Why the West Rules for Now

The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429977043

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 722

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the West's rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the twentieth century secured its global supremacy. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, many worry that the emerging economic power of China and India spells the end of the West as a superpower. In order to understand this possibility, we need to look back in time. Why has the West dominated the globe for the past two hundred years, and will its power last? Describing the patterns of human history, the archaeologist and historian Ian Morris offers surprising new answers to both questions. It is not, he reveals, differences of race or culture, or even the strivings of great individuals, that explain Western dominance. It is the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, the world will change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process. Deeply researched and brilliantly argued, Why the West Rules—for Now spans fifty thousand years of history and offers fresh insights on nearly every page. The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years.

The Right to Rule

Daniel Bell, The End of Ideology (Harvard University Press, 1988), 279; Toynbee,
A Study of History, vol. 1, 223–46; McNeill, The Rise of the West, 29–63; and Ian
Morris, Why the West Rules—For Now (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2010), 39–80.

Author: Hugh De Santis

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1793624097

Category: History

Page: 382

View: 765

In The Right to Rule: American Exceptionalism and the Coming Multipolar World Order, Hugh De Santis explores the evolution of American exceptionalism and its effect on the nation’s relations with the external world. De Santis argues that the self-image of an exceptional, providentially blessed society unlike any other is a myth that pays too little heed to the history that shaped America’s emergence, including its core beliefs and values, which are inheritances from seventeenth-century England. From the republic’s founding to its rise as the world’s preeminent power, American exceptionalism has underpinned the nation’s foreign policy, but it has become an anachronism in the twenty-first century. De Santis argues that, in the emerging multipolar world order, the United States will be one of several powers that determine the structure and rules of international politics, rather than the sole arbiter.

The Open Sea

Why the West Rules—for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal
about the Future. New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux. ———. (2009). “The Greater
Athenian State,” in The Dynamics of Ancient Empires: State Power from Assyria
to ...

Author: J. G. Manning

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691151741

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 464

A major new economic history of the ancient Mediterranean world In The Open Sea, J. G. Manning offers a major new history of economic life in the Mediterranean world in the Iron Age, from Phoenician trading down to the Hellenistic era and the beginning of Rome's imperial supremacy. Drawing on a wide range of ancient sources and the latest social theory, Manning suggests that a search for an illusory single "ancient economy" has obscured the diversity of lived experience in the Mediterranean world, including both changes in political economies over time and differences in cultural conceptions of property and money. At the same time, he shows how the region's economies became increasingly interconnected during this period. The Open Sea argues that the keys to understanding the region's rapid social and economic change during the Iron Age are the variety of economic and political solutions its different cultures devised, the patterns of cross-cultural exchange, and the sharp environmental contrasts between Egypt, the Near East, and Greece and Rome. The book examines long-run drivers of change, such as climate, together with the most important economic institutions of the premodern Mediterranean--coinage, money, agriculture, and private property. It also explores the role of economic growth, states, and legal institutions in the region's various economies. A groundbreaking economic history of the ancient Mediterranean world, The Open Sea shows that the origins of the modern economy extend far beyond Greece and Rome.

The Greeks

Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history and features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 558

View: 567

Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history and features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period.

The Dark Ages of Greece

This book considers what can be known about the social, economic and religious life; the hero cults, tombs, and urban centres; and the origins, meaning and purpose of the enduring myths of ancient Greece during the period between the ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780748615728

Category: Greece

Page: 352

View: 854

This book considers what can be known about the social, economic and religious life; the hero cults, tombs, and urban centres; and the origins, meaning and purpose of the enduring myths of ancient Greece during the period between the collapse of Mycenaean civilization at the end of the eleventh century BC and the beginning of the Archaic period some four and a half centuries later.

Death Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity

Shows how the excavated remains of burials are a major source of evidence for social historians of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521376112

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 493

Shows how the excavated remains of burials are a major source of evidence for social historians of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

The Measure of Civilization

11. ian Morris, Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of History, and What
They Reveal about the Future (new york: farrar, straus and Giroux, 2010); http://
www.ianmorris.org. 12. Peter turchin, Historical Dynamics: Why States Rise and ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400844762

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 383

A groundbreaking look at Western and Eastern social development from the end of the ice age to today In the past thirty years, there have been fierce debates over how civilizations develop and why the West became so powerful. The Measure of Civilization presents a brand-new way of investigating these questions and provides new tools for assessing the long-term growth of societies. Using a groundbreaking numerical index of social development that compares societies in different times and places, award-winning author Ian Morris sets forth a sweeping examination of Eastern and Western development across 15,000 years since the end of the last ice age. He offers surprising conclusions about when and why the West came to dominate the world and fresh perspectives for thinking about the twenty-first century. Adapting the United Nations' approach for measuring human development, Morris's index breaks social development into four traits—energy capture per capita, organization, information technology, and war-making capacity—and he uses archaeological, historical, and current government data to quantify patterns. Morris reveals that for 90 percent of the time since the last ice age, the world's most advanced region has been at the western end of Eurasia, but contrary to what many historians once believed, there were roughly 1,200 years—from about 550 to 1750 CE—when an East Asian region was more advanced. Only in the late eighteenth century CE, when northwest Europeans tapped into the energy trapped in fossil fuels, did the West leap ahead. Resolving some of the biggest debates in global history, The Measure of Civilization puts forth innovative tools for determining past, present, and future economic and social trends.

The Second Machine Age Work Progress and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies

Ian Morris, Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of History, and What
They Reveal About the Future (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010), p. 73.
2. Ibid., p. 74. 3. Ibid., p. 71. 4. Ibid., p. 112. 5. Karl Jaspers, The Origin and Goal
of ...

Author: Erik Brynjolfsson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393241254

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 450

A New York Times Bestseller. A “fascinating” (Thomas L. Friedman, New York Times) look at how digital technology is transforming our work and our lives. In recent years, Google’s autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM’s Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies—with hardware, software, and networks at their core—will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human. In The Second Machine Age MIT’s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee—two thinkers at the forefront of their field—reveal the forces driving the reinvention of our lives and our economy. As the full impact of digital technologies is felt, we will realize immense bounty in the form of dazzling personal technology, advanced infrastructure, and near-boundless access to the cultural items that enrich our lives. Amid this bounty will also be wrenching change. Professions of all kinds—from lawyers to truck drivers—will be forever upended. Companies will be forced to transform or die. Recent economic indicators reflect this shift: fewer people are working, and wages are falling even as productivity and profits soar. Drawing on years of research and up-to-the-minute trends, Brynjolfsson and McAfee identify the best strategies for survival and offer a new path to prosperity. These include revamping education so that it prepares people for the next economy instead of the last one, designing new collaborations that pair brute processing power with human ingenuity, and embracing policies that make sense in a radically transformed landscape. A fundamentally optimistic book, The Second Machine Age alters how we think about issues of technological, societal, and economic progress.

Globalization and the BRICs

Why the BRICs Will Not Rule the World For Long Francesca Beausang ... 11 of
the Ian Morris theories, Why the West Rules for Now, London, Prfile Books, 2010)
. This is an excerpt from Ian Morris's 'Why the West Rules – for Now',1 which ...

Author: Francesca Beausang

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137271604

Category: Political Science

Page: 215

View: 329

As the Eurozone faces an uncertain future and Obama struggles to demonstrate that America still has a superpower status, this book challenges the widespread perception that Brazil, Russia, India and China are becoming global economic and political powers, instead forecasting a decline rooted in excessive inequality and insufficient innovation.

Burial and Ancient Society

This book differs from many topical studies of state formation in that unique and particular developments are given as much weight as those factors which are common to all early states.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521387385

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 437

This study of the changing relationships between burial rituals and social structure in Early Iron Age Greece will be required reading for all archaeologists working with burial evidence, in whatever period. This book differs from many topical studies of state formation in that unique and particular developments are given as much weight as those factors which are common to all early states. The ancient literary evidence and the relevant historical and anthropological comparisons are extensively drawn on in an attempt to explain the transition to the city-state, a development which was to have decisive effects for the subsequent development of European society.

Western Civilization Beyond Boundaries Volume I to 1715

The Ancient Near East and the Future of the West; Why the West Rules—For Now
: The Patterns of History, and What They ... Some believe that Western rule will
persist while others think it is coming to an end with various new possibilities in ...

Author: Thomas F. X. Noble

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285500288

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 711

WESTERN CIVILIZATION: BEYOND BOUNDARIES, Seventh Edition, is distinguished for its wider definition of Europe that includes Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and European frontiers. Recognizing that factors outside the continent affected European history, the authors highlight Europe's place in the world throughout the narrative and in the primary source feature, The Global Record. The seventh edition has a streamlined design and has been carefully revised with features such as focus questions, key terms, and section summaries to help readers understand the material. The reconceived narrative and restructured organization, featuring smaller, more cohesive learning units, make the book easy to use. Available in the following split options: WESTERN CIVILIZATION: BEYOND BOUNDARIES, Seventh Edition Complete, Volume I: To 1715, Volume II: Since 1560, Volume A: To 1500, Volume B: 1300-1815, and Volume C: Since 1789. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Cengage Advantage Books Western Civilization Beyond Boundaries

The Ancient Near East and the Future of the West; Why the West Rules—For Now
: The Patterns of History, and What They ... Some believe that Western rule will
persist while others think it is coming to an end with various new possibilities in ...

Author: Thomas F. X. Noble

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285661532

Category: History

Page: 1024

View: 250

Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this text is an economically priced version of WESTERN CIVILIZATION: BEYOND BOUNDARIES, 7e. The Advantage Edition offers the high level of scholarship and engaging narrative of the full text, while limiting the number of features, images, and maps. Each volume is packaged in a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history text. Like its full-length counterpart, the Advantage Edition of WESTERN CIVILIZATION encompasses the full social and political story of Western Civilization within a wider definition of Europe that includes Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and European frontiers. The text emphasizes Europe's interaction with the world and encourages readers to question why and how history unfolded as it did. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Cengage Advantage Books Western Civilization Beyond Boundaries

The Ancient Near East and the Future of the West; Why the West Rules—For Now
: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future; Civilization:
The West and the Rest; and No One's World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the ...

Author: Thomas F. X. Noble

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285661540

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 443

Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this text is an economically priced version of WESTERN CIVILIZATION: BEYOND BOUNDARIES, 7e. The Advantage Edition offers the high level of scholarship and engaging narrative of the full text, while limiting the number of features, images, and maps. Each volume is packaged in a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history text. Like its full-length counterpart, the Advantage Edition of WESTERN CIVILIZATION encompasses the full social and political story of Western Civilization within a wider definition of Europe that includes Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and European frontiers. The text emphasizes Europe's interaction with the world and encourages readers to question why and how history unfolded as it did. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

War What Is It Good For

What Is It Good For?, the renowned historian and archaeologist Ian Morris tells the gruesome, gripping story of fifteen thousand years of war, going beyond the battles and brutality to reveal what war has really done to and for the world.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374711038

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 327

A powerful and provocative exploration of how war has changed our society—for the better "War! . . . . / What is it good for? / Absolutely nothing," says the famous song—but archaeology, history, and biology show that war in fact has been good for something. Surprising as it sounds, war has made humanity safer and richer. In War! What Is It Good For?, the renowned historian and archaeologist Ian Morris tells the gruesome, gripping story of fifteen thousand years of war, going beyond the battles and brutality to reveal what war has really done to and for the world. Stone Age people lived in small, feuding societies and stood a one-in-ten or even one-in-five chance of dying violently. In the twentieth century, by contrast—despite two world wars, Hiroshima, and the Holocaust—fewer than one person in a hundred died violently. The explanation: War, and war alone, has created bigger, more complex societies, ruled by governments that have stamped out internal violence. Strangely enough, killing has made the world safer, and the safety it has produced has allowed people to make the world richer too. War has been history's greatest paradox, but this searching study of fifteen thousand years of violence suggests that the next half century is going to be the most dangerous of all time. If we can survive it, the age-old dream of ending war may yet come to pass. But, Morris argues, only if we understand what war has been good for can we know where it will take us next.

The Herald

IN FURTHER READING Why the West Rules - For now : The Patterns of History ,
and What They Reveal About the Future by lan Morris , 2010 This entertaining
and plausible book by a British historian at Stanford University details the debate
 ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Pakistan

Page:

View: 595


The World Before Us

Tom Higham brings us to the frontier of recent discoveries with a book that is both gripping and fun' Paul Collier, author of The Bottom Billion 'This exciting book shows that we now have a revolutionary new tool for reconstructing the ...

Author: Tom Higham

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 024198906X

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 957

'Fascinating and entertaining. If you read one book on human origins, this should be it' Ian Morris, author of Why the West Rules - For Now 'The who, what, where, when and how of human evolution, from one of the world's experts on the dating of prehistoric fossils' Steve Brusatte, author of The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs 50,000 years ago, we were not the only species of human in the world. There were at least four others, including the Neanderthals, Homo floresiensis, Homo luzonesis and the Denisovans. At the forefront of the latter's ground-breaking discovery was Oxford Professor Tom Higham. In The World Before Us, he explains the scientific and technological advancements - in radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA, for example - that allowed each of these discoveries to be made, enabling us to be more accurate in our predictions about not just how long ago these other humans lived, but how they lived, interacted and live on in our genes today. This is the story of us, told for the first time with its full cast of characters. 'The application of new genetic science to pre-history is analogous to how the telescope transformed astronomy. Tom Higham brings us to the frontier of recent discoveries with a book that is both gripping and fun' Paul Collier, author of The Bottom Billion 'This exciting book shows that we now have a revolutionary new tool for reconstructing the human past: DNA from minute pieces of tooth and bone, and even from the dirt on the floor of caves' David Abulafia, author of The Boundless Sea 'The remarkable new science of palaeoanthropology, from lab bench to trench' Rebecca Wragg Sykes, author of Kindred 'Higham's thrilling account makes readers feel as if they were participating themselves in the extraordinary series of events that in the last few years has revealed our long-lost cousins' David Reich, author of Who We Are and How We Got Here 'A brilliant distillation of the ideas and discoveries revolutionising our understanding of human evolution' Chris Gosden, author of The History of Magic

Challenging Religious Studies

... 2011, Why the West Rules-For Now: The Patterns of History, and What They
Reveal About the Future, London: Profile Books, p. 166, Fig. 3.7. Page 115,
Figure 2 is from I. Morris, 2011, Why the West Rules-For Now: The Patterns of
History, ...

Author: John Atherton

Publisher: SCM Press

ISBN: 0334046491

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 610

This book represents a breakthrough in our understanding and development of the practices, ethics and theories of religious studies through engagement with the world of daily life and its breath-taking transformation since 1800, as revealed particularly in living standards, life expectancy and subjective wellbeing. Together with the equally disturbing growth of inequalities between and within nations, this constitutes the profound paradox of development. What is of particular interest is the book’s rigorous treatment of the question why religion is better at delivering greater subjective wellbeing and how it does so. To build such arguments always involves engaging with key related disciplines, experiences and practices, including economics, psychology, sociology and economic history. But it will also increasingly offer religion the opportunity to participate in such developments but always and increasingly through collaboration with other such disciplines and experiences, and always with the objective of furthering the greater wellbeing of all people in and through their environments.

Foragers Farmers and Fossil Fuels

Ian Morris's eleventh book, Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of
History and What They Reveal about the Future, published in 2010, has been
called “brilliant,” “ingenious,” and “mind-blowing.” Its scope and erudition are
astonishing ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400865514

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 294

The best-selling author of Why the West Rules—for Now examines the evolution and future of human values Most people in the world today think democracy and gender equality are good, and that violence and wealth inequality are bad. But most people who lived during the 10,000 years before the nineteenth century thought just the opposite. Drawing on archaeology, anthropology, biology, and history, Ian Morris explains why. Fundamental long-term changes in values, Morris argues, are driven by the most basic force of all: energy. Humans have found three main ways to get the energy they need—from foraging, farming, and fossil fuels. Each energy source sets strict limits on what kinds of societies can succeed, and each kind of society rewards specific values. But if our fossil-fuel world favors democratic, open societies, the ongoing revolution in energy capture means that our most cherished values are very likely to turn out not to be useful any more. Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels offers a compelling new argument about the evolution of human values, one that has far-reaching implications for how we understand the past—and for what might happen next. Originating as the Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University, the book includes challenging responses by classicist Richard Seaford, historian of China Jonathan Spence, philosopher Christine Korsgaard, and novelist Margaret Atwood.

The Western Rural Rules of Order and Rallying Song Book

... and why ; the profit of the dairy ; reading for the farmer ; book farming ; benefits
of an agricultural paper in a farmer's family ; our duty to ... progress of agriculture
in the West ; what dangers threaten the producer ; how much profit do I make
farming ; the duty of a farmer to ... shall more fully represent our principles than do
those now existing , it will still be necessary to be vigilant DUTIES OF OFFICERS
.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Farmers

Page: 122

View: 353


Civilization

... The Nature of Civilizations (Boston, 1969) Matthews, Derek, 'The Strange
Death of History Teaching (Fully Explained in Seven Easy-to-Follow Lessons',
unpublished pamphlet (January 2009) Morris, Ian, Why the West Rules – For
Now: The ...

Author: Niall Ferguson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101548029

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 815

From the bestselling author of The Ascent of Money and The Square and the Tower Western civilization’s rise to global dominance is the single most important historical phenomenon of the past five centuries. How did the West overtake its Eastern rivals? And has the zenith of Western power now passed? Acclaimed historian Niall Ferguson argues that beginning in the fifteenth century, the West developed six powerful new concepts, or “killer applications”—competition, science, the rule of law, modern medicine, consumerism, and the work ethic—that the Rest lacked, allowing it to surge past all other competitors. Yet now, Ferguson shows how the Rest have downloaded the killer apps the West once monopolized, while the West has literally lost faith in itself. Chronicling the rise and fall of empires alongside clashes (and fusions) of civilizations, Civilization: The West and the Rest recasts world history with force and wit. Boldly argued and teeming with memorable characters, this is Ferguson at his very best.