Why the West Rules for Now

The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429977043

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 520

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the West's rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the twentieth century secured its global supremacy. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, many worry that the emerging economic power of China and India spells the end of the West as a superpower. In order to understand this possibility, we need to look back in time. Why has the West dominated the globe for the past two hundred years, and will its power last? Describing the patterns of human history, the archaeologist and historian Ian Morris offers surprising new answers to both questions. It is not, he reveals, differences of race or culture, or even the strivings of great individuals, that explain Western dominance. It is the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, the world will change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process. Deeply researched and brilliantly argued, Why the West Rules—for Now spans fifty thousand years of history and offers fresh insights on nearly every page. The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years.

Im Westen nichts Neues

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The Measure of Civilization

As such, many will be interested in the data and methods made available by this important book. The Measure of Civilization contains valuable and useful ideas and insights.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691160864

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 400

View: 382

Uses four factors--energy capture per capita, organization, information technology and war-making capacity--to attempt to show which world regions were the most powerful throughout all of human history.

War

In War: What Is It Good For? Morris brilliantly dissects humanity's history of warfare to draw startling conclusions about our future.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781846684173

Category: Military history

Page: 495

View: 536

War is one of the greatest human evils. It has ruined livelihoods, provoked unspeakable atrocities and left countless millions dead. It has caused economic chaos and widespread deprivation. And the misery it causes poisons foreign policy for future generations. But, argues bestselling historian Ian Morris, in the very long term, war has in fact been a good thing. In his trademark style combining inter-disciplinary insights, scientific methods and fascinating stories, Morris shows that, paradoxically, war is the only human invention that has allowed us to construct peaceful societies. Without war, we would never have built the huge nation-states which now keep us relatively safe from random acts of violence, and which have given us previously unimaginable wealth. It is thanks to war that we live longer and more comfortable lives than ever before.And yet, if we continue waging war with ever-more deadly weaponry, we will destroy everything we have achieved; so our struggles to manage warfare make the coming decades the most decisive in the history of our civilisation. In War: What Is It Good For? Morris brilliantly dissects humanity's history of warfare to draw startling conclusions about our future.

Burial and Ancient Society

This book differs from many topical studies of state formation in that unique and particular developments are given as much weight as those factors which are common to all early states.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521387385

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 625

This study of the changing relationships between burial rituals and social structure in Early Iron Age Greece will be required reading for all archaeologists working with burial evidence, in whatever period. This book differs from many topical studies of state formation in that unique and particular developments are given as much weight as those factors which are common to all early states. The ancient literary evidence and the relevant historical and anthropological comparisons are extensively drawn on in an attempt to explain the transition to the city-state, a development which was to have decisive effects for the subsequent development of European society.

Teaching Happiness and Well Being in Schools

This book provides an introduction to the theory of positive psychology and a practical guide on how to implement the theory in (primarily secondary) schools.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 0826443036

Category: Education

Page: 225

View: 603

This book provides an introduction to the theory of positive psychology and a practical guide on how to implement the theory in (primarily secondary) schools.

The Dynamics of Ancient Empires

This volume is designed to address these deficits and encourage dialogue across disciplinary boundaries by examining the fundamental features of the successive and partly overlapping imperial states that dominated much of the Near East and ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199707614

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 106

The world's first known empires took shape in Mesopotamia between the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, beginning around 2350 BCE. The next 2,500 years witnessed sustained imperial growth, bringing a growing share of humanity under the control of ever-fewer states. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers--the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires--ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. Yet despite empires' prominence in the early history of civilization, there have been surprisingly few attempts to study the dynamics of ancient empires in the western Old World comparatively. Such grand comparisons were popular in the eighteenth century, but scholars then had only Greek and Latin literature and the Hebrew Bible as evidence, and necessarily framed the problem in different, more limited, terms. Near Eastern texts, and knowledge of their languages, only appeared in large amounts in the later nineteenth century. Neither Karl Marx nor Max Weber could make much use of this material, and not until the 1920s were there enough archaeological data to make syntheses of early European and west Asian history possible. But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons. As a result, Greek and Roman empires have largely been studied in isolation from those of the Near East. This volume is designed to address these deficits and encourage dialogue across disciplinary boundaries by examining the fundamental features of the successive and partly overlapping imperial states that dominated much of the Near East and the Mediterranean in the first millennia BCE and CE. A substantial introductory discussion of recent thought on the mechanisms of imperial state formation prefaces the five newly commissioned case studies of the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid Persian, Athenian, Roman, and Byzantine empires. A final chapter draws on the findings of evolutionary psychology to improve our understanding of ultimate causation in imperial predation and exploitation in a wide range of historical systems from all over the globe. Contributors include John Haldon, Jack Goldstone, Peter Bedford, Josef Wieseh?fer, Ian Morris, Walter Scheidel, and Keith Hopkins, whose essay on Roman political economy was completed just before his death in 2004.

A New Companion to Homer

This volume is the first English-language survey of Homeric studies to appear for more than a generation, and the first such work to attempt to cover all fields comprehensively.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004099890

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 755

View: 361

This volume is the first English-language survey of Homeric studies to appear for more than a generation, and the first such work to attempt to cover all fields comprehensively. Thirty leading scholars from Europe and America provide short, authoritative overviews of the state of knowledge and current controversies in the many specialist divisions in Homeric studies. The chapters pay equal attention to literary, mythological, linguistic, historical, and archaeological topics, ranging from such long-established problems as the "Homeric Question" to newer issues like the relevance of narratology and computer-assisted quantification. The collection, the third publication in Brill's handbook series, "The Classical Tradition," will be valuable at every level of study - from the general student of literature to the Homeric specialist seeking a general understanding of the latest developments across the whole range of Homeric scholarship.

An Introduction to the Algae

General classification of algae - Vegetative structure and methods of reproduction - Cyanophyta - Chlorophyta - Xanthophyta - Chrysophyta - Bacillariophyta - Pyrrophyta - EuglenophytaS_

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Algae

Page: 189

View: 327

General classification of algae - Vegetative structure and methods of reproduction - Cyanophyta - Chlorophyta - Xanthophyta - Chrysophyta - Bacillariophyta - Pyrrophyta - EuglenophytaS_

The Greeks

This text presents students with the history of Greece from the prehistoric through the Mycenaean Period, the Dark Ages, the Classical Period, the Hellenistic, and the absorption of Greek culture by Rome.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781292022383

Category: Greece

Page: 580

View: 187

For courses in Greek History or Greek Civilization. Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history. It features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period. This text presents students with the history of Greece from the prehistoric through the Mycenaean Period, the Dark Ages, the Classical Period, the Hellenistic, and the absorption of Greek culture by Rome.

Foragers Farmers and Fossil Fuels

Originating as the Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University, the book includes challenging responses by classicist Richard Seaford, historian of China Jonathan Spence, philosopher Christine Korsgaard, and novelist Margaret Atwood.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691175896

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 116

Most people in the world today think democracy and gender equality are good, and that violence and wealth inequality are bad. But most people who lived during the 10,000 years before the nineteenth century thought just the opposite. Drawing on archaeology, anthropology, biology, and history, Ian Morris explains why. Fundamental long-term changes in values, Morris argues, are driven by the most basic force of all: energy. Humans have found three main ways to get the energy they need—from foraging, farming, and fossil fuels. Each energy source sets strict limits on what kinds of societies can succeed, and each kind of society rewards specific values. But if our fossil-fuel world favors democratic, open societies, the ongoing revolution in energy capture means that our most cherished values are very likely to turn out not to be useful any more. Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels offers a compelling new argument about the evolution of human values, one that has far-reaching implications for how we understand the past—and for what might happen next. Originating as the Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University, the book includes challenging responses by classicist Richard Seaford, historian of China Jonathan Spence, philosopher Christine Korsgaard, and novelist Margaret Atwood.

Archaeology as Cultural History

This book shows the reader how much archaeologists can learn from recent developments in cultural history. This book shows the reader how much archaeologists can learn from recent developments in cultural history.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631174097

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 442

This book shows the reader how much archaeologists can learn from recent developments in cultural history.

Classical Greece

A reassessment of the archaeology of classical Greece, using modern archaeological approaches to provide a richer understanding of Greek society.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521456784

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 588

A reassessment of the archaeology of classical Greece, using modern archaeological approaches to provide a richer understanding of Greek society.

The Greeks

Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history and features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 558

View: 454

Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history and features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period.

Death Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity

Shows how the excavated remains of burials are a major source of evidence for social historians of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521376112

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 621

Shows how the excavated remains of burials are a major source of evidence for social historians of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

War What is it good for

In War: What Is It Good For? Morris brilliantly dissects humanity's history of warfare to draw startling conclusions about our future.

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847654541

Category: History

Page:

View: 197

War is one of the greatest human evils. It has ruined livelihoods, provoked unspeakable atrocities and left countless millions dead. It has caused economic chaos and widespread deprivation. And the misery it causes poisons foreign policy for future generations. But, argues bestselling historian Ian Morris, in the very long term, war has in fact been a good thing. In his trademark style combining inter-disciplinary insights, scientific methods and fascinating stories, Morris shows that, paradoxically, war is the only human invention that has allowed us to construct peaceful societies. Without war, we would never have built the huge nation-states which now keep us relatively safe from random acts of violence, and which have given us previously unimaginable wealth. It is thanks to war that we live longer and more comfortable lives than ever before. And yet, if we continue waging war with ever-more deadly weaponry, we will destroy everything we have achieved; so our struggles to manage warfare make the coming decades the most decisive in the history of our civilisation. In War: What Is It Good For? Morris brilliantly dissects humanity's history of warfare to draw startling conclusions about our future.

Fog in the Channel

In Fog in the Channel, Ian Morris tells the history of the Britain and its changing relationship with Europe and the Atlantic world from its transformation into an island from a peninsula at the end of the last Ice age right up to the ...

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 178283351X

Category: History

Page:

View: 629

In Fog in the Channel, Ian Morris tells the history of the Britain and its changing relationship with Europe and the Atlantic world from its transformation into an island from a peninsula at the end of the last Ice age right up to the present day. From the Neanderthals, to the arrival of the first homo sapiens (and then their departure), to the Celts, to the Romans, to the Angles, Jutes, and Saxons, to the Viking invasions, to the Normans and past that to a united Island, Spanish dominance in the Atlantic and then the settlement of North America. It charts the migration of people in and out of the islands and its changing position in the world. Applying the most recent archaeological evidence, he reveals how the interplay of geography, waves of settlements, and the introduction of new technologies produced regional inequalities. The spread of farming made the south east far wealthier than the north; the development of better ships first reconnected Britain to the continent, then allowed the governments that ruled a unified Britain to defend the island from invasion, and then with the colonisation of the North America, fuelled the British turn from the continent to the Atlantic. And it is here that we come to the central movement of the isles in the past several thousand years: from the island at the end of the world to a state central to the machinations of world power, commerce, and culture. But with the periphery beckoning once more, will Britain become the edge of Europe or the Atlantic

Frogs

With a systematic organisation of authoritative inform ation including key facts, scientific terms, a full glossary and index f or reference, this is the must-have guide for anyone interested in, or w anting to know more, about Australia's ...

Author: Lynne Adcock

Publisher: Steve Parish

ISBN: 9781741934113

Category: Amphibians

Page: 96

View: 780

Lynne Adcock shares her expert knowledge on the secret life of Austra lian frogs. This practical Wild Australia Guide introduc es Australia's various frog and toad families, informs about where they live and their life cycles and provides the answer to why so many of the se beautiful and fascinating creatures are threatened with extinction. H igh quality photographs and up-to-date information on appearance, behavi our and distribution make this book perfect for anyone who has ever wond ered about the intriguing lives of frogs, or needs guidance on knowing w here to spot them, or wants to understand how to care for them in our en vironment. With a systematic organisation of authoritative inform ation including key facts, scientific terms, a full glossary and index f or reference, this is the must-have guide for anyone interested in, or w anting to know more, about Australia's amazing frogs.

I Am a Droid

My name is C-3PO. I am a droid. There are many droids in the universe. Some fly ships, others fix Podracers, and still others fight dangerous battles. I would be honored to tell you more in this colorfully illustrated storybook.

Author: Marc Cerasini

Publisher: LucasBooks for Young Readers

ISBN: 9780375800252

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page:

View: 377

My name is C-3PO. I am a droid. There are many droids in the universe. Some fly ships, others fix Podracers, and still others fight dangerous battles. I would be honored to tell you more in this colorfully illustrated storybook.

Domesday Book Warwickshire

Warwickshire

Author: John Morris

Publisher: Domesday Books (Phillimore)

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 160

View: 425

Warwickshire