Wide Sargasso Sea

Prequel to: Jane Eyre / Charlotte Brontèe.

Author: Jean Rhys

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780393352566

Category: British

Page: 189

View: 897

Beautiful and wealthy Antoinette Cosway's passionate love for an English aristocrat threatens to destroy her idyllic West Indian island existence and her very life.

The First Mrs Rochester

Author: Avice-Claire McGovern

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 116

View: 635


Towards a Genealogy of Female Bodies in Wide Sargasso Sea Beloved and the Story of Zahra

It argues that these novels adopt a genealogical approach that aims at deconstructing fixed concepts of truth and promote an "insurrection of subjugated knoweldges".

Author: Cyrine Derraik

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Dissertations, Academic

Page: 102

View: 506


Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys as a Postcolonial Response to Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Seeing Jane Eyre and Antoinette Cosway as sisters and doubles is very popular with some critics who dealt with the works of Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys. Nevertheless, I would like to focus in this essay on Gayatri Chakravort

Author: Malgorzata Swietlik

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3640896203

Category:

Page: 20

View: 301

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,00, University of Koblenz-Landau (Anglistik), course: Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures, language: English, abstract: Wide Sargasso Sea is one of the best-known literary postcolonial replies to the writing of Charlotte Bronte and a brilliant deconstruction of what is known as the author's "worlding" in Jane Eyre. The novel written by Jean Rhys tells the story of Jane Eyre's protagonist, Edward Rochester. The plot takes place in West Indies where Rochester met his first wife, Bertha Antoinette Mason. Wide Sargasso Sea influences the common reading and understanding of the matrix novel, as it rewrites crucial parts of Jane Eyre. The heroine in Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea, Antoinette Cosway, is created out of demonic and bestialic Bertha Mason from Jane Eyre. Rhys's great achievement in her re-writing of the Bronte's text is her creation of a double to the madwoman from Jane Eyre. The heroine of Wide Sargasso Sea, the beautiful Antoinette Cosway, heiress of the post-emancipation fortune is created out of the demonc and bestialic Bertha Mason. The author transforms the first Mrs Rochester into an individual figure whose madness is caused by imperialistic and patriarchal oppression The vision of Bertha/Antoinette as an insane offspring from a family plagued by madness is no longer plausible to the reader. In this essay I would like to focus the factors which led to the madness of the protagonist. Although Bertha Mason and Jane Eyre seem to be enemies and contradictory characters in the Victorian novel, many critics find several similarities between the two heroines, their life and finally between Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea. Seeing Jane Eyre and Antoinette Cosway as sisters and doubles is very popular with some critics who dealt with the works of Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys. Nevertheless, I would like to focus in this essay on Gayatri Chakravort

The Postcolonial Rewriting of Colonial Stories

Although written in 1966, the novel is widely acknowledged as Jane Eyre's prequel and puts more emphasis on Antoinette's (as named by Rhys) life before she became the wife of a man who is never actually named but is usually identified as ...

Author: Christina Münzner

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3656041261

Category: Postcolonialism in literature

Page: 80

View: 547

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Leipzig (Institut fur Anglistik), language: English, abstract: Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre was first published in 1847 in London, at a time when British Colonialism was growing increasingly important for both the provision of cheap labour and new markets abroad. The resulting wealth was crucial for Britain's economic rise and rendered possible the Industrial Revolution as well as an increased amount of political and military power over large parts of the world. Many critics have investigated Jane Eyre in feminist or marxist terms, the former because of Jane's astonishing female individuality for the time, and the latter because of the social mobility shown in the novel (Loomba 2005: 74). But since Charlotte Bronte lived during a time when the British Empire was at its peak, her writing was certainly influenced by a colonial belief system which is also present throughout Jane Eyre. [...] Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys picks up on that notion of the silenced mad woman locked in the attic of an old English manor. Although written in 1966, the novel is widely acknowledged as Jane Eyre's prequel and puts more emphasis on Antoinette's (as named by Rhys) life before she became the wife of a man who is never actually named but is usually identified as Edward Rochester and will be referred to as such in the course of this work. Since the plot of Wide Sargasso Sea starts in Jamaica a few years after the Emancipation Act of 1833, it is historically set in approximately the same time frame as Bronte's text but provides the reader with a much more conscious depiction of colonialist practices and thought. [...] The purpose of this thesis is to examine in which aspects Wide Sargasso Sea can be declared a rewriting of Jane Eyre and what features and characteristics allow the former to stand on its own as a novel. A selection of postcolonial th

Wide Sargasso Sea at 50

Almost all these reviews overlook the modernist and postcolonial contexts of
Wide Sargasso Sea, casting it instead as a prior, and seminal, re-working of Jane
Eyre, in the same vein as Shoemaker's novel. “Dannii Elle” notes that it “bears ...

Author: Elaine Savory

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030282236

Category:

Page:

View: 401


A Study Guide for Jean Rhys s Wide Sargasso Sea

Wide Sargasso Sea, published in 1966 toward the end of Jean Rhys's writing
career, was the most successful of Rhys's literary works. The novel was well
received when it was first published and has never been out of print. It also
continues to ...

Author: Gale, Cengage Learning

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1410336727

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 15

View: 193


The portrayal of Antoinette in Wide Sargasso Sea and Bertha Mason in Jane Eyre as a Liminal Persona

The portrayal of Antoinette in Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea and Bertha Mason
in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre as a Liminal persona This paper analyses the
liminal existence of Antoinette in Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea and Bertha ...

Author: Inbisat Shuja

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3668452695

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 5

View: 724

Essay from the year 2017 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: A, , course: Caribbean Literature, language: English, abstract: This paper analyses the liminal existence of Antoinette in Jean Rhys’ "Wide Sargasso Sea" and Bertha Mason in Charlotte Bronte’s "Jane Eyre". The paper analyses the condition of the characters, especially the creole heiress in both of these novels, under the light of Victor Turner’s theory of Liminality. In doing so, it aims to highlight the importance of a sense of belonging and a foothold in shaping a person’s identity and sanity.

Waiting for the End

The ending of Wide Sargasso Sea may not seem one, because it is a feminine
ending, as perhaps the narrative has been as well. Feminists such as Sandra
Gilbert and Susan Gubar would iconize Bertha Mason, this "madwoman in the
attic," ...

Author: Earl G. Ingersoll

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838641538

Category: Fiction

Page: 286

View: 567

Waiting for the End examines two dozen contemporary novels within the context of a half century of theorizing about the function of ending in narrative. That theorizing about ending generated a powerful dynamic a quarter-century ago with the advent of feminist criticism of masculinist readings of the role played by ending in fiction. Feminists such as Theresa de Lauretis in 1984 and more famously Susan Winnett in her 1991 PMLA essay, Coming Unstrung, were leading voices in a swelling chorus of theorist pointing out the masculinist bias of ending in narrative. With the entry of feminist readings of ending, it became inevitable that criticism of fiction would become gendered through the recognition of difference transcending a simple binary of female/male to establish a spectrum of masculine to feminine endings, regardless of the sex of the writer. Accordingly, Waiting for the End examines pairs of novels - one pair by Margaret Atwood and one by Ian McEwan - to demonstrate how a writer can offer endings at either end of the gender spectrum.

Colonial Discourse Postcolonial Theory

The locked heart : the creole family romance of Wide sargasso sea PETER
HULME It ' s my belief that you remember much more than you pretend to
remember . ( Grace Poole ' s words to Antoinette , Wide sargasso sea , p . 149 )
Local ...

Author: Francis Barker

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719048760

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 291

This book on post-colonial theory has a wide geographic range and a breadth of historical perspectives. Central to the book is a critique of the very idea of the 'postcolonial' itself.

Critical Perspectives on Jean Rhys

Caribbean critics generally examine the alienation of the white creole in post
colonial society and write about Wide Sargasso Sea almost exclusively . Their
insight into the complex images and the language specific to Rhys's West Indian
novel ...

Author: Pierrette M. Frickey

Publisher: Lynne Rienner Publishers

ISBN: 9780894100598

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 235

View: 606


Three Types of Feminist Criticism and Jean Rhys s Wide Sargasso Sea

Author: Maria Olaussen

Publisher: Institute of Women's Studies

ISBN: 9789516499256

Category: Feminism and literature

Page: 176

View: 526


A Breath of Fresh Eyre

Wolfgang G. Müller The Intertextual Status of Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea:
Dependence on a Victorian Classic and Independence as a Post-Colonial Novel
1. Introduction Jean Rhys spent her childhood and youth in Jamaica, where she ...

Author: Margarete Rubik

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9042022124

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 418

View: 566

Ever since its publication in 1847 Jane Eyre – one of the most popular English novels of all time – has fascinated scholars and a wide reading public alike and has proved a source of inspiration to successive generations of creative writers and artists. There is hardly any other hypotext that has been re-worked in so many adaptations for stage and screen, has inspired so many painters and musicians, and has been so often imitated, re-written, parodied or extended by prequels and sequels. New versions in turn refer to and revise older rewritings or take up suggestions from Brontë scholarship, creating a dense intertextual web.The essays collected in this volume do justice to the variety of media involved in theJane Eyre reworkings, by covering narrative, visual and stage adaptations, including an adaptor's perspective. Contributions review a diverse range of works, from postcolonial revision to postmodern fantasy, from imaginary after-lives to science fiction, from plays and Hollywood movies to opera, from lithographs and illustrated editions to comics and graphic novels.The volume thus offers a comprehensive collection of reworkings that also takes into account recent novels, plays and works of art that were published after Patsy Stoneman's seminal 1996 study on Brontë Transformations.

Creole Crossings

Chapter Six Indicting Domestic Fiction : Wide Sargasso Sea In long novels ---
facts are very comforting to me . Of course they are always distorted , twisted ,
changed and so on . But all the same they are there . When I was despairing I
could ...

Author: Carolyn Vellenga Berman

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801443848

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 405

The character of the Creole woman--the descendant of settlers or slaves brought up on the colonial frontier--is a familiar one in nineteenth-century French, British, and American literature. In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels as Jane Eyre, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Indiana, as well as in the antislavery discourse of the period. Creole in its etymological sense means brought up domestically, and Berman shows how the campaign to reform slavery in the colonies converged with literary depictions of family life. Illuminating a literary genealogy that crosses political, familial, and linguistic lines, Creole Crossings reveals how racial, sexual, and moral boundaries continually shifted as the century's writers reflected on the realities of slavery, empire, and the home front. Berman offers compelling readings of the domestic fiction of Honoré de Balzac, Charlotte Brontë, Maria Edgeworth, Harriet Jacobs, George Sand, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and others, alongside travel narratives, parliamentary reports, medical texts, journalism, and encyclopedias. Focusing on a neglected social classification in both fiction and nonfiction, Creole Crossings establishes the crucial importance of the Creole character as a marker of sexual norms and national belonging. --Carla L. Peterson, University of Maryland

Jean Rhys

In this Reader's Guide, Carl Plasa provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the most stimulating critical responses to Wide Sargasso Sea.

Author: Carl Plasa

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781840462685

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 194

View: 717

In this Reader's Guide, Carl Plasa provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the most stimulating critical responses to Wide Sargasso Sea. The opening chapter outlines initial reactions to the novel from English and Caribbean critics, charting the differences between them. Chapter Two explores Wide Sargasso Sea 's dialogue with Jane Eyre and the theoretical questions it has raised. Succeeding chapters examine how critics have assessed the racial politics of Rhys's text, discuss the novel's African Caribbean cultural legacy, and explore how critics read the work both in terms of its moment of production and the early Victorian period in which it is set.

Failed Hybridity

Although theoretical discussions during the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s suggest that the hybrid condition has the potential to destabilize colonial power structures, the thesis argues that in these two novels hybridity falls short ...

Author: JoSann Marie Lien

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Creoles in literature

Page: 150

View: 707

The following thesis examines the postcolonial concept of hybridity--particularly the author's own concept of jailed hybridity--in a transnational context by comparing Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea and Kate Chopin's The Awakening, two novels that address Creole identity in the Caribbean Basin, a region that includes not only the Caribbean Islands but also the many land-based communities in the Americas that border the Mexican Gulf. Although theoretical discussions during the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s suggest that the hybrid condition has the potential to destabilize colonial power structures, the thesis argues that in these two novels hybridity falls short of bringing about long-lasting political and cultural defiance. This shortcoming is called jailed hybridity, and, as the thesis reveals, this concept addresses many of the objections that scholars have raised about hybridity theory since it became popular in postcolonial studies nearly twenty years ago.

Home Maison Casa

OUT OF HOUSE AND HOME : WIDE SARGASSO SEA - - - - - - - - - - - - In 1966 ,
Rhys published Wide Sargasso Sea , the novel largely responsible for her status
as a major writer of the twentieth century , and the work that brought her ...

Author: Erica L. Johnson

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838639610

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 156

"The book is concerned with homes, maisons, and case - English, French, and Italian words which refer to a similar idea yet which reveal, together, that the notion of being at home, a la maison, or a case pivots on the axis of material dwelling places as well as the more abstract concept of being at home, or chez soi.".

Sacred Possessions

... Rhys ' s Wide Sargasso Sea may be read through an Arawak myth , and her
ancestry can be assumed to be both white and black . Both of these positions are
valid ones : Rhys herself always understood her own marginality and that of
white ...

Author: Margarite Fernández Olmos

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813523613

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 859

For review see: Joseph M. Murphy, in HAHR : The Hispanic American Historical Review, 78, 3 (August 1998); p. 495-496.

Jamaica Kincaid and Caribbean Double Crossings

The Autobiography of My Mother: Jamaica Kincaid's Revision of Jane Eyre and
Wide Sargasso Sea Joanne Gass In AN AUGUST 19, 1990 INTERVIEW,
JAMAICA KINCAID SAID, ' WHEN I WAS a child I liked to read. I loved 'Jane Eyre'
[sic] ...

Author: American Comparative Literature Association

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN: 9780874139280

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 171

View: 119

Original versions of these contributions were presented at the 2002 conference of the American Comparative Literature Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Jean Rhys and the Novel as Women s Text

THE WOMAN WRITER AS READER: THE DREAM-TEXT OF WIDE SARGASSO
SEA Who blames me? Many no doubt; and I shall be called discontented. I could
not help it: the restlessness mas in my nature; it agitated me to pain sometimes.

Author: Nancy Rebecca Harrison

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807817902

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 289

View: 155

Is a woman's writing different from a man's? Many scholars -- and readers -- think so, even thought here has been little examination of the way women's novels enact the theories that women theorists have posited. In Jean Rhys and the Novel as Women's Text, Nancy Harrison makes an important contribution to the exchange of ideas on the writing practice of women and to the scholarship on Jean Rhys. Harrison determines what the form of a well-made women's novel discloses about the conditions of women's communication and the literary production that emerges from them. Devoting the first part of her book to theory and general commentary on Rhys's approach to writing, she then offers perceptive readings of Voyage in the Dark, an early Rhys novel, and Wide Sargasso Sea, Rhys's masterpiece written twenty-seven years later. She shows how Rhys uses the terms of a man's discourse, then introduces a woman's (or several women's) discourse as a compelling counterpoint that, in time, becomes prominent and gives each novel its thematic impact. In presenting a continuing dialogue with the dominant language and at the same time making explicit the place of a woman's own language, Rhys gives us a paradigm for a new and basically moral text. Originally published in 1988. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.