Visions of Venice in Shakespeare

of nationhood,6 Venice is construed as the ultimate fictional landscape of otherness, a representation that resembles reality in its being inescapably bound up with the sea. In the association with the city, the sea appears both as a ...

Author: Laura Tosi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317001303

Category: Drama

Page: 278

View: 557

Despite the growing critical relevance of Shakespeare's two Venetian plays and a burgeoning bibliography on both The Merchant of Venice and Othello, few books have dealt extensively with the relationship between Shakespeare and Venice. Setting out to offer new perspectives to a traditional topic, this timely collection fills a gap in the literature, addressing the new historical, political and economic questions that have been raised in the last few years. The essays in this volume consider Venice a real as well as symbolic landscape that needs to be explored in its multiple resonances, both in Shakespeare's historical context and in the later tradition of reconfiguring one of the most represented cities in Western culture. Shylock and Othello are there to remind us of the dark sides of the myth of Venice, and of the inescapable fact that the issues raised in the Venetian plays are tremendously topical; we are still haunted by these theatrical casualties of early modern multiculturalism.

Visions of Venice

... interest to note that in taking this view landscape an intuitive and expressive colour sense . I SANTA 1 , immediately g on the - study was ve composiships of forms VISA / 11 un 17 Cb p ist a Ga a it HA म Christa. Visions Venice of of.

Author: Michael Spender

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 127

View: 330


Visions of Venice in Shakespeare

This timely collection fills a gap in the literature, addressing the new historical, political and economic questi

Author: Laura Tosi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780367882556

Category:

Page: 278

View: 221

Despite the growing critical relevance of Shakespeare's two Venetian plays and a burgeoning bibliography on both The Merchant of Venice and Othello, few books have dealt extensively with the relationship between Shakespeare and Venice. Setting out to offer new perspectives to a traditional topic, this timely collection fills a gap in the literature, addressing the new historical, political and economic questions that have been raised in the last few years. The essays in this volume consider Venice a real as well as symbolic landscape that needs to be explored in its multiple resonances, both in Shakespeare's historical context and in the later tradition of reconfiguring one of the most represented cities in Western culture. Shylock and Othello are there to remind us of the dark sides of the myth of Venice, and of the inescapable fact that the issues raised in the Venetian plays are tremendously topical; we are still haunted by these theatrical casualties of early modern multiculturalism.

Venetian Views Venetian Blinds

This trope is carried to further extremes in apocalyptic visions of Venice . Mary Shelley's Last Man shows a defaced Venice where the traces of civilization are wiped out and the city is swallowed up by the sea ; other apocalyptic ...

Author: Manfred Pfister

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789042007475

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 255

View: 337

Half a millennium of English and American fantasies of Venice: this collection of essays by leading critics in the field explores the continued and continuing fascination of travellers, writers, artists, theatre workers and film makers with the amphibious and ambiguous city in the lagoon. There is hardly another place in Europe that has become so much of a palimpsest, inscribed with the fantasies, the dreams and nightmares of generations of foreigners, and this turns Venetian Views, Venetian Blinds into a particularly pertinent case study of the ways cultural difference within Europe is experienced, enacted and constructed. The essays range across five centuries - from the Renaissance to our postmodern present, from Shakespeare and his contemporary Coryate to recent novels, detective fiction and films - and, in contrast to previous studies focussing on the Grand Tour, they emphasise more recent developments and how they continue or disrupt traditional ways of perceiving - or being blind to! - Venice.

Images of Light Visions of Venice

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781615390793

Category: Painting

Page:

View: 121


The Venice Myth

Here, I examine the ways in which nostalgia and politics may be linked to tourism in these idyllic remembered visions of the city. The fourth and fifth chapters draw on the cultural history of Venice in the 1920s and 1930s to explore ...

Author: David Barnes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317317505

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 351

Venice holds a unique place in literary and cultural history. Barnes looks at the themes of war, occupation, resistance and fascism to see how the political background has affected the literary works that have come out of this great city. He focuses on key British and American writers, including Byron, Ruskin, Pound and Eliot.

Shakespeare s Foreign Worlds

As a revision of its source story in Il Pecorone, The Merchant of Venice works as a defense against the subtext's darker vision of a state on the brink of cultural and political disintegration. It exchanges the vision of Venice in ...

Author: Carole Levin

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457718

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 514

In Shakespeare's Foreign Worlds, Carole Levin and John Watkins focus on the relationship between the London-based professional theater preeminently associated with William Shakespeare and an unprecedented European experience of geographic, social, and intellectual mobility. Shakespeare's plays bear the marks of exile and exploration, rural depopulation, urban expansion, and shifting mercantile and diplomatic configurations. He fills his plays with characters testing the limits of personal identity: foreigners, usurpers, outcasts, outlaws, scolds, shrews, witches, mercenaries, and cross-dressers. Through parallel discussions of Henry VI, The Taming of the Shrew, and The Merchant of Venice, Levin and Watkins argue that Shakespeare's centrality to English national consciousness is inseparable from his creation of the foreign as a category asserting dangerous affinities between England's internal minorities and its competitors within an increasingly fraught European mercantile system. As a women's historian, Levin is particularly interested in Shakespeare's responses to marginalized sectors of English society. As a scholar of English, Italian Studies, and Medieval Studies, Watkins situates Shakespeare in the context of broadly European historical movements. Together Levin and Watkins narrate the emergence of the foreign as portable category that might be applied both to "strangers" from other countries and to native-born English men and women, such as religious dissidents, who resisted conformity to an increasingly narrow sense of English identity. Shakespeare's Foreign Worlds will appeal to historians, literary scholars, theater specialists, and anyone interested in Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Age.

Visions of Venice

A book of images revealing the many facets of Venice and Venetian life. The photographs spanning over 25 years bring a fragile and beautiful city alive.

Author: Martyn Steel

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781320726283

Category:

Page:

View: 862

A book of images revealing the many facets of Venice and Venetian life. The photographs spanning over 25 years bring a fragile and beautiful city alive.

Venice and the Slavs

Two other works , appearing in Venice in those same years , suggested alternative mid - century visions of Venetian Dalmatia , from Slavic and Roman perspectives . The Dalmatian Filip Grabovac , an army chaplain , published in Venice in ...

Author: Larry Wolff

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804739467

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 969

This book studies the nature of Venetian rule over the Slavs of Dalmatia during the eighteenth century, focusing on the cultural elaboration of an ideology of empire that was based on a civilizing mission toward the Slavs. The book argues that the Enlightenment within the “Adriatic Empire” of Venice was deeply concerned with exploring the economic and social dimensions of backwardness in Dalmatia, in accordance with the evolving distinction between “Western Europe” and “Eastern Europe” across the continent. It further argues that the primitivism attributed to Dalmatians by the Venetian Enlightenment was fundamental to the European intellectual discovery of the Slavs. The book begins by discussing Venetian literary perspectives on Dalmatia, notably the drama of Carlo Goldoni and the memoirs of Carlo Gozzi. It then studies the work that brought the subject of Dalmatia to the attention of the European Enlightenment: the travel account of the Paduan philosopher Alberto Fortis, which was translated from Italian into English, French, and German. The next two chapters focus on the Dalmatian inland mountain people called the Morlacchi, famous as “savages” throughout Europe in the eighteenth century. The Morlacchi are considered first as a concern of Venetian administration and then in relation to the problem of the “noble savage,” anthropologically studied and poetically celebrated. The book then describes the meeting of these administrative and philosophical discourses concerning Dalmatia during the final decades of the Venetian Republic. It concludes by assessing the legacy of the Venetian Enlightenment for later perspectives on Dalmatia and the South Slavs from Napoleonic Illyria to twentieth-century Yugoslavia.

Othello s Secret

Visions of Venice in Shakespeare (Tosi and Bassi 2011) claims to see both Othello and The Merchant of Venice in a variety of ways that have traction in today's world. But in the case of Othello, this otherwise excellent collection of ...

Author: R M Christofides

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474212980

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 136

View: 474

Othello's Secret uncovers the relationship between the play and the conflicts that have torn apart its Cypriot setting, providing a new and powerfully political reading. Exploring the domestic and military anxieties connected by Shakespeare, Christofides highlights the ways in which these issues resonate with current ideological and geographical divisions in Cyprus, divisions rooted in the 16th century struggles to control the island. Challenging the conventional view of Othello as a Venetian play, this book offers a fierce and personal example of how early modern literature can purposefully contribute to even the most complex geopolitical debates.