. Merton (1915–
1968) ...

Author: Patrick Allitt

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231509316

Category: Religion

Page: 384

View: 460

Moving far beyond the realm of traditional "church history," Patrick Allitt here offers a vigorous and erudite survey of the broad canvas of American religion since World War II. Identifying the major trends and telling moments within major denominations and also in less formal religious movements, he asks how these religious groups have shaped, and been shaped by, some of the most important and divisive issues and events of the last half century: the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, feminism and the sexual revolution, abortion rights, the antinuclear and environmentalist movements, and many others. Allitt argues that the boundaries between religious and political discourse have become increasingly blurred in the last fifty years. Having been divided along denominational lines in the early postwar period, religious Americans had come by the 1980s to be divided along political lines instead, as they grappled with the challenges of modernity and secularism. Partly because of this politicization, and partly because of the growing influence of Asian, Latino, and other ethnic groups, the United States is anomalous among the Western industrialized nations, as church membership and religious affiliation generally increased during this period. Religion in America Since 1945 is a masterful analysis of this dynamism and diversity and an ideal starting point for any exploration of the contemporary religious scene.