Victorian Scientific Naturalism

Ranging in topic from daring climbing expeditions in the Alps to the maintenance of aristocratic protocols of conduct at Kew Gardens, these essays offer a series of new perspectives on Victorian scientific naturalism—as well as its ...

Author: Bernard Lightman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022610964X

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 606

Victorian Scientific Naturalism examines the secular creeds of the generation of intellectuals who, in the wake of The Origin of Species, wrested cultural authority from the old Anglican establishment while installing themselves as a new professional scientific elite. These scientific naturalists—led by biologists, physicists, and mathematicians such as William Kingdon Clifford, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Thomas Henry Huxley, and John Tyndall—sought to persuade both the state and the public that scientists, not theologians, should be granted cultural authority, since their expertise gave them special insight into society, politics, and even ethics. In Victorian Scientific Naturalism, Gowan Dawson and Bernard Lightman bring together new essays by leading historians of science and literary critics that recall these scientific naturalists, in light of recent scholarship that has tended to sideline them, and that reevaluate their place in the broader landscape of nineteenth-century Britain. Ranging in topic from daring climbing expeditions in the Alps to the maintenance of aristocratic protocols of conduct at Kew Gardens, these essays offer a series of new perspectives on Victorian scientific naturalism—as well as its subsequent incarnations in the early twentieth century—that together provide an innovative understanding of the movement centering on the issues of community, identity, and continuity.

The Age of Scientific Naturalism

This includes the contributors to Dawson and Lightman (eds), Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity. B. Lightman, Victorian Popularizers of Science: Designing Nature for New Audiences (Chicago, IL, ...

Author: Michael S. Reidy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317318285

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 986

The essays in this volume focus on the way Victorian Physicist John Tyndall and his correspondents developed their ideas through letters, periodicals and journals and challenge assumptions about who gained authority, and how they attained and defended their position within the scientific community.

After Science and Religion

Not only was Darwin's naturalistic approach to science an inspiration to many of the scientific naturalists; ... Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014), 20.

Author: Peter Harrison

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316517926

Category: Religion

Page: 330

View: 194

A ground-breaking volume of innovative conversations between science and religion which move beyond hackneyed positions of either conflict or dialogue.

George Wilson s Vision of Early Victorian Science and Technology

In Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity, edited by Gowan Dawson and Bernard Lightman, 1–24. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Desmond, Adrian. 1989. The Politics of Evolution: Morphology, Medicine, ...

Author: David F. Channell

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1000730581

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 123

This volume is a comprehensive study of George Wilson, a leading advocate for evangelical science and for the role of biology in technology – it examines his work to develop a unitary vision of Victorian science and technology by drawing upon religion, transcendental natural history, and Baconian philosophy George Wilson was the first Regius Professor of Technology at the University of Edinburgh and the founding Director of the Industrial Museum of Scotland (now the National Museum of Scotland). Throughout his career he lectured and published on a wide range of topics, including the prospect of life on other planets, the history of science, natural theology, chemistry and poetry. His works were very popular - he was praised by Charles Dickens and his lectures drew large audiences, particularly women. Wilson sought to educate people about the significant scientific and technological developments taking place during the first half of the nineteenth century and create a unitary vision of science and technology. This book is largely based on Wilson’s own writings, and it is the first book-length study of him published in the last 160 years. This book is essential for researchers and scholars alike interested in Victorian science and technology.

Epistemic Virtues in the Sciences and the Humanities

In Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity, ed. Gowan Dawson and Bernard Lightman, 1–24. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Echterhölter, Anna. 2012. Schattengefechte: Genealogische Praktiken in Nachrufen auf ...

Author: Jeroen van Dongen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319488937

Category: Science

Page: 198

View: 892

This book explores how physicists, astronomers, chemists, and historians in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries employed ‘epistemic virtues’ such as accuracy, objectivity, and intellectual courage. In doing so, it takes the first step in providing an integrated history of the sciences and humanities. It assists in addressing such questions as: What kind of perspective would enable us to compare organic chemists in their labs with paleographers in the Vatican Archives, or anthropologists on a field trip with mathematicians poring over their formulas? While the concept of epistemic virtues has previously been discussed, primarily in the contexts of the history and philosophy of science, this volume is the first to enlist the concept in bridging the gap between the histories of the sciences and the humanities. Chapters research whether epistemic virtues can serve as a tool to transcend the institutional disciplinary boundaries and thus help to attain a ‘post-disciplinary’ historiography of modern knowledge. Readers will gain a contextualization of epistemic virtues in time and space as the book shows that scholars themselves often spoke in terms of virtue and vice about their tasks and accomplishments. This collection of essays opens up new perspectives on questions, discourses, and practices shared across the disciplines, even at a time when the neo-Kantian distinction between sciences and humanities enjoyed its greatest authority. Scholars including historians of science and of the humanities, intellectual historians, virtue epistemologists, and philosophers of science will all find this book of particular interest and value.

Making a Grade

“Economies of Scales: Evolutionary Naturalists and the Victorian Examination System.” In Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity, edited by Gowan Dawson and Bernard Lightman, 131–56.

Author: James Elwick

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 148750893X

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 398

Making a Grade takes historiographic and sociological perspectives developed to understand large-scale scientific and technical systems and uses them to highlight the standardization that went into "standardized testing."

Science Without God

Rethinking the History of Scientific Naturalism Peter Harrison, Jon H. Roberts ... of Scale: Evolutionary Naturalists and the Victorian Examination System, in Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity, ed.

Author: Peter Harrison

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192571540

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 924

Can scientific explanation ever make reference to God or the supernatural? The present consensus is no; indeed, a naturalistic stance is usually taken to be a distinguishing feature of modern science. Some would go further still, maintaining that the success of scientific explanation actually provides compelling evidence that there are no supernatural entities, and that true science, from the very beginning, was opposed to religious thinking. Science without God? Rethinking the History of Scientific Naturalism shows that the history of Western science presents us with a more nuanced picture. Beginning with the naturalists of ancient Greece, and proceeding through the middle ages, the scientific revolution, and into the nineteenth century, the contributors examine past ideas about 'nature' and 'the supernatural'. Ranging over different scientific disciplines and historical periods, they show how past thinkers often relied upon theological ideas and presuppositions in their systematic investigations of the world. In addition to providing material that contributes to a history of 'nature' and naturalism, this collection challenges a number of widely held misconceptions about the history of scientific naturalism.

Evolution and Victorian Musical Culture

bound up with popular literary culture in ways that vernacularize complex scientific ideas31 through general ... Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2014, 1; ...

Author: Bennett Zon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107020441

Category: History

Page: 370

View: 287

Explores the musical background to Darwinism and the development of the relationship between science and the arts in Victorian Britain.

Physics and Psychics

In taking scientific and rational enquiry in these directions, proponents of alternative sciences were both extending and challenging ... Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity (Chicago University Press, 2014).

Author: Richard Noakes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107188547

Category: History

Page: 421

View: 182

Noakes' revelatory analysis of Victorian scientists' fascination with psychic phenomena connects science, the occult and religion in intriguing new ways.

Identity in a Secular Age

For further discussion of the general context, see Gowan Dawson and Bernard Lightman, eds., Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Community, Identity, Continuity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014); Bernard Lightman and Michael S.

Author: Fern Elsdon-Baker

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 0822987694

Category: Science

Page: 276

View: 943

Although historians have suggested for some time that we move away from the assumption of a necessary clash between science and religion, the conflict narrative persists in contemporary discourse. But why? And how do we really know what people actually think about evolutionary science, let alone the many and varied ways in which it might relate to individual belief? In this multidisciplinary volume, experts in history and philosophy of science, oral history, sociology of religion, social psychology, and science communication and public engagement look beyond two warring systems of thought. They consider a far more complex, multifaceted, and distinctly more interesting picture of how differing groups along a spectrum of worldviews—including atheistic, agnostic, and faith groups—relate to and form the ongoing narrative of a necessary clash between evolution and faith. By ascribing agency to the public, from the nineteenth century to the present and across Canada and the United Kingdom, this volume offers a much more nuanced analysis of people’s perceptions about the relationship between evolutionary science, religion, and personal belief, one that better elucidates the complexities not only of that relationship but of actual lived experience.